Outcomes Research

Bethesda, MD, United States

Outcomes Research

Bethesda, MD, United States
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San Mateo, CA, May 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Evidation Health today announces the results from a study examining the association between behavioral traits inferred from passive trackers and self-reported overall health, physical health, mental health and quality of life (QoL) at ISPOR.  ISPOR’s meeting is one of the world’s largest conferences for health economics and outcomes research, with this year’s meeting anticipated to draw more than 3,800 attendees, from 80+ countries. It is well known that behavioral factors can have a profound effect on health outcomes and perceived quality of life. This study extends prior research by quantifying the link between behavioral data, including step and sleep data from activity trackers, and perceived health and QoL in the general population. “Digital methods have allowed us to expand our understanding of real-world behaviors, and their impact on health outcomes, outside of the traditional clinical trial setting,” said Jessie Juusola, Ph.D., Head of Health Outcomes Research at Evidation Health and the senior author on the study. “The findings from this study will inform the design of future studies quantifying the impact of healthcare interventions on perceived quality of life among disease-specific populations.” The poster “Digital Trackers Show That High Intensity Exercising And Consistent Sleep Patterns Are Associated With Positive Self-Reported Health Status,” identified by code PHP223, will be displayed at ISPOR’s  22nd Annual International Meeting, from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. EST today, with an author-led discussion on the 7000+ participant study beginning at 1:00 p.m. EST. Authors of the study include: Shefali Kumar, MPH, Health Outcomes Research Senior Associate, Thomas Quisel, BS, Principal Data Scientist, Luca Foschini, PhD, Chief Data Scientist and Jessie Juusola, PhD, Head of Health Outcomes Research from Evidation Health. Evidation Health helps healthcare companies quantify outcomes in the digital era, with real life data from connected patients. The company developed its Real Life Study Platform to accelerate and enhance outcomes research through large-scale virtualized pragmatic trials-- collecting novel digital signals and measuring the impact of digital health and traditional interventions far more efficiently than conventional approaches.  Evidation Health works across the healthcare ecosystem with top pharmaceutical companies, payers, providers, and digital healthcare companies. Evidation Health is a privately held company headquartered in San Mateo, CA. For more information, visit www.evidation.com. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/232ce178-5c9d-40fd-a042-59f17bfddbcf


San Mateo, CA, May 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Evidation Health today announces the results from a study examining the association between behavioral traits inferred from passive trackers and self-reported overall health, physical health, mental health and quality of life (QoL) at ISPOR.  ISPOR’s meeting is one of the world’s largest conferences for health economics and outcomes research, with this year’s meeting anticipated to draw more than 3,800 attendees, from 80+ countries. It is well known that behavioral factors can have a profound effect on health outcomes and perceived quality of life. This study extends prior research by quantifying the link between behavioral data, including step and sleep data from activity trackers, and perceived health and QoL in the general population. “Digital methods have allowed us to expand our understanding of real-world behaviors, and their impact on health outcomes, outside of the traditional clinical trial setting,” said Jessie Juusola, Ph.D., Head of Health Outcomes Research at Evidation Health and the senior author on the study. “The findings from this study will inform the design of future studies quantifying the impact of healthcare interventions on perceived quality of life among disease-specific populations.” The poster “Digital Trackers Show That High Intensity Exercising And Consistent Sleep Patterns Are Associated With Positive Self-Reported Health Status,” identified by code PHP223, will be displayed at ISPOR’s  22nd Annual International Meeting, from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. EST today, with an author-led discussion on the 7000+ participant study beginning at 1:00 p.m. EST. Authors of the study include: Shefali Kumar, MPH, Health Outcomes Research Senior Associate, Thomas Quisel, BS, Principal Data Scientist, Luca Foschini, PhD, Chief Data Scientist and Jessie Juusola, PhD, Head of Health Outcomes Research from Evidation Health. Evidation Health helps healthcare companies quantify outcomes in the digital era, with real life data from connected patients. The company developed its Real Life Study Platform to accelerate and enhance outcomes research through large-scale virtualized pragmatic trials-- collecting novel digital signals and measuring the impact of digital health and traditional interventions far more efficiently than conventional approaches.  Evidation Health works across the healthcare ecosystem with top pharmaceutical companies, payers, providers, and digital healthcare companies. Evidation Health is a privately held company headquartered in San Mateo, CA. For more information, visit www.evidation.com. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/232ce178-5c9d-40fd-a042-59f17bfddbcf


