OU Cancer Institute

Oklahoma City, OK, United States

OU Cancer Institute

Oklahoma City, OK, United States
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Whorton J.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Sureban S.M.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Sureban S.M.,OU Cancer Institute | May R.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | And 9 more authors.
Digestive Diseases and Sciences | Year: 2015

Background: Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1), a putative tumor stem cell marker has been shown to be highly expressed in the stromal and epithelial compartments in colon and pancreatic cancer as well as Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC).Aim: To prospectively investigate whether the immunohistochemical expression of DCLK1 was associated with detectable DCLK1 plasma expression in patients with existing BE and EAC.Methods: Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin-embedded sections using DCLK1 antibody and scored based on staining intensity and tissue involvement. Purified human plasma samples were subjected to Western blot and ELISA analysis.Results: Forty (40) patients were enrolled: 10 controls (normal endoscopy) and 30 with BE/EAC (13 nondysplastic BE [NDBE], 9 dysplastic BE [DBE] and 8 EAC). Mean epithelial DCLK1 staining was as follows: controls = 0.11, NDBE = 3.83, DBE = 6.0, EAC = 7.17. Mean stromal DCLK1 staining was as follows: NDBE = 5.83, DBE = 5.375, EAC = 10.83. DCLK1 was detected by plasma Western blot in 1 control and in all patients with BE/EAC p < 0.0005. Plasma DCLK1 was elevated by ELISA in EAC compared to other groups, p < 0.05.Conclusions: Increased expression of DCLK1 was observed in the epithelium, stroma and plasma of patients with BE/EAC. Furthermore, the presence of detectable DCLK1 in plasma of BE/EAC patients may provide a less invasive, detection tool in those patients as well as represent a novel molecular marker distinguishing between normal esophageal mucosa and BE or EAC. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


May R.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Sureban S.M.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Lightfoot S.A.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Hoskins A.B.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | And 10 more authors.
American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology | Year: 2010

Stem cells are critical in maintaining adult homeostasis and have been proposed to be the origin of many solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer. Here we demonstrate the expression patterns of the putative intestinal stem cell marker DCAMKL-1 in the pancreas of uninjured C57BL/6 mice compared with other pancreatic stem/progenitor cell markers. We then determined the viability of isolated pancreatic stem/progenitor cells in isotransplantation assays following DCAMKL-1 antibody-based cell sorting. Sorted cells were grown in suspension culture and injected into the flanks of athymic nude mice. Here we report that DCAMKL-1 is expressed in the main pancreatic duct epithelia and islets, but not within acinar cells. Coexpression was observed with somatostatin, NGN3, and nestin, but not glucagon or insulin. Isolated DCAMKL-1+ cells formed spheroids in suspension culture and induced nodule formation in isotransplantation assays. Analysis of nodules demonstrated markers of early pancreatic development (PDX-1), glandular epithelium (cytokeratin-14 and Ep-CAM), and isletlike structures (somatostatin and secretin). These data taken together suggest that DCAMKL-1 is a novel putative stem/progenitor marker, can be used to isolate normal pancreatic stem/progenitors, and potentially regenerates pancreatic tissues. This may represent a novel tool for regenerative medicine and a target for anti-stem cell-based therapeutics in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2010 the American Physiological Society.


Sureban S.M.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | May R.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Lightfoot S.A.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Hoskins A.B.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | And 12 more authors.
Cancer Research | Year: 2011

Pancreatic cancer is an exceptionally aggressive disease in great need of more effective therapeutic options. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and there is a gain of stem cell properties during EMT. Here we report increased expression of the putative pancreatic stem cell marker DCAMKL-1 in an established KRAS transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Colocalization of DCAMKL-1 with vimentin, a marker of mesenchymal lineage, along with 14-3-3 s was observed within premalignant PanIN lesions that arise in the mouse model. siRNA-mediated knockdown of DCAMKL-1 in human pancreatic cancer cells induced microRNA miR-200a, an EMT inhibitor, along with downregulation of EMT-associated transcription factors ZEB1, ZEB2, Snail, Slug, and Twist. Furthermore, DCAMKL-1 knockdown resulted in downregulation of c-Myc and KRAS through a let-7a microRNA-dependent mechanism, and downregulation of Notch-1 through a miR-144 microRNA-dependent mechanism. These findings illustrate direct regulatory links between DCAMKL-1, microRNAs, and EMT in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, they demonstrate a functional role for DCAMKL-1 in pancreatic cancer. Together, our results rationalize DCAMKL-1 as a therapeutic target for eradicating pancreatic cancers. ©2011 AACR.


Sureban S.M.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | May R.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | Mondalek F.G.,Swaasth Inc. | Qu D.,The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Nanobiotechnology | Year: 2011

Background: The development of effective drug delivery systems capable of transporting small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been elusive. We have previously reported that colorectal cancer tumor xenograft growth was arrested following treatment with liposomal preparation of siDCAMKL-1. In this report, we have utilized Nanoparticle (NP) technology to deliver DCAMKL-1 specific siRNA to knockdown potential key cancer regulators. In this study, mRNA/miRNA were analyzed using real-time RT-PCR and protein by western blot/immunohistochemistry. siDCAMKL-1 was encapsulated in Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-based NPs (NP-siDCAMKL-1); Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice, treated with NP-siDCAMKL-1 and DAPT (γ-secretase inhibitor) alone and in combination. To measure let-7a and miR-144 expression in vitro, HCT116 cells were transfected with plasmids encoding the firefly luciferase gene with let-7a and miR-144 miRNA binding sites in the 3'UTR.Results: Administration of NP-siDCAMKL-1 into HCT116 xenografts resulted in tumor growth arrest, downregulation of proto-oncogene c-Myc and Notch-1 via let-7a and miR-144 miRNA-dependent mechanisms, respectively. A corresponding reduction in let-7a and miR-144 specific luciferase activity was observed in vitro. Moreover, an upregulation of EMT inhibitor miR-200a and downregulation of the EMT-associated transcription factors ZEB1, ZEB2, Snail and Slug were observed in vivo. Lastly, DAPT-mediated inhibition of Notch-1 resulted in HCT116 tumor growth arrest and down regulation of Notch-1 via a miR-144 dependent mechanism.Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that nanoparticle-based delivery of siRNAs directed at critical targets such as DCAMKL-1 may provide a novel approach to treat cancer through the regulation of endogenous miRNAs. © 2011 Sureban et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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