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Granville, OH, United States

News Article
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Gilmar Lima, president of the Latin American Composite Materials Association (ALMACO), and Antonio Bonetti, Secretary of the Environment and Water Resources of the state of Paraná, Brazil, have agreed to create a project for the environmentally-friendly re-use of composite parts. Created in late 2014 by ALMACO, the program for composite parts covers state capital Curitiba and other 29 cities, and initially comprises bus components such as ceilings, railings and bumpers. During the first year, the organization aims to re-use five tons of composites for co-processing in cement kilns, an alternative recognized as environmentally friendly. ‘If [manufacturers] do not join the program, they will be subject to expensive fines, similar to what happened in the segment of tires and oil filters,’ reported Paulo Camatta, executive manager of ALMACO. The plan drawn up by ALMACO has the support of Masimon consulting and twelve companies of composites production chain: Ashland, CPIC, Jushi, Marcopolo, Mascarello, Morquímica, MVC, Neobus, Owens Corning, Reichhold, Royal Polymers and Tecnofibras. Also support the project the National Association of Bus Manufacturers (FABUS) and the Industry Interstate Association of Rail and Highway Material and Equipment (SIMEFRE). This story uses material from ALMACO, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. This story uses material from ALMACO, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.


Lynn Scarlett, is a former deputy secretary and chief operating officer of the U.S. Department of the Interior and currently is global managing director of policy at The Nature Conservancy. Explore the Conservancy's latest thinking, science and recommendations on climate, energy and other global issues at www.nature.org/global. Scarlett contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. John F. Kennedy once said, "Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future." While this quote may be more than 50 years old, the idea resonates for the global challenge of climate change. Looking to the present may highlight the issues at hand, but if we fail to take aggressive action now, we may not see that future. China is embracing this change as it is poised to move from leading emitter of greenhouse gasses to leader in renewable energy investments. Whether from global pressure or financial opportunity, the change is clear. The United States and China are the world's largest carbon emitters , so the 2014 agreement by U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping to reduce their countries' greenhouse gas emissions represented a major shift in momentum for addressing the effects of climate change. Both countries committed to substantial emissions-reduction efforts over the next 10 to 15 years, with the understanding that they would continue to grow more ambitious with their efforts in the future. The pledges were fundamental to each country's national commitments for the Paris Agreement, adopted during the United Nations' 2015 climate conference and awaiting signatures this month at the United Nations in New York City. Once a minimum of 55 countries representing at least 55 percent of total global greenhouse gases sign on, the agreement will come into effect. Already 100 countries are expected to attend the U.N. meeting on Earth Day this April 22. While China vowed to put a peak on its growing carbon dioxide emissions by the year 2030, a new report from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the London School of Economics and Political Science argues that the past year brought a changing economic and energy landscape. This is because China's rapid growth, which consumed tremendous amounts of energy and produced record-setting emissions, is slowing. China's economic model over the past few decades — like that of many other developing countries — was based on heavy investment in construction and related industries, such as steel and cement, in order to expand the nation's infrastructure. Such industries are energy-intensive and in China relied heavily on coal, which produces large amounts of greenhouse gas emissions . Now that much of China's infrastructure build-out is slowing, the demand for steel, cement and other building materials is decreasing, while at the same time China is expanding energy investments in hydroelectric, nuclear, wind and solar power. In fact, the increase in China's renewable energy generation is expected be larger than energy-investment increases in the European Union, the United States and Japan combined, according to the 2013 World Energy Outlook from the International Energy Agency (IEA). These promising shifts in energy investment are not unique to China. In the United States, the Energy Information Administration suggests that in the coming year, more new solar electricity-generating capacity will come online than natural gas, wind or petroleum combined. Industries are making the transition even faster than government: American businesses made deals to acquire 3.4 gigawatts of renewable energy in 2015, nearly double the peak power generation of the Hoover Dam. Of that amount, two-thirds came from first-time buyers, according to the nonprofit Rocky Mountain Institute, a leading source on addressing climate change through market-based solutions. The most-promising trend shows older established companies — like Owens Corning, Procter & Gamble and HP — joining well-publicized new industry leaders like Amazon, Google and Ikea in making the transition toward renewable energy purchases. For example, last year, Owens Corning signed an agreement with Chicago-based Invenergy for 125 megawatts of capacity, equivalent to the power needed for 30,000 households or more, from a wind farm being built in Texas.