New research led by Cleveland Clinic to be published in the New England Journal of Medicine and released during the American Thoracic Society annual conference Sixty years after Cleveland Clinic researchers first isolated the role of angiotensin II in controlling blood pressure, a new international study led by Cleveland Clinic researchers shows that the compound can safely improve blood pressure among critically ill patients who are experiencing life-threatening hypotension, or low blood pressure. The research - led by Ashish Khanna, M.D., an intensivist and anesthesiologist in Cleveland Clinic's Center for Critical Care - will be published online by the New England Journal of Medicine, in conjunction with the American Thoracic Society's special session on clinical research. "Vasodilatory shock - in which a patient's blood pressure drops and blood vessels dilate - is a serious concern for ICU patients. When the condition is not responsive to high-dose vasopressors like norepinephrine and vasopressin, it is associated with high mortality, with more than half of these patients dying within 30 days," Dr. Khanna said. "We found that angiotensin II is an effective intervention for these patients, significantly increasing blood pressure in this life-threatening situation. The drug was safe and well-tolerated and also showed a trend to decreased mortality, though this did not achieve clinical significance." The study enrolled 321 patients - 163 treated with angiotensin II and 158 with placebo - who were experiencing vasodilatory shock and had received high doses of conventional vasopressors. Angiotensin II significantly improved hypotension (low blood pressure) - increasing mean arterial pressure at 3 hours - compared with placebo; nearly 70 percent of angiotensin II-treated patients (114 of 163) saw improved blood pressure compared with 23 percent of the placebo group (37 of 158 patients). The trial was conducted in 75 intensive care units across nine countries in North America, Australia and Europe. Angiotensin II was first isolated at Cleveland Clinic in the 1950s by Irvine Page, M.D., who discovered that the substance in blood causes blood vessels to constrict and blood pressure to rise. Along with co-researcher F. Merlin Bumpus, Ph.D., Page synthesized the peptide in 1957, helping to shape medicine's understanding of blood pressure and heart disease. For the first time, high blood pressure was viewed as a condition that could be treated, by blocking the body's production on angiotensin II. In this new research, the goal was to raise blood pressure in critically ill patients in vasodilatory shock by providing exogenous Angiotensin II. It is the first and largest phase III randomized controlled trial of stable, synthetic human angiotensin II. It was conducted under a special protocol assessment with the US Food and Drug Administration, which considers an uncompleted Phase III trial's design, clinical endpoints, and statistical analyses acceptable for FDA approval. The study was funded by La Jolla Pharmaceutical Inc. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02338843) and completed with internal support from the Department of Outcomes Research, and the Anesthesiology Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Located in Cleveland, Ohio, it was founded in 1921 by four renowned physicians with a vision of providing outstanding patient care based upon the principles of cooperation, compassion and innovation. Cleveland Clinic has pioneered many medical breakthroughs, including coronary artery bypass surgery and the first face transplant in the United States. U.S. News & World Report consistently names Cleveland Clinic as one of the nation's best hospitals in its annual "America's Best Hospitals" survey. Among Cleveland Clinic's 51,000 employees are more than 3,500 full-time salaried physicians and researchers and 14,000 nurses, representing 140 medical specialties and subspecialties. Cleveland Clinic's health system includes a 165-acre main campus near downtown Cleveland, 10 regional hospitals, more than 150 northern Ohio outpatient locations - including 18 full-service family health centers and three health and wellness centers - and locations in Weston, Fla.; Las Vegas, Nev.; Toronto, Canada; Abu Dhabi, UAE; and London, England. In 2016, there were 7.1 million outpatient visits, 161,674 hospital admissions and 207,610 surgical cases throughout Cleveland Clinic's health system. Patients came for treatment from every state and 185 countries. Visit us at clevelandclinic.org. Follow us at twitter.com/ClevelandClinic. News and resources available at newsroom.clevelandclinic.org.


