P. O. Box 57

Roosevelt, NJ, United States

P. O. Box 57

Roosevelt, NJ, United States
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Tibpromma S.,CAS Kunming Institute of Botany | Tibpromma S.,Mae Fah Luang University | Tibpromma S.,World Agroforestry Center | Tibpromma S.,Mushroom | And 173 more authors.
Fungal Diversity | Year: 2017

This is a continuity of a series of taxonomic and phylogenetic papers on the fungi where materials were collected from many countries, examined and described. In addition to extensive morphological descriptions and appropriate asexual and sexual connections, DNA sequence data are also analysed from concatenated datasets to infer phylogenetic relationships and substantiate systematic positions of taxa within appropriate ranks. Wherever new species or combinations are proposed, we apply an integrative approach using morphological and molecular data as well as ecological features wherever applicable. Notes on 112 fungal taxa are compiled in this paper including Biatriosporaceae and Roussoellaceae, Didysimulans gen. nov., 81 new species, 18 new host records and new country records, five reference specimens, two new combinations, and three sexual and asexual morph reports. The new species are Amanita cornelii, A. emodotrygon, Angustimassarina alni, A. arezzoensis, A. italica, A. lonicerae, A. premilcurensis, Ascochyta italica, A. rosae, Austroboletus appendiculatus, Barriopsis thailandica, Berkleasmium ariense, Calophoma petasitis, Camarosporium laburnicola, C. moricola, C. grisea, C. ossea, C. paraincrustata, Colletotrichum sambucicola, Coprinopsis cerkezii, Cytospora gelida, Dacrymyces chiangraiensis, Didysimulans italica, D. mezzanensis, Entodesmium italica, Entoloma magnum, Evlachovaea indica, Exophiala italica, Favolus gracilisporus, Femsjonia monospora, Fomitopsis flabellata, F. roseoalba, Gongronella brasiliensis, Helvella crispoides, Hermatomyces chiangmaiensis, H. chromolaenae, Hysterium centramurum, Inflatispora caryotae, Inocybe brunneosquamulosa, I. luteobrunnea, I. rubrobrunnea, Keissleriella cirsii, Lepiota cylindrocystidia, L. flavocarpa, L. maerimensis, Lophiotrema guttulata, Marasmius luculentus, Morenoina calamicola, Moelleriella thanathonensis, Mucor stercorarius, Myrmecridium fluviae, Myrothecium septentrionale, Neosetophoma garethjonesii, Nigrograna cangshanensis, Nodulosphaeria guttulatum, N. multiseptata, N. sambuci, Panus subfasciatus, Paraleptosphaeria padi, Paraphaeosphaeria viciae, Parathyridaria robiniae, Penicillium punicae, Phaeosphaeria calamicola, Phaeosphaeriopsis yuccae, Pleurophoma italica, Polyporus brevibasidiosus, P. koreanus, P. orientivarius, P. parvovarius, P. subdictyopus, P. ulleungus, Pseudoasteromassaria spadicea, Rosellinia mearnsii, Rubroboletus demonensis, Russula yanheensis, Sigarispora muriformis, Sillia italica, Stagonosporopsis ailanthicola, Strobilomyces longistipitatus, Subplenodomus galicola and Wolfiporia pseudococos. The new combinations are Melanomma populina and Rubroboletus eastwoodiae. The reference specimens are Cookeina tricholoma, Gnomoniopsis sanguisorbae, Helvella costifera, Polythrincium trifolii and Russula virescens. The new host records and country records are Ascochyta medicaginicola, Boletellus emodensis, Cyptotrama asprata, Cytospora ceratosperma, Favolaschia auriscalpium, F. manipularis, Hysterobrevium mori, Lentinus sajor-caju, L. squarrosulus, L. velutinus, Leucocoprinus cretaceus, Lophiotrema vagabundum, Nothophoma quercina, Platystomum rosae, Pseudodidymosphaeria phlei, Tremella fuciformis, Truncatella spartii and Vaginatispora appendiculata and three sexual and asexual morphs are Aposphaeria corallinolutea, Dothiora buxi and Hypocrella calendulina. © 2017, School of Science.


