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Johnston D.H.,Otterbein College | Gao L.,University of Oregon | Lonergan M.C.,University of Oregon
Macromolecules | Year: 2010

The ion density in ionically functionalized polyacetylenes can be controlled by the ring-opening metathesis copolymerization of functionalized cyclooctatetraene (RCOT) monomers. Studies are reported on the kinetics for copolymerization of anionic (M A, R = -CH 2CH 2SO 3 -NMe 4 +) and cationic (M c, R = -CH 2CH 2-NMe 3 +CF 3SO 3 -) RCOTs with a nonionizable RCOT (M T, R = -SiMe 3) initiated by the well-defined tungsten imidoalkylidene catalyst W[CH(o-C 6H 4OMe)](NC 6H 5)[OCCH 3(CF 3) 2] 2(THF). Twenty separate copolymerizations were studied as a function of the mole fraction of ionic monomer in the feedstock. The monomer consumption was observed to follow zero-order behavior over a range of monomer concentration in the M A-M T system, whereas it was observed to follow first-order behavior in the M c-M T system. The zero-order behavior in the M A-M T system was observed to lead to much less drift in polymer composition than predicted by classic copolymerization theory. The initial rates of monomer conversion were determined and used to calculate the copolymer composition curve. The curves exhibited sigmoidal shapes as described by reactivity ratios rc = 8 ± 3 and r T = 4 ± 2 for the M C-M T system and r A = 2.0 ± 0.3 and r T = 2.3 ± 0.3 for the M A-M T system. In all cases, the rate of initiation was observed to be slow relative to propagation, and the initiation rate for MT was observed to be approximately a factor of 4 greater than for the ionic monomers under similar conditions of monomer and catalyst concentration. The observed trends are explained in terms of ion-ion interactions. These interactions are argued to create different local activities of the ionic monomers in the vicinity of an active catalyst center with ultimate ionic monomer as compared to near either the uninitiated catalyst or an active catalyst center with ultimate nonionic monomer. The largest effects are observed in the M C-M T system where, in addition to the largest reactivity ratios, the ratio of the overall polymerization rate to the initiation rate increases by a factor of 20 in progressing from the homopolymerization of M T to that of M c. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Robinson S.G.,University of Oregon | Johnston D.H.,Otterbein College | Weber C.D.,University of Oregon | Lonergan M.C.,University of Oregon
Chemistry of Materials | Year: 2010

The diffusion of dopant counterions has made the formation of conjugated polymer p-n junctions challenging. We demonstrate polyelectrolyte mediated electrochemistry (PMEC) as a three-electrode technique for separately introducing n- and p-type regions in an ion-functionalized polyacetylene structure to form a p-n junction. PMEC uses a polyelectrolyte-based supporting electrolyte and ionfunctionalized conjugated polymers to control the ions available for exchange between a solid sample and supporting electrolyte, and in this way, select for oxidative vs reductive electrochemical processes. A bilayer consisting of solid layers of anionically and cationically functionalized polyacetylenes was driven first to -1.5 V vs SCE and then to 0.6 V vs SCE using tetrabutylammonium polystyrene sulfonate/acetonitrile as a supporting electrolyte. The negative potential step n-doped the entire structure, and the positive potential step selectively p-doped the anionically functionalized layer to form a p-n junction as followed by spectroelectrochemistry and supported by current-voltage characterization. The polyacetylene p-n junctions were observed to exhibit diode behavior with ideality factors in the range of 3-3.5. Rectification ratios of greater than 500 at 1 V were achieved, and the junctions exhibited a small photovoltaic effect. © 2009 American Chemical Society.