San Mateo, CA, May 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Evidation Health today announces the results from a study examining the association between behavioral traits inferred from passive trackers and self-reported overall health, physical health, mental health and quality of life (QoL) at ISPOR.  ISPOR’s meeting is one of the world’s largest conferences for health economics and outcomes research, with this year’s meeting anticipated to draw more than 3,800 attendees, from 80+ countries. It is well known that behavioral factors can have a profound effect on health outcomes and perceived quality of life. This study extends prior research by quantifying the link between behavioral data, including step and sleep data from activity trackers, and perceived health and QoL in the general population. “Digital methods have allowed us to expand our understanding of real-world behaviors, and their impact on health outcomes, outside of the traditional clinical trial setting,” said Jessie Juusola, Ph.D., Head of Health Outcomes Research at Evidation Health and the senior author on the study. “The findings from this study will inform the design of future studies quantifying the impact of healthcare interventions on perceived quality of life among disease-specific populations.” The poster “Digital Trackers Show That High Intensity Exercising And Consistent Sleep Patterns Are Associated With Positive Self-Reported Health Status,” identified by code PHP223, will be displayed at ISPOR’s  22nd Annual International Meeting, from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. EST today, with an author-led discussion on the 7000+ participant study beginning at 1:00 p.m. EST. Authors of the study include: Shefali Kumar, MPH, Health Outcomes Research Senior Associate, Thomas Quisel, BS, Principal Data Scientist, Luca Foschini, PhD, Chief Data Scientist and Jessie Juusola, PhD, Head of Health Outcomes Research from Evidation Health. Evidation Health helps healthcare companies quantify outcomes in the digital era, with real life data from connected patients. The company developed its Real Life Study Platform to accelerate and enhance outcomes research through large-scale virtualized pragmatic trials-- collecting novel digital signals and measuring the impact of digital health and traditional interventions far more efficiently than conventional approaches.  Evidation Health works across the healthcare ecosystem with top pharmaceutical companies, payers, providers, and digital healthcare companies. Evidation Health is a privately held company headquartered in San Mateo, CA. For more information, visit www.evidation.com. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/232ce178-5c9d-40fd-a042-59f17bfddbcf


San Mateo, CA, May 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Evidation Health today announces the results from a study examining the association between behavioral traits inferred from passive trackers and self-reported overall health, physical health, mental health and quality of life (QoL) at ISPOR.  ISPOR’s meeting is one of the world’s largest conferences for health economics and outcomes research, with this year’s meeting anticipated to draw more than 3,800 attendees, from 80+ countries. It is well known that behavioral factors can have a profound effect on health outcomes and perceived quality of life. This study extends prior research by quantifying the link between behavioral data, including step and sleep data from activity trackers, and perceived health and QoL in the general population. “Digital methods have allowed us to expand our understanding of real-world behaviors, and their impact on health outcomes, outside of the traditional clinical trial setting,” said Jessie Juusola, Ph.D., Head of Health Outcomes Research at Evidation Health and the senior author on the study. “The findings from this study will inform the design of future studies quantifying the impact of healthcare interventions on perceived quality of life among disease-specific populations.” The poster “Digital Trackers Show That High Intensity Exercising And Consistent Sleep Patterns Are Associated With Positive Self-Reported Health Status,” identified by code PHP223, will be displayed at ISPOR’s  22nd Annual International Meeting, from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. EST today, with an author-led discussion on the 7000+ participant study beginning at 1:00 p.m. EST. Authors of the study include: Shefali Kumar, MPH, Health Outcomes Research Senior Associate, Thomas Quisel, BS, Principal Data Scientist, Luca Foschini, PhD, Chief Data Scientist and Jessie Juusola, PhD, Head of Health Outcomes Research from Evidation Health. Evidation Health helps healthcare companies quantify outcomes in the digital era, with real life data from connected patients. The company developed its Real Life Study Platform to accelerate and enhance outcomes research through large-scale virtualized pragmatic trials-- collecting novel digital signals and measuring the impact of digital health and traditional interventions far more efficiently than conventional approaches.  