Sanchez-Ramirez S.,Royal Ontario Museum | Sanchez-Ramirez S.,University of Toronto | Tulloss R.E.,P. O. Box 57 | Tulloss R.E.,New York Botanical Garden | And 10 more authors.
Molecular Ecology | Year: 2015

Some of the effects of past climate dynamics on plant and animal diversity make-up have been relatively well studied, but to less extent in fungi. Pleistocene refugia are thought to harbour high biological diversity (i.e. phylogenetic lineages and genetic diversity), mainly as a product of increased reproductive isolation and allele conservation. In addition, high extinction rates and genetic erosion are expected in previously glaciated regions. Some of the consequences of past climate dynamics might involve changes in range and population size that can result in divergence and incipient or cryptic speciation. Many of these dynamic processes and patterns can be inferred through phylogenetic and coalescent methods. In this study, we first delimit species within a group of closely related edible ectomycorrhizal Amanita from North America (the American Caesar's mushrooms species complex) using multilocus coalescent-based approaches; and then address questions related to effects of Pleistocene climate change on the diversity and genetics of the group. Our study includes extensive geographical sampling throughout the distribution range, and DNA sequences from three nuclear protein-coding genes. Results reveal cryptic diversity and high speciation rates in refugia. Population sizes and expansions seem to be larger at midrange latitudes (Mexican highlands and SE USA). Range shifts are proportional to population size expansions, which were overall more common during the Pleistocene. This study documents responses to past climate change in fungi and also highlights the applicability of the multispecies coalescent in comparative phylogeographical analyses and diversity assessments that include ancestral species. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Chen S.,CAS Kunming Institute of Botany | Chen S.,Yunnan University | Chen S.,Honghe University | Chen S.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | And 5 more authors.
World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Lateral gene transfer (LGT) plays an important role in the molecular evolution of haloarchaea. Polyethylene glycol-mediated LGT in haloarchaea has been demonstrated in the laboratory, yet few explanations have been put forward for the apparently common, natural occurrence of plentiful plasmids within haloarchaeal cells. In this study, LGT was induced in two genera of haloarchaea, Haloferax and Halorubrum, by modification of salt concentration of media-a factor that may vary naturally in native haloarchaeal habitat. Minimal growth salt concentrations (MGSCs) of four strains of haloarchaea from these two genera were established, and transformations using two circular double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs), pSY1 and pWL102, were then produced in media at strain-appropriate MGSCs. The four strains of haloarchaea were transformed successfully by both kinds of dsDNAs with an efficiency of 102-103 transformants per microgram dsDNA. The transformation under reduced salt concentration may be an imitation of natural LGT of dsDNA into haloarchaea when salinity in normally hypersaline environments is altered by sudden introduction of fresh water-for example, by rainfall, snow-melt, or flooding-providing a reasonable interpretation for haloarchaea being naturally richer in plasmids than any other known organisms. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


PubMed | National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico, Royal Ontario Museum, University of Arts and Science of Chiapas, National Autonomous University of Mexico and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular ecology | Year: 2015

Some of the effects of past climate dynamics on plant and animal diversity make-up have been relatively well studied, but to less extent in fungi. Pleistocene refugia are thought to harbour high biological diversity (i.e. phylogenetic lineages and genetic diversity), mainly as a product of increased reproductive isolation and allele conservation. In addition, high extinction rates and genetic erosion are expected in previously glaciated regions. Some of the consequences of past climate dynamics might involve changes in range and population size that can result in divergence and incipient or cryptic speciation. Many of these dynamic processes and patterns can be inferred through phylogenetic and coalescent methods. In this study, we first delimit species within a group of closely related edible ectomycorrhizal Amanita from North America (the American Caesars mushrooms species complex) using multilocus coalescent-based approaches; and then address questions related to effects of Pleistocene climate change on the diversity and genetics of the group. Our study includes extensive geographical sampling throughout the distribution range, and DNA sequences from three nuclear protein-coding genes. Results reveal cryptic diversity and high speciation rates in refugia. Population sizes and expansions seem to be larger at midrange latitudes (Mexican highlands and SE USA). Range shifts are proportional to population size expansions, which were overall more common during the Pleistocene. This study documents responses to past climate change in fungi and also highlights the applicability of the multispecies coalescent in comparative phylogeographical analyses and diversity assessments that include ancestral species.

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