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Skedung L.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Skedung L.,Swedish Institute for Surface Chemistry | Danerlov K.,Swedish Institute for Surface Chemistry | Olofsson U.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | And 7 more authors.
Tribology International | Year: 2011

Finger friction measurements performed on a series of printing papers are evaluated to determine representativeness of a single individual. Results show occasionally large variations in friction coefficients. Noteworthy though is that the trends in friction coefficients are the same, where coated (smoother) papers display higher friction coefficients than uncoated (rougher) papers. The present study also examined the relationship between the measured friction coefficients and surface roughness to the perceived coarseness of the papers. It was found that both roughness and finger friction can be related to perceived coarseness, where group data show that perceived coarseness increases with increasing roughness. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Hirvikorpi T.,Oy Keskuslaboratorio Centrallaboratorium Ab KCL | Vaha-Nissi M.,Oy Keskuslaboratorio Centrallaboratorium Ab KCL | Mustonen T.,Oy Keskuslaboratorio Centrallaboratorium Ab KCL | Iiskola E.,Oy Keskuslaboratorio Centrallaboratorium Ab KCL | Karppinen M.,Aalto University
Thin Solid Films | Year: 2010

Thin aluminum oxide coatings have been deposited at a low temperature of 80 °C on various uncoated papers, polymer-coated papers and boards and plain polymer films using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The work demonstrates that such ALD-grown Al 2O 3 coatings efficiently enhance the gas-diffusion barrier performance of the studied porous and non-porous materials towards oxygen, water vapor and aromas. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Skedung L.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Skedung L.,Swedish Institute for Surface Chemistry | Danerlov K.,Swedish Institute for Surface Chemistry | Olofsson U.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | And 5 more authors.
Tribology Letters | Year: 2010

A macroscopic finger friction device consisting of a piezoelectric force sensor was evaluated on 21 printing papers of different paper grades and grammage. Friction between a human finger and the 21 papers was measured and showed that measurements with the device can be used to discriminate a set of similar surfaces in terms of finger friction. When comparing the friction coefficients, the papers group according to paper grade and the emerging trend is that the rougher papers have a lower friction coefficient than smoother papers. This is interpreted in terms of a larger contact area in the latter case. Furthermore, a decrease in friction coefficient is noted for all papers on repeated stroking (15 cycles back and forth with the finger). Complementary experiments indicate that both mechanical and chemical modifications of the surface are responsible for this decrease: (1) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that lipid material is transferred from the finger to the paper surface, (2) repeated finger friction measurements on the same paper sample reveal that only partial recovery of the frictional behaviour occurs and (3) profilometry measurements before and after stroking indicate small topographical changes associated with repeated frictional contacts. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source

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