Evidation Health works across the healthcare ecosystem with top pharmaceutical companies, payers, providers, and digital healthcare companies. Evidation Health is a privately held company headquartered in San Mateo, CA. For more information, visit www.evidation.com. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/232ce178-5c9d-40fd-a042-59f17bfddbcf


There is growing concern regarding opiod use prior to a total knee replacement (TKR), and recent research has suggested that preoperative opioid use may lead to worse pain outcomes following surgery. A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated pain relief associated with TKR in patients who had used opioids before their procedure and compared it to pain relief in patients who had not. The authors found that patients who had higher pain catastrophising, the degree of an exaggerated, negative response to pain, were more likely to take opioids for pain relief. They found that patients who used opioids to manage their knee pain before their total knee replacement had less pain relief after the operation. The study was published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. "With these study results, we'd encourage physicians to consider discussing long term implications of opioid therapy with their patients," says Elena Losina, PhD, lead author, director of the Policy and Innovation Evaluation in Orthopedic Treatments Center and co-director of the Orthopedics and Arthritis Center for Outcomes Research at Brigham and Women's Hospital. "Although each patient case is different, patients and physicians should discuss the potential impact of using opioids in patients with knee osteoarthritis who are likely to consider total knee replacement within the next two years." Knee osteoarthritis is a condition associated with significant activity limitation and chronic pain. While a TKR is an effective treatment in relieving pain and restoring function, patients spend an average of 13 years using non-surgical options for pain management including the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and intra-articular injections. As the authors quote in the paper, the United States has spent over $1.5 billion annually on prescription opioids for people with knee osteoarthritis. Additionally, opioid utilization has increased drastically, with nearly 40 percent of Medicare patients with knee osteoarthritis receiving at least one opioid prescription in 2009. Although previous studies have suggested that using opiods preoperatively is associated with poor pain outcomes, the research was based on limited sample sizes and pain catastrophizing was not considered. The team reviewed data from 156 patients who had TKR at an average age of 66. They collected patient-reported outcomes and demographic data both before and six months after surgery, and abstracted data regarding opiod use from the patients' medical records. Researchers found that prior to surgery, 23 percent of patients had at least one opioid prescription. Using standard pain scales (Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the Western Ontario and the McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC)), researchers quantified the pain experiences of patients undergoing TKR. Researchers used sophisticated analytic methods to compare the change in the WOMAC pain score six months after knee surgery and establish the difference between patients who had and those who had not used opioids before TKR. Researchers found that the patients who used opioids prior to surgery had about 9 percent less pain reduction at six months following surgery. "Our findings support previous research that indicated preoperative opiod use was associated with worse clinical outcomes. This data demonstrates that preoperative opioid use may also lead to lesser pain relief in the early postoperative period," said Losina. The researchers also note that since the U.S. spends over $1.5 billion annually on prescription opioids for patients with knee osteoarthritis, and nearly $30 billion on illicit use, reducing the use of opioids may decrease their harmful effects. Clinicians and policy makers may consider limiting the use of opioids prior to TKR to optimize post-TKR pain relief.


