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Patent
Pacific Engineering, Inc | Date: 2016-09-08

A valve operator system having an arm for pivotal mounting to a vehicle and a valve operator head slidingly engaged with a track on the arm. The arm may be pivoted through a wide arc to easily reach a target valve, with the valve operator head easily slid into position. The valve operator head preferably includes a series of rollers that engage longitudinal rods positioned in the opposing rails of a track mounted to the arm. A single track on top of the arm may be used, or two tracks positioned on opposing side surfaces of the arm. Pins or a locking bolt may be used to affix the valve operator head in place once moved into the desired position above the target valve and the arm can be locking into position with a drum brake or locking pins.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.99K | Year: 2011

Navy ships require the use of hazardous materials (HM) such as hydraulic fluid, paint, acids, corrosives, etc. for daily operations. Navy safety regulations and HM management procedure (i.e. OPNAVINST 5100.19E and CHRMIP), require designated HM storerooms for bulk storage of flammable and corrosive liquids. These storerooms have dedicated fire protection systems, explosion proof electrical fixtures, and forced ventilation. In order to increase efficiency, NAVSEA approved the use of satellite storage lockers that will be placed in the work centers to store a week supply of daily use HM. The objective of this SBIR effort is to develop satellite storage lockers for the stowage of HM to meet the needs of the Fleet. Such lockers will be designed for high corrosion/fire resistance with excellent durability while satisfying all specified safety and operational requirements for storage lockers. Pacific Engineering Inc. (PEI) has a history of producing fire resistance composite components for Naval ships and submarines. Our composite lockers will be lighter than existing steel lockers that weigh between 60 to 225 pounds. PEI will also design superior protection against corrosions, and fire, smoke and toxicity per DDS 078-1 while meeting shock/vibration loads per MIL-STD-810 and Grade B UNDEX blast shock per MIL-S-901. NAVSEA approved the use of satellite storage lockers, which will be placed in the Ship"s work centers, to store a seven (7) day supply of daily use HM. The objective of our SBIR is to develop satellite storage lockers for the stowage of hazardous materials to meet the evolving needs of the Fleet. Such lockers will be designed for high corrosion/fire resistance with excellent durability while satisfying all specified safety and operational requirements for satellite storage lockers. PEI has a history of producing fire resistance composite components for Naval ships and submarines. Our composite lockers will be lighter than existing steel lockers that weigh between 60 to 225 pounds. They will also provide adequate protection against fire/smoke hazards, corrosions, and toxicity per DDS 078-1 while satisfying shock and vibration loads and Grade B UNDEX blast shock environments per Mil-Std-901D.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is the potential to impact water scarcity in arid and semi-arid geographies within the US and beyond. The proposed photobiological water treatment process utilizes the natural power of photosynthetic microorganisms (diatoms) and sunlight without the use of hazardous chemicals or non-renewable energy to remove contaminants such as silica, calcium, iron, manganese, phosphorus and nitrogen from the concentrated waste streams (brines) from advanced water reclamation and brackish groundwater desalination facilities. Additional clean, (re)usable water can be obtained from the treated brine quite cost-effectively, while reducing the volume of brine by >50% and producing algal biomass as a marketable by-product. This technology will reduce the environmental impact and also potentially improve the efficiency of water treatment. This Phase I project will have broader impacts on the advancement of science and technology related to environmental microbiology, water reuse and water resource management. The experimental data to be generated in this project could reveal many characteristics and fundamental chemistry and biology of brackish water diatoms that have not been studied in detail, as compared with those found in the freshwater and marine environment. The technical objectives in this Phase I research project are to investigate the feasibility of a diatom-based photobiological process for scalant and nutrient removal to recover more fresh water from reverse osmosis concentrate; to characterize the byproducts of this process including organic matter and algal biomass; and to investigate the scale-up challenges. The challenges and opportunities include: (1) the optimization of the biomass growth and constituent removal, including diatom strain screening, (2) impacts of toxic elements, chlorine residuals, salinity, pH, temperature, light sources, intensity, and duration, (3) formation and characterization of byproducts, (4) removal of synthetic organic compounds, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products, (5) photobiological reactor configuration and hydraulics, and (6) possible uses and economic values of algal biomass. Among them, the major challenges are the possible soluble organic byproduct formation and the relatively modest silica uptake rate. Bench- and pilot-scale experiments will be conducted to optimize the photobiological process to enable a full-scale application with a reasonable footprint. Careful diatom strain/species selection and more detailed chemical and biochemical analyses will also facilitate further process optimization and understanding of the fate of byproducts, their impacts on subsequent desalination, and possible control strategies.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is the potential to impact water scarcity in arid and semi-arid geographies within the US and beyond. The proposed photobiological water treatment process utilizes the natural power of photosynthetic microorganisms (diatoms) and sunlight without the use of hazardous chemicals or non-renewable energy to remove contaminants such as silica, calcium, iron, manganese, phosphorus and nitrogen from the concentrated waste streams (brines) from advanced water reclamation and brackish groundwater desalination facilities. Additional clean, (re)usable water can be obtained from the treated brine quite cost-effectively, while reducing the volume of brine by >50% and producing algal biomass as a marketable by-product. This technology will reduce the environmental impact and also potentially improve the efficiency of water treatment. This Phase I project will have broader impacts on the advancement of science and technology related to environmental microbiology, water reuse and water resource management. The experimental data to be generated in this project could reveal many characteristics and fundamental chemistry and biology of brackish water diatoms that have not been studied in detail, as compared with those found in the freshwater and marine environment.