GSF Mortgage Corp. Makes Its Mark in “The City of Invention,” Welcomes Akron Office Akron, OH, February 24, 2017 --( The Akron team will report to GSF Regional Manager, Todd Pennington. It includes the following staff additions: Timothy Krichbaum has been working in the mortgage industry for 16 years, after he was first introduced to the trade while in his last semester at Otterbein College. Krichbaum will serve as area sales manager, helping to expand GSF’s retail branches and footprint throughout the U.S. “I look forward to the growth and expansion of this great brand, and being a part of a company that truly serves its communities,” Krichbaum says. “I believe this was the job I was made for.” David Darr is a Kent State University alum who has been in the mortgage business for four years. He joins GSF as a loan originator, and says he enjoys helping people improve their financial position. Jon-Michael Majkut joins GSF as a loan originator. The Ohio State alum, and hockey enthusiast, Majkut has served in the mortgage industry for five years. With his new role, Majkut looks forward to making the mortgage process a positive experience for all his clients. He is also excited to grow with GSF. “We are a new office, but we have strong leadership and big goals,” he adds. Ross Martin is also an Ohio State University graduate. A professional in the mortgage industry for six years, Martin joins GSF as a lead loan processor. Joseph Arvay has been in the mortgage industry for 14 years, and joins GSF as a loan originator. He plans to put his marketing major from the University of Akron to use, by sharing the benefits of homeownership with military service members, and connecting with local builders, realtors and clients. “My clients choose to work with me just because of the financial aspect of the refinance or purchase process, but the ease of mind knowing they are going to have a smooth process from start to finish.” Mary Gellar joins GSF as a junior processor. Gellar will be responsible for preparing loans to submit to the processing department. Brett Martin has served in the mortgage industry for five years. He joins GSF as a system support trainer and says he hopes to build a network within the community and transform his new role into a lifelong career. “I love helping people,” he says. “I went to school to be a firefighter and helping people is what excites me about this industry.” Jerime Loyd joins GSF also as a system support manager, after serving more than 17 years in the mortgage industry. He hopes to assist each banker to reach their professional goals, as well as connect with local businesses to help expand GSF’s reach in the Akron market. “It’s a great feeling helping families achieve homeownership,” Loyd says. “If we achieve this, our branch will be a success.” CJ Simpson entered the mortgage industry following graduation at Kent State University in 2007, and joins GSF as a marketing manager. He is excited to help Akron residents realize the dream of homeownership, and to help the lender become a leader in service excellence. “As a person that has been on the receiving end of terrible customer service, I know frustrated it can make a person feel,” Simpson says. “My goal is to make sure every person I speak with feels like they are the most important person in the room.” Evan Vanover is a former Marine and has served in the mortgage industry for more than a decade. He joins GSF as a loan officer, and looks forward to meeting with people from all walks of life and helping them to reach their homebuying dreams. “In my new position, I hope to gain satisfaction through helping people with better mortgage products and transform them into lifelong clients,” he adds. GSF Mortgage continues to seek mortgage rockstars for a number of positions throughout the United States including branch managers, mortgage underwriters and mortgage processors. If you are looking for a dynamic company with a great work culture, benefits and a remarkable reputation, please visit gogsf.com/careers. Founded in 1995, GSF Mortgage is an established and experienced direct mortgage lender. With 20 years of lending experience, GSF professionals originate, process, underwrite, and fund all loans. We continue to serve the next generation of homeowners with the GoGSF brand. We are focused on flexible and transparent mortgage lending and are on a quest to continue hiring the "best of the best" in the mortgage industry. With many locations, our strengths keep GSF Mortgage “Lending in Your Favor.” Interested in finding out more about us? Visit us at GoGSF.com and check out our available career opportunities. Akron, OH, February 24, 2017 --( PR.com )-- GSF Mortgage Corp. is pleased to announce the addition of an Akron, Ohio office. The new team expands GSF’s footprint in the Midwestern market, and includes both newcomers, as well as industry veterans eager to share their breadth of mortgage experience with residents living in The City of Invention.The Akron team will report to GSF Regional Manager, Todd Pennington. It includes the following staff additions:Timothy Krichbaum has been working in the mortgage industry for 16 years, after he was first introduced to the trade while in his last semester at Otterbein College. Krichbaum will serve as area sales manager, helping to expand GSF’s retail branches and footprint throughout the U.S. “I look forward to the growth and expansion of this great brand, and being a part of a company that truly serves its communities,” Krichbaum says. “I believe this was the job I was made for.”David Darr is a Kent State University alum who has been in the mortgage business for four years. He joins GSF as a loan originator, and says he enjoys helping people improve their financial position.Jon-Michael Majkut joins GSF as a loan originator. The Ohio State alum, and hockey enthusiast, Majkut has served in the mortgage industry for five years. With his new role, Majkut looks forward to making the mortgage process a positive experience for all his clients. He is also excited to grow with GSF. “We are a new office, but we have strong leadership and big goals,” he adds.Ross Martin is also an Ohio State University graduate. A professional in the mortgage industry for six years, Martin joins GSF as a lead loan processor.Joseph Arvay has been in the mortgage industry for 14 years, and joins GSF as a loan originator. He plans to put his marketing major from the University of Akron to use, by sharing the benefits of homeownership with military service members, and connecting with local builders, realtors and clients. “My clients choose to work with me just because of the financial aspect of the refinance or purchase process, but the ease of mind knowing they are going to have a smooth process from start to finish.”Mary Gellar joins GSF as a junior processor. Gellar will be responsible for preparing loans to submit to the processing department.Brett Martin has served in the mortgage industry for five years. He joins GSF as a system support trainer and says he hopes to build a network within the community and transform his new role into a lifelong career. “I love helping people,” he says. “I went to school to be a firefighter and helping people is what excites me about this industry.”Jerime Loyd joins GSF also as a system support manager, after serving more than 17 years in the mortgage industry. He hopes to assist each banker to reach their professional goals, as well as connect with local businesses to help expand GSF’s reach in the Akron market. “It’s a great feeling helping families achieve homeownership,” Loyd says. “If we achieve this, our branch will be a success.”CJ Simpson entered the mortgage industry following graduation at Kent State University in 2007, and joins GSF as a marketing manager. He is excited to help Akron residents realize the dream of homeownership, and to help the lender become a leader in service excellence. “As a person that has been on the receiving end of terrible customer service, I know frustrated it can make a person feel,” Simpson says. “My goal is to make sure every person I speak with feels like they are the most important person in the room.”Evan Vanover is a former Marine and has served in the mortgage industry for more than a decade. He joins GSF as a loan officer, and looks forward to meeting with people from all walks of life and helping them to reach their homebuying dreams. “In my new position, I hope to gain satisfaction through helping people with better mortgage products and transform them into lifelong clients,” he adds.GSF Mortgage continues to seek mortgage rockstars for a number of positions throughout the United States including branch managers, mortgage underwriters and mortgage processors. If you are looking for a dynamic company with a great work culture, benefits and a remarkable reputation, please visit gogsf.com/careers.Founded in 1995, GSF Mortgage is an established and experienced direct mortgage lender. With 20 years of lending experience, GSF professionals originate, process, underwrite, and fund all loans. We continue to serve the next generation of homeowners with the GoGSF brand. We are focused on flexible and transparent mortgage lending and are on a quest to continue hiring the "best of the best" in the mortgage industry. With many locations, our strengths keep GSF Mortgage “Lending in Your Favor.” Interested in finding out more about us? Visit us at GoGSF.com and check out our available career opportunities. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from GoGSF


