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News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Feb. 28, 2017) - The University of Ottawa Heart Institute has launched a new program for all patients waiting for coronary artery bypass surgery or heart valve replacement or repair. The program, called Cardiac PreHab, will help those patients to improve their health before a procedure. Cardiac rehabilitation, a comprehensive program to get patients healthy again after a heart attack, cardiac surgery or other cardiac events, has been shown to save lives. But the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI) now wants to find out if patients waiting for non-emergency heart surgery could start improving their health before their procedure, and if this could make their recovery easier and improve their outcomes after surgery. Portions of the new program have been in place for a while: patients waiting for outpatient procedures who come in for pre-admission appointments have long been connected with services such as smoking cessation, physiotherapy or social work on an ad hoc basis. But the PreHab program now aims to standardize these assessments and referrals, and to make them as comprehensive as possible for all patients waiting for outpatient surgery. "Rather than letting the waiting period for a procedure be one of inactivity and anxiety, PreHab can use that time to help patients become as ready as possible for their procedure," said Heather Sherrard, Executive Vice President of Clinical Operations and Chief Nursing Officer at the Heart Institute. "They may need to quit smoking, their diabetes may need to be better managed, they may be able to improve their diet or level of exercise. The PreHab program can help with all those issues to get these patients as fit and healthy as they can be." "Patients have a lot of misconceptions about what they should be doing before surgery," explained Jane Brownrigg, Clinical Manager of Cardiac Rehabilitation. "We talk to patients waiting for surgery who say 'My doctor told me to take it easy,' and they've interpreted that as 'Just sit on the couch'. Many think they should go on a diet, she continues, which can actually cause muscle loss-an unwanted side effect before any procedure." As patients complete PreHab, data will be gathered to evaluate the program and it will be possible to see if patients who come to PreHab are more likely to also register into cardiac rehab. There is a very high rate of enrollment for rehab at the Heart Institute compared to other centres across the country, but still only a little above half of all eligible patients enroll. Increasing that number is vital as rehab reduces morbidity and mortality rates and this new program may contribute to this improvement. An image is available at the following link: http://media3.marketwire.com/docs/benefits-of-cardiac-rehabilitation.png


Louie A.H.,Ottawa
International Journal of General Systems | Year: 2015

The plurality of process outputs is a genericity of Nature. In this paper, Natural Law receives a new mathematical formulation founded on two axioms: Everything is a set. and Every process is a set-valued mapping. I present a brief introduction to the algebraic theory of set-valued mappings, which culminates in two particular morphisms: the metabolism bundle and the imminence mapping. These are relations defined on the collection of processes of a natural system, and serve to characterize material entailment and functional entailment. Generalized metabolism is material entailment of (by-)products, and generalized repair is functional entailment of (side-)effects. Metabolism-Repair networks, hence equipped with set-valued processors, expand their role from models of biological entities to generic models of all natural systems. © 2014 Taylor and Francis.


Tjepkema M.,Ottawa
Health reports / Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information = Rapports sur la santé / Statistique Canada, Centre canadien d'information sur la santé | Year: 2011

Aboriginal peoples experience a disproportionate burden of disease, compared with other Canadians. However, relatively little information is available about mortality among Métis and non-Status Indians. This study calculates potential years of life lost before age 75 (PYLL) for people aged 25 to 74 by all-cause and cause-specific mortality, and examines the effect of socio-economic factors on premature mortality. Age-specific and age-standardized PYLL rates were calculated for 11,600 Métis, 5,400 non-Status Indians, and 2,475,700 non-Aboriginal adults based on the number of person-years at risk up to age 75. Métis and non-Status Indian adults had about twice the risk of dying before age 75, compared with non-Aboriginal adults. While the largest percentage of PYLL was due to non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, relative and absolute inequalities were greatest for injuries. Socioeconomic indicators such as income, education and employment explained a large share of the disparities in premature mortality. The results highlight the losses of potential years of life due to chronic diseases, as well as the possible importance of injury prevention programs for Métis and non-Status Indians.


Khashman N.,Ottawa
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2015

Localizing a website by incorporating culturally appropriate design features arguably helps it become more functional and usable for its users. This paper seeks to explore cultural reflections in government websites from Qatar using the influential cultural model of Geert Hofstede. Through using systematic content analysis, the examination focused on Web design elements which have been proven to be good indicators of preferences within cultural groups. The results showed that Arab culture which Qatar belongs to is somewhat reflected in the design of Qatari websites. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.


Tjepkema M.,Ottawa
Health reports / Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information = Rapports sur la santé / Statistique Canada, Centre canadien d'information sur la santé | Year: 2011

Previously, little information has been available about life expectancy and the probability of survival by socio-economic status or for Aboriginal groups. However, data from the 1991 to 2001 Canadian census mortality follow-up study made it possible to construct life tables for the non-institutional population aged 25 or older by a range of census variables. Those life tables have now been updated to include deaths through to the end of 2006. This report summarizes the updated findings. Life expectancy at age 25 and the probability of survival to age 75 tended to be low for people with low income and education, for residents of shelters, rooming houses and hotels, and for Registered Indians, non-Status Indians and Métis. In general, socio-economic disparities in mortality were greater for men than for women.