The technical objectives in this Phase I research project are to investigate the feasibility of a diatom-based photobiological process for scalant and nutrient removal to recover more fresh water from reverse osmosis concentrate; to characterize the byproducts of this process including organic matter and algal biomass; and to investigate the scale-up challenges. The challenges and opportunities include: (1) the optimization of the biomass growth and constituent removal, including diatom strain screening, (2) impacts of toxic elements, chlorine residuals, salinity, pH, temperature, light sources, intensity, and duration, (3) formation and characterization of byproducts, (4) removal of synthetic organic compounds, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products, (5) photobiological reactor configuration and hydraulics, and (6) possible uses and economic values of algal biomass. Among them, the major challenges are the possible soluble organic byproduct formation and the relatively modest silica uptake rate. Bench- and pilot-scale experiments will be conducted to optimize the photobiological process to enable a full-scale application with a reasonable footprint. Careful diatom strain/species selection and more detailed chemical and biochemical analyses will also facilitate further process optimization and understanding of the fate of byproducts, their impacts on subsequent desalination, and possible control strategies.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.94K | Year: 2014

PEI is proposing to develop and produce a modular, low maintenance and cost-effective shower stalls for the Navy. The effort will design and fabricate shower stalls that require least number of standardized components, are adaptable to different shapes and sizes with optimum space utilization, possess high watertight integrity, quick and easy to install with little or no wastage of materials, are corrosion resistant and are affordable. PEI will focus work on developing innovative design concepts and advanced materials to achieve the targeted goals. PEI will utilize fire resistance, low smoke , non-toxic composite materials which are ideal in applications where corrosion resistance, low maintenance costs and high strength-to-weight ratios are desired. Modularity to fit different shapes and sizes along with future opportunities to other shipboard applications require meticulous designs. PEI has vast experience in developing innovative designs and manufacturing composites structures with wide range of reinforcements (E and S type Fiberglass, KevlarTM, and various Carbon fibers), resins (Polyesters, Vinyl Esters, Epoxies, and Polyurethanes), foams (honeycomb, closed core foams, PU, PVS, Polystyrene) and additives. PEI will design and and utilize cost-effective manufacturing of composites, that will have reliable transition from composite-to-metal designs, which is as critical as the composite structure itself.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 3.75M | Year: 2012

NAVSEA Undersea Defensive Warfare Systems Program office is developing a Surface Ship Torpedo Defense program that utilizes Anti-Torpedo-Torpedo (ATT) hard kill capability for high value unit (HVU) platforms (Carriers and Combat Logistics Force (CLF) ships). The CAT, a hard kill countermeasure, consists of All Up Round Equipment (AURE), which includes a composite canister and an Anti-Torpedo Torpedo (ATT) countermeasure. Pacific Engineering Inc will design, test and fabricate EDM prototype light weight composite components of the ATT Ready Stow Group (RSG) launcher cradle and canisters for the Anti Torpedo-Torpedo (ATT) Undersea Defensive Warfare Systems. PEI will perform structural design of the ATT RSG launcher, and perform computational modeling to design cost effective component designs backed by appropriate analytical evaluations and performance predictions. PEI will perform a material analysis to ensure components are corrosion resistance. PEI will also develop high strength materials and light weight sandwich composite ballistic panels that will fit onto the ATT RSG launcher. The launcher panels will be designed to meet Insensitive Munitions, shipboard environmental conditions, low fabrication costs, and Mil-Std-901D Grade A shock. PEI will also design and develop high strength, sandwich composite canisters with heaters.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.30M | Year: 2012

NAVSEA Undersea Defensive Warfare Systems Program office is developing a Surface Ship Torpedo Defense program that utilizes Anti-Torpedo-Torpedo (ATT) hard kill capability for high value unit (HVU) platforms (Carriers and Combat Logistics Force (CLF) ships). The CAT, a hard kill countermeasure, consists of All Up Round Equipment (AURE), which includes a composite canister and an Anti-Torpedo Torpedo (ATT) countermeasure. Pacific Engineering Inc will design, test and fabricate EDM prototype light weight composite components of the ATT Ready Stow Group (RSG) launcher cradle and canisters for the Anti Torpedo-Torpedo (ATT) Undersea Defensive Warfare Systems. PEI will perform structural design of the ATT RSG launcher, and perform computational modeling to design cost effective component designs backed by appropriate analytical evaluations and performance predictions. PEI will perform a material analysis to ensure components are corrosion resistance. PEI will also develop high strength materials and light weight sandwich composite ballistic panels that will fit onto the ATT RSG launcher. The launcher panels will be designed to meet Insensitive Munitions, shipboard environmental conditions, low fabrication costs, and Mil-Std-901D Grade A shock. PEI will also design and develop high strength, sandwich composite canisters with heaters.


Patent
Pacific Engineering, Inc | Date: 2014-09-25

An apparatus for treating wastewater, such as high-solids contend wastewater from a fracking operation, includes a solids-oil-water separation apparatus coupled to a low-pressure membrane filtration apparatus, with a wastewater recycling conduit coupled at one end to the low-pressure membrane filtration apparatus and coupled at a second end to the solids-oil-water separation apparatus, whereby progressive recycling of membrane concentrate from the low-pressure membrane filtration apparatus through the wastewater recycling conduit, into the solids-oil-water separation apparatus, provides recovery of as much as 97% of the water from a raw wastewater stream.


Trademark
Pacific Engineering, Inc | Date: 2014-01-10

excavating machines; Hydraulic valve actuators; Vacuum cleaners for industrial purposes; Vacuum pumps.


Trademark
Pacific Engineering, Inc | Date: 2014-10-31

Bulk hauling trailers; Tractor trailers; Trailers.

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