San Mateo, CA, May 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Evidation Health today announces the results from a study examining the association between behavioral traits inferred from passive trackers and self-reported overall health, physical health, mental health and quality of life (QoL) at ISPOR.  ISPOR’s meeting is one of the world’s largest conferences for health economics and outcomes research, with this year’s meeting anticipated to draw more than 3,800 attendees, from 80+ countries. It is well known that behavioral factors can have a profound effect on health outcomes and perceived quality of life. This study extends prior research by quantifying the link between behavioral data, including step and sleep data from activity trackers, and perceived health and QoL in the general population. “Digital methods have allowed us to expand our understanding of real-world behaviors, and their impact on health outcomes, outside of the traditional clinical trial setting,” said Jessie Juusola, Ph.D., Head of Health Outcomes Research at Evidation Health and the senior author on the study. “The findings from this study will inform the design of future studies quantifying the impact of healthcare interventions on perceived quality of life among disease-specific populations.” The poster “Digital Trackers Show That High Intensity Exercising And Consistent Sleep Patterns Are Associated With Positive Self-Reported Health Status,” identified by code PHP223, will be displayed at ISPOR’s  22nd Annual International Meeting, from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. EST today, with an author-led discussion on the 7000+ participant study beginning at 1:00 p.m. EST. Authors of the study include: Shefali Kumar, MPH, Health Outcomes Research Senior Associate, Thomas Quisel, BS, Principal Data Scientist, Luca Foschini, PhD, Chief Data Scientist and Jessie Juusola, PhD, Head of Health Outcomes Research from Evidation Health. Evidation Health helps healthcare companies quantify outcomes in the digital era, with real life data from connected patients. The company developed its Real Life Study Platform to accelerate and enhance outcomes research through large-scale virtualized pragmatic trials-- collecting novel digital signals and measuring the impact of digital health and traditional interventions far more efficiently than conventional approaches.  Evidation Health works across the healthcare ecosystem with top pharmaceutical companies, payers, providers, and digital healthcare companies. Evidation Health is a privately held company headquartered in San Mateo, CA. For more information, visit www.evidation.com. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/232ce178-5c9d-40fd-a042-59f17bfddbcf


San Mateo, CA, May 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Evidation Health today announces the results from a study examining the association between behavioral traits inferred from passive trackers and self-reported overall health, physical health, mental health and quality of life (QoL) at ISPOR.  ISPOR’s meeting is one of the world’s largest conferences for health economics and outcomes research, with this year’s meeting anticipated to draw more than 3,800 attendees, from 80+ countries. It is well known that behavioral factors can have a profound effect on health outcomes and perceived quality of life. This study extends prior research by quantifying the link between behavioral data, including step and sleep data from activity trackers, and perceived health and QoL in the general population. “Digital methods have allowed us to expand our understanding of real-world behaviors, and their impact on health outcomes, outside of the traditional clinical trial setting,” said Jessie Juusola, Ph.D., Head of Health Outcomes Research at Evidation Health and the senior author on the study. “The findings from this study will inform the design of future studies quantifying the impact of healthcare interventions on perceived quality of life among disease-specific populations.” The poster “Digital Trackers Show That High Intensity Exercising And Consistent Sleep Patterns Are Associated With Positive Self-Reported Health Status,” identified by code PHP223, will be displayed at ISPOR’s  22nd Annual International Meeting, from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. EST today, with an author-led discussion on the 7000+ participant study beginning at 1:00 p.m. EST. Authors of the study include: Shefali Kumar, MPH, Health Outcomes Research Senior Associate, Thomas Quisel, BS, Principal Data Scientist, Luca Foschini, PhD, Chief Data Scientist and Jessie Juusola, PhD, Head of Health Outcomes Research from Evidation Health. Evidation Health helps healthcare companies quantify outcomes in the digital era, with real life data from connected patients. The company developed its Real Life Study Platform to accelerate and enhance outcomes research through large-scale virtualized pragmatic trials-- collecting novel digital signals and measuring the impact of digital health and traditional interventions far more efficiently than conventional approaches.  Evidation Health works across the healthcare ecosystem with top pharmaceutical companies, payers, providers, and digital healthcare companies. Evidation Health is a privately held company headquartered in San Mateo, CA. For more information, visit www.evidation.com. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/232ce178-5c9d-40fd-a042-59f17bfddbcf


