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Simmerath, Germany

Valder G.,Otto Junker GmbH
Elektrowaerme International | Year: 2012

This article presents the range of induction-type billet heaters and their advantages. It is supplemented by a review of the handling systems employed from the billet or log feeding station to the point of billet transfer to the extrusion press. Operating cost and CO 2 emission calculations for various materials and key European countries round out the presentation.


In Germany, economic, transport and energy policy has in recent years been moulded primarily by the themes of energy efficiency and clean energy transition. The scientifically acknowledged target is to avoid boosting the anthropogenic greenhouse effect. The measuring parameter is the specific emission of CO2 which accounts for 87 % of all gas emissions harmful to the climate. In this context, electromobility in particular is promoted as a clean future technology ("zero emission vehicle", ZEV). The present article provides guidance in assessing ZEV against conventional and alternative drive concepts. The benefit to be anticipated in each case is evaluated both economically and ecologically.


Starting out from the technical and economic state of the art attained in induction furnace technology, the emerging trends and development tendencies for the next few years are presented. Visions for the future and innovative ideas are likewise discussed. The first part of the paper deals with induction furnace technology for melting applications, the second part focuses on pouring furnace technology. Part 1: Induction furnace technology for melting applications (coreless induction furnaces).


Starting out from the technical and economic state of the art attained in induction furnace technology, the emerging trends and development tendencies for the next few years are presented. Visions for the future and innovative ideas are likewise discussed. The first part of the paper deals with induction furnace technology for melting applications, the second part focuses on pouring furnace technology. Part 2: Pouring furnace technology. © copyright: DIV Deutscher Industrieverlag GmbH / Vulkan-Verlag GmbH -02/2016.


Designing and building furnace systems for melting and pouring copper materials is a challenging and many-faceted task, given the technological requirements profile of these furnaces. The challenge consists in producing materials with an extremely low oxygen and hydrogen content, which involves very precise oxidation and deoxidation processes. Furthermore, it is necessary to turn out metallurgically difficult alloys that must be cast into highly difficult formats. The many-faceted part lies in accommodating a range of quite different production processes, which calls for a diversity of process-specific furnace designs. The specific benefits associated with the induction furnace technology - such as direct heating of the metal with almost no temperature overshoot, intense but controlled bath movement, high-precision temperature and process management, and adjustable metallurgical behaviour - are of key importance in melting, alloying, refining and pouring as well as in holding the various copper materials at temperature. Thanks to these process benefits and the highly reliable and economical operation and low power consumption, induction furnaces are widely accepted in the manufacture of copper materials and, at the same time, the high metallurgical demands of this material have promoted ongoing development of induction furnace technology [1].

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