Trademark
Otterbein University and Otterbein College | Date: 2011-06-14

Paper goods, namely, notebooks, pocket folders, wire-bound notebooks, ringed notebooks and date scheduling books. Apparel, namely, t-shirts, sweatshirts, pants, shorts, hats, jackets, pajama pants and pajama shorts, socks, gloves, scarves and neckties. Organizing and conducting community service events. Educational services, namely, providing courses of instruction at the college level and organizing educational and cultural exhibits; entertainment services, namely, organizing and conducting collegiate sporting, dramatic, musical and recreational events.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 629.13K | Year: 2013

The project at Otterbein College is providing scholarships and enhanced academic and co-curricular experiences to students majoring in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, or Physics. Fourteen scholars, who entered as first-year students, are receiving four years of support and fourteen scholars are receiving two years of support following their transfer to Otterbein after completing a 2-year program at a regional community college. Scholars, selected based on both previous academic experience, and an on-campus interview, are participating in an active learning community whose components include a three day-long summer immersion experience, programming with the Center for Career Planning, residence in a living-learning house, a focused seminar program, and a mentoring triad which includes a peer, a faculty member, and a STEM professional. All S-STEM scholars are eligible for a paid summer research experience as an explicit part of the program designed to help students maintain an interest in STEM fields, improve the likelihood they will earn higher GPAs and persist in the major. The project, through its recruiting strategies with local high schools, is leading to greater retention in STEM majors and access to STEM careers for students from groups traditionally underrepresented in chemistry, particularly first-generation college students.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: AMO Experiment/Atomic, Molecul | Award Amount: 144.68K | Year: 2016