According to a new study, patients who took opioids before knee surgery experienced about 9 percent less pain reduction at 6 months following surgery compared to patients who did not Boston, MA-- There is growing concern regarding opiod use prior to a total knee replacement (TKR), and recent research has suggested that preoperative opioid use may lead to worse pain outcomes following surgery. A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated pain relief associated with TKR in patients who had used opioids before their procedure and compared it to pain relief in patients who had not. The authors found that patients who had higher pain catastrophising, the degree of an exaggerated, negative response to pain, were more likely to take opioids for pain relief. They found that patients who used opioids to manage their knee pain before their total knee replacement had less pain relief after the operation. The study was published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. "With these study results, we'd encourage physicians to consider discussing long term implications of opioid therapy with their patients," says Elena Losina, PhD, lead author, director of the Policy and Innovation Evaluation in Orthopedic Treatments Center and co-director of the Orthopedics and Arthritis Center for Outcomes Research at Brigham and Women's Hospital. "Although each patient case is different, patients and physicians should discuss the potential impact of using opioids in patients with knee osteoarthritis who are likely to consider total knee replacement within the next two years." Knee osteoarthritis is a condition associated with significant activity limitation and chronic pain. While a TKR is an effective treatment in relieving pain and restoring function, patients spend an average of 13 years using non-surgical options for pain management including the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and intra-articular injections. As the authors quote in the paper, the United States has spent over $1.5 billion annually on prescription opioids for people with knee osteoarthritis. Additionally, opioid utilization has increased drastically, with nearly 40 percent of Medicare patients with knee osteoarthritis receiving at least one opioid prescription in 2009. Although previous studies have suggested that using opiods preoperatively is associated with poor pain outcomes, the research was based on limited sample sizes and pain catastrophizing was not considered. The team reviewed data from 156 patients who had TKR at an average age of 66. They collected patient-reported outcomes and demographic data both before and six months after surgery, and abstracted data regarding opiod use from the patients' medical records. Researchers found that prior to surgery, 23 percent of patients had at least one opioid prescription. Using standard pain scales (Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the Western Ontario and the McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC)), researchers quantified the pain experiences of patients undergoing TKR. Researchers used sophisticated analytic methods to compare the change in the WOMAC pain score six months after knee surgery and establish the difference between patients who had and those who had not used opioids before TKR. Researchers found that the patients who used opioids prior to surgery had about 9 percent less pain reduction at six months following surgery. "Our findings support previous research that indicated preoperative opiod use was associated with worse clinical outcomes. This data demonstrates that preoperative opioid use may also lead to lesser pain relief in the early postoperative period," said Losina. The researchers also note that since the U.S. spends over $1.5 billion annually on prescription opioids for patients with knee osteoarthritis, and nearly $30 billion on illicit use, reducing the use of opioids may decrease their harmful effects. Clinicians and policy makers may consider limiting the use of opioids prior to TKR to optimize post-TKR pain relief. This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Grant K24AR057827 and Partners HealthCare. Paper cited: Losina et al. "Impact of Preoperative Opioid Use on Total Knee Arthroplasty Outcomes." Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, DOI: 10.2106/JBJS.16.01200 Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) is a 793-bed nonprofit teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a founding member of Partners HealthCare. BWH has more than 4.2 million annual patient visits and nearly 46,000 inpatient stays, is the largest birthing center in Massachusetts and employs nearly 16,000 people. The Brigham's medical preeminence dates back to 1832, and today that rich history in clinical care is coupled with its national leadership in patient care, quality improvement and patient safety initiatives, and its dedication to research, innovation, community engagement and educating and training the next generation of health care professionals. Through investigation and discovery conducted at its Brigham Research Institute (BRI), BWH is an international leader in basic, clinical and translational research on human diseases, more than 3,000 researchers, including physician-investigators and renowned biomedical scientists and faculty supported by nearly $666 million in funding. For the last 25 years, BWH ranked second in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) among independent hospitals. BWH is also home to major landmark epidemiologic population studies, including the Nurses' and Physicians' Health Studies and the Women's Health Initiative as well as the TIMI Study Group, one of the premier cardiovascular clinical trials groups. For more information, resources and to follow us on social media, please visit BWH's online newsroom.