Ng E.,Ottawa
Health reports / Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information = Rapports sur la santé / Statistique Canada, Centre canadien d'information sur la santé | Year: 2011

According to the 2006 Census, almost the Canadian population were foreign-born, a percentage that is projected to reach at least 25% by 2031. Studies based on age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) have found a healthy immigrant effect, with lower overall rates among immigrants. A duration effect has also been observed-immigrants' mortality advantage lessened as their time in Canada increased. ASMRs based on the 1991 to 2001 census mortality follow-up study indicate a healthy immigrant effect and a duration effect at the national level for all-cause mortality for both sexes. However, at the national level, the mortality rate among women from the United States and from Sub-Saharan Africa was similar to that of Canadian-born women. For the three largest Census Metropolitan Areas (Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver), a healthy immigrant effect was not observed among women or among most men from the United States or Sub-Saharan Africa.


Garriguet D.,Ottawa | Colley R.C.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute
Health Reports | Year: 2012

The 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) collected directly measured physical activity on seven consecutive days for a representative sample of the population aged 6 to 79. Based on the CHMS, half of the active minutes in a day are accumulated between 11:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. For children, the most active period is lunch-time (11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.), and for teenagers aged 15 to 19, the after-school period (3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.). Children and youth are more active on weekdays than on weekends. Active children and youth tend to accumulate more minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity after school, whereas active adults do so at lunch time.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Dec. 13, 2016) - Ottawa will welcome the 9th Annual Ottawa Conference: State of the Art Clinical Approaches to Smoking Cessation where national and international experts in smoking cessation will share the latest concepts in clinical tobacco treatment, program development, and smoking cessation research.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - 28 fév. 2017) - L'Institut de cardiologie de l'Université d'Ottawa a lancé un nouveau programme à l'intention de ses patients en attente d'un pontage aortocoronarien ou d'un remplacement ou réparation de valvule cardiaque. Ce programme de « préadaptation cardiaque » aidera ces patients à optimiser leur santé avant l'intervention. Le programme de réadaptation cardiaque a pour but de remettre les patients sur pieds après une crise cardiaque, une chirurgie cardiaque ou d'autres événements cardiaques. Et de sauver des vies. L'Institut de cardiologie de l'Université d'Ottawa (ICUO) aimerait désormais que ses patients en attente d'une intervention chirurgicale non urgente commencent à améliorer leur santé avant l'intervention et espère que cela les aidera à faciliter leur convalescence et à améliorer les résultats de la chirurgie. Certains éléments de ce nouveau programme sont déjà en place depuis un certain temps : lors de leur rendez-vous au service de préadmission, les patients en attente d'une intervention d'un jour sont souvent, au besoin, dirigés vers un programme d'abandon du tabac, des services de physiothérapie ou encore vers un travailleur social. Dans le cadre du programme de préadaptation, ces évaluations et ces consultations sont faites automatiquement, et sont les plus exhaustives possible pour chaque patient en attente d'une chirurgie d'un jour. « Dans le cadre du programme de préadaptation, on invite les patients qui sont en attente d'une chirurgie à ne pas s'abandonner à l'inactivité et à l'anxiété et à utiliser plutôt ce temps pour se préparer le mieux possible, a déclaré Heather Sherrard, première vice-présidente et chef des soins cliniques et infirmiers à l'Institut de cardiologie. Parfois, ils doivent cesser de fumer, ou apprendre à mieux gérer leur diabète. Ils peuvent encore devoir améliorer leurs habitudes alimentaires, ou faire plus d'activité physique. Le programme de préadaptation vise à aider les patients à travailler sur ces aspects de leur santé et à se mettre en meilleure forme possible avant l'opération. » « Les patients ont beaucoup d'idées préconçues sur ce qu'ils doivent faire avant une chirurgie, souligne Jane Brownrigg, gestionnaire des services cliniques en réadaptation cardiaque. Certains patients nous disent que leur médecin leur a dit de relaxer. Ils pensent alors qu'ils doivent rester assis sur leur divan. D'autres pensent qu'ils doivent suivre un régime alors que cela peut provoquer une perte de masse musculaire, ce qu'on ne veut surtout pas voir avant une intervention chirurgicale. » Au fur et à mesure que les patients complètent le programme de préadaptation, des données seront colligées pour évaluer si effectivement, les patients qui y ont participé ont plus tendance à s'inscrire au programme de réadaptation par la suite. Le programme de réadaptation de l'Institut jouit déjà d'un très haut niveau de participation en comparaison avec d'autres centres de santé au pays, mais il n'y a encore qu'un peu plus de la moitié des patients admissibles qui s'inscrivent. Puisque le programme de réadaptation réduit les taux de morbidité et de mortalité, l'Institut juge crucial d'augmenter encore ce taux de participation et espère que ce nouveau programme y contribuera. Une image est disponible à l'adresse suivante : http://media3.marketwire.com/docs/les-bienfaits-de-la-readaptation-cardiaque.png


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - 13 déc. 2016) - La 9e Conférence annuelle d'Ottawa « Approches cliniques : nouvelles tendances en matière d'abandon du tabac » rassemblera prochainement des experts sur l'abandon du tabac de partout dans le monde. Ils exploreront ensemble les nouveautés en matière de traitement clinique du tabagisme, de développement des programmes et de recherche sur l'abandon du tabac.

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