News Article
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Owens Corning has announced plans to invest US$110 million to expand the capacity of its composites operations in India. The investment is intended to support the growing India glass fiber market with the installation of an 80,000 ton glass melter at the company’s existing facility in Taloja, India. The new melter is expected to begin start-up operations in early 2018. ‘Owens Corning is the industry leader in the growing glass fiber market in India,’ claimed Arnaud Genis, Composite Solutions business president. ‘This substantial investment in our Indian business demonstrates our confidence in the strength of the composites market and our continued commitment to our composites customers in both India and globally to meet the increasing demand for innovative glass fiber products.’ ‘Expanding our existing operations in India positions Owens Corning well to continue to benefit from a low-delivered cost platform while supporting growth in this region and worldwide,’ added Marcio A Sandri, vice president and managing director – glass reinforcements. The glass fiber market in India has grown at double-digit rates over the past decade and has operated at high levels of capacity utilization for the past three years, the company said. This story is reprinted from material from Owens Corning, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.


News Article | April 6, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

Invenergy Wind has arranged construction financing for its 257 MW Wake Wind Energy Center project located in Texas, about 50 miles east of Lubbock. “We’re pleased to have reached financial close for our Wake Wind project in Texas, the nation’s top state for installed wind. Wake Wind adds to our growing portfolio in Texas, bringing our total wind generation to nearly 2,000 MW in the state,” explained Jim Murphy, CFO and COO at Invenergy. 150 GE 1.715 MW wind turbines will be used at the site, and the wind farm is expected to begin commercial operations in the third quarter of this year. About 200 jobs will be created during the construction phase and another dozen will be required when the wind facility begins to operate. Dickens, Crosby and Floyd counties are where the turbines will be installed and each county will receive annual payments. Lease payments will be made to individual land holders as well. Two contractors are participating in the construction phase: Blattner Energy and EPC Services. Blattner is taking care of the mechanical and civil aspects and the transmission line. EPC is responsible for the electrical substation. Invenergy has already signed a PPA for 125 MW with Owens Corning to deliver electricity to the manufacturer. Invenergy also completed financing for a separate Texas farm in 2016. The Gunsight Wind Energy Center site is in Howard County, Texas, and it is expected to have a capacity of 120 MW. It will also use GE turbines. Invenergy Wind has developed over 5,539 MW of wind power projects in North America and Europe. It has also developed many solar, natural gas and energy storage projects. The company’s home office is located in Chicago. It’s great to see a very large American wind power farm being developed by an American company which also chose to purchase and install American wind turbines—especially for a project located in a state very well-known for fossil fuels. Texas has plenty of natural wind power resources—and solar power—so it very well may become a renewable energy leader some day. In fact, it is already doing well in wind power; about 40% of the whole state’s electricity was generated by it for a brief period.   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Ahlstrom has agreed to sell its building & wind business unit to Owens Corning for €73 million. The building & wind business unit produces glass fiber tissue used mainly in flooring applications as well as reinforcements used in windmill blades. In 2014 the net sales of the business was approximately €77 million and the business was profitable. The unit operates two plants in Finland in Karhula and Mikkeli and one in Tver, Russia, employing in total approximately 260 persons. It serves markets mainly in Europe and Russia as well as in North America and Asia. ‘This transaction will strengthen our balance sheet and enables us to develop other businesses more efficiently and pursue growth in areas aligned to our strategy,’ said Marco Levi, President & CEO of Ahlstrom. ‘We are happy to have identified Owens Corning as the buyer as it is vertically integrated and has ample resources to develop the glass fiber business further. We also believe this is a good solution for the unit's employees transferring to the new owner.’ This story uses material from Ahlstrom, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

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