The goal of this project is to study the Rydberg excitation blockade. Atoms will be cooled to extremely low temperatures and put into high energy states called Rydberg states. In Rydberg states the outermost electron (or the negatively charged component of an atom) travels in extremely large orbits around the nucleus (or the core of an atom). Because of these large orbits, atoms in Rydberg states have properties which are exaggerated relative to the properties of atoms in their natural, or ground state. One such property is that Rydberg atoms interact strongly with each other when separated by large distances, even though they have no net charge. Normally, when a laser is shined on a group of atoms, the outermost electron in each atom is readily promoted to Rydberg states. However, the interactions among multiple Rydberg atoms causes this excitation to be suppressed, or blocked, and leads to the creation of fewer Rydberg atoms than would otherwise be created. This suppression of excitation may help enable the use of single atoms as the bits in computer (neutral atom quantum computing). Quantum computers have the potential to revolutionize data security and encryption. The present project will focus on processes which make the Rydberg excitation blockade function less effectively (state-mixing interactions). Essentially, if one tries to put atoms into a given Rydberg state using a laser, the atoms will mix into other states. This mixing breaks the blockade and leads to an undesirably large number of Rydberg atoms. The goals of the present research are to quantify the extent to which state mixing interactions reduce the blockade efficiency, to understand the physical mechanism which gives rise to the mixing, and to study the experimental parameters which lead to the best excitation blockade. Understanding these issues will allow other researchers to use the blockade in a way that minimizes unwanted effects when developing a quantum computer. The project also involves a significant educational component. The PI will develop educational modules for a diverse group, ranging from general education students to advanced physics students. The PI will also study the impact of metacognitive exercises on problem solving performance in the introductory physics classroom. All work will be done at a primarily undergraduate university with a significant fraction of first-generation college students.

The Rydberg excitation blockade, a process whereby strong interactions among highly-excited atoms suppress laser excitation, has been at the heart of an array of recent experimental achievements. It has been suggested that state-mixing interactions, which result from couplings among multi-particle Rydberg states near a Förster resonance, may compromise the effectiveness of the excitation suppression under otherwise favorable conditions. Experimentally, however, the extent to which the blockade is compromised has been unknown, as large amounts of state mixing have always accompanied an improved blockade near resonance. In this project, the extent to which state-mixing reduces the blockade efficiency will be quantified using state-selective field ionization spectroscopy of rubidium Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap. This work will lead to a better understanding of the physical mechanism responsible for enhanced state-mixing. Additionally, the project will include a systematic study of the experimental conditions for the best blockade near a Förster resonance. The PI will design an eduational module on laser cooling and trapping for a general education course as well as an advanced laboratory experiment on characterizing an ultracold atom cloud in a magneto optical trap.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: ADVANCE - IT-START | Award Amount: 159.80K | Year: 2012

The PIs at Otterbein College will conduct a self assessment in the areas of bias/climate, service obligations, work-life balance, and issues surrounding invisible women (e.g., adjunct, part-time, those not well integrated into departments.) They will use existing data sources as well as subscribe to the COACHE survey. They will interview women who have left Otterbein, and convene focus groups of invisible women. They plan to institutionalize some data collection efforts. In addition they will utilize the existing mechanism of Professional Learning Communities to bring ADVANCE topics to the faculty. Otterbein is a PUI and aligns their activities well with the specific needs of PUIs. In particular the focus on ?invisible women? is very relevant as many institutions are increasing their non-tenure-track faculty, especially PUIs. Results could prove to have national significance.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ELEMENTARY PARTICLE ACCEL USER | Award Amount: 147.50K | Year: 2016