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DALLAS - May 17, 2017 - One in three patients hospitalized for medical problems experienced a drop in their red blood cell count due to the hospitalization - a concept called hospital-acquired anemia, new research showed. Moreover, the worse the hospital-acquired anemia - or the more blood lost - the higher the risk of death or readmission, even after adjusting for other important factors, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers reported in a study involving 11,000 patients cared for in six hospitals. "This study shines a spotlight on a very common but underappreciated risk of hospitalization, hospital-acquired anemia, which has traditionally been viewed as an incidental change in the red blood count of no significance. However, our results showed that hospital-acquired anemia was associated with worse clinical outcomes after leaving the hospital so it needs to be taken more seriously," said senior author Dr. Ethan Halm, Director of UT Southwestern's Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research and Chief of the William T. and Gay F. Solomon Division of General Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern. Dr. Halm, Professor of Internal Medicine and Clinical Sciences, holds the Walter Family Distinguished Chair in Internal Medicine in Honor of Albert D. Roberts, M.D. Hospital-acquired anemia is defined as having a normal blood count on admission but developing anemia during the course of hospitalization. The most severe form of hospital-acquired anemia was independently associated with a 39 percent increase in the odds of being readmitted or dying within 30 days after hospital discharge compared with not developing hospital-acquired anemia. The most severe form was defined as a hematocrit of 27 percent or less at the time of discharge, occurring in 1.4 percent of all hospitalizations in the study, which appears in the Journal of Hospital Medicine. "This is the first study of post-discharge adverse outcomes of hospital-acquired anemia among a diverse group of patients who were hospitalized for different reasons," said lead author Dr. Anil Makam, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Clinical Sciences and a member of the Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research. Other studies have examined post-discharge outcomes in patients hospitalized for heart attacks. While the study does not establish preventability, it points to several directly associated risk factors of developing hospital-acquired anemia. "Our findings suggest that reducing blood loss during major surgeries and reducing unnecessary testing during hospital stays may lower a patient's risk of developing severe hospital-acquired anemia, and potentially improve their recovery," said Dr. Makam. In the current study, researchers found that the two strongest potentially modifiable predictors of developing moderate or severe hospital-acquired anemia are length of hospital stay and patients undergoing major surgery. In the future, researchers hope to examine other patient-centered outcomes that may be related to hospital-acquired anemia, such as fatigue, functional impairment, and the trajectory of post-hospital recovery. Others involved in the study included Dr. Oanh Nguyen, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Clinical Sciences, and analyst Christopher Clark in the Office of Research Administration at Parkland Health and Hospital System. The study was supported by UT Southwestern's Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) and the National Institute on Aging. PCOR helps facilitate studies designed to ensure delivery of high-quality, patient-centered, evidence-based, equitable care. The UT Southwestern PCOR Center is funded through a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), with a mission to produce evidence to make health care safer, higher quality, more accessible, equitable, and affordable, and to work with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other partners to ensure that the evidence is understood and used. UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. The faculty of almost 2,800 is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in about 80 specialties to more than 100,000 hospitalized patients and oversee approximately 2.2 million outpatient visits a year. This news release is available on our website at http://www. To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via email, subscribe at http://www.

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