One of the major intellectual achievements of the 20th century was the development of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. This model succeeded in classifying all of the elementary particles known at the time into a hierarchy of groups having similar quantum properties. The validity of this model to date was recently confirmed by the discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. However, the Standard Model as it currently exists leaves open many questions about the universe, including such fundamental questions as to why the Higgs mass has the value it has and why there is no antimatter in the universe. A primary area to search for answers to these and other open questions about the universe, how it came to be and why it is the way it is, is to focus on a study of the properties of neutrinos and to use what we know and can learn about neutrinos as probes of science beyond the Standard Model. Neutrinos are those elementary particles that interact with practically nothing else in the universe. They have no electric charge and were once thought to be massless. Like other elementary particles, they were believed to have an antimatter counterpart, the antineutrino. Moreover, the Standard Model predicted that there were actually three different kinds of neutrinos that were distinguishable through the different interactions that they did undergo whenever there was an interaction. But recent measurements have totally changed our picture of neutrinos. We now know that neutrinos do have a mass and because they do, they can actually change from one type to another. Detailed measurements of these changes, along with other current neutrino experiments, form one of the most promising ways to probe for new physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM), and are the subject of this investigation. This research will involve the work of undergraduate students at an RUI.

This award supports work, using the neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), on three related neutrino experiments: MINERvA, Nova and MINOS+, all measuring neutrino oscillations: muon neutrino to electron neutrino transitions. To correctly measure these transitions, precise knowledge of neutrino interactions is required. This award will be used to measure (using the MINERvA detector) these interactions across a wide energy range available at FNAL. This will improve our knowledge of the neutrino flux, useful for future Short Baseline (detector near the source at FNAL) and Long Baseline (detector hundreds of kilometers away) experiments as well as the current Nova experiment. The work on the MINOS+ experiment will help map out the shape of the energy dependence of the neutrino oscillation probability, which could reveal new anomalies in the neutrino sector. A number of BSM proposed phenomena, from sterile neutrinos to extra dimensions, can cause measurable deviations in the neutrino oscillation probability in the 4-10GeV range.
A special contribution of this award and an exciting broader impact of this research program is the development and implementation of 3D visualization tools to guide the physics analyses of the experiments and to render visible to students and the public the nature of neutrino interactions as recorded and studied by scientists.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: ELEMENTARY PARTICLE ACCEL USER | Award Amount: 137.01K | Year: 2013

The Otterbein University group of Nathaniel Tagg and his team of undergraduate students will conduct research on neutrino oscillations and interactions using experiments in the Fermilab NuMI and Booster neutrino beams. The research program includes the study of neutrino oscillations (in the MINOS+ experiment), measuring neutrino nucleus cross sections (in the MINERvA experiment), measuring neutrino velocity (MINOS+), and searching for anomalous events that might indicate physics beyond the Standard Model (the MicroBooNE experiment). A special contribution of the group and an exciting broader impact of their research program is the development and implementation of 3D visualization tools to guide the physics analyses of the experiments and to render visible to students and the public the nature of neutrino interactions as recorded and studied by the scientists.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 241.25K | Year: 2013

This WIDER planning project is examining teaching, learning, and co-curricular evidence-based practices (EBPs) among underclass STEM majors and faculty at Otterbein University. Through an interdisciplinary initiative led by STEM practitioners and educational experts, the project is seeking to understand factors that influence the use and effectiveness of evidence-based practices for STEM students. These factors include faculty members knowledge and use of EBPs, barriers to implementation of EBPs, and impact of EBPs on student learning and retention, as well as the role of student confidence and culture on learning and persistence. The team is using a rigorous, mixed-method design that employs a combination of validated assessment methods, classroom observations, focus groups, and data mining, focusing on gateway courses for majors in Biology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, and Zoo & Conservation Science. The mixed-method design is informed by multiple change theories, including Senges model of learning organizations, and the results are being used to develop strategies for change at both the individual level (i.e., developing reflective teachers and disseminating curriculum and pedagogy) and the organizational level (i.e., enacting policy and developing a shared vision). The goal is to drive strategic, comprehensive reforms to the STEM programs at Otterbein and also to disseminate findings to other primarily undergraduate institutions in order to improve student learning and retention in STEM fields.

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