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Ieta A.,Oswego State University College | Ieta A.,State University of New York at Oswego
ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2012

A capstone course comes as the peak experience for students in higher education programs. The challenge may sometime extend to their advisors as well. We report our experience with teaching a senior research project course to Physics students at a teaching university using a recently set up Applied Electrostatics Laboratory. The design of the course allowed for great flexibility in choosing independent research topics and performing the actual research. Students were introduced to the laboratory facilities, and to different topics related to electrosprays and nanotechnology. Each student was given time to choose an independent topic in accordance with his/her interests. Although working in relatively different directions, joint sessions greatly enhanced their perspective on the research and topics approached. Various challenges and solutions are discussed. Modest funds were available for independent projects and helped in shaping the research. Students designed experiments, collaborated, collected and analyzed data, participated in local and international conferences. Details of their unique experience, impressions, and enthusiasm are presented. The course was refreshing in terms of research performed at undergraduate level. We hope that our experience can be useful to others teaching similar courses. © 2012 American Society for Engineering Education. Source


Pantaleev A.,SUNY Oswego | Pantaleev A.,State University of New York at Oswego | Ieta A.,Oswego State University College | Ieta A.,State University of New York at Oswego | Ilie C.C.,State University of New York at Oswego
ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2012

Increasing student participation inside and outside the classroom is a desirable goal in education. Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is a promising educational methodology that has been shown to work for a wide variety of university courses and audiences, yet it has not been widely adopted in Computer Science. We describe an experiment that compares the use of JiTT in a high-level Computer Science course with its parallel use in two introductory Physics courses. JiTT was originally developed for use in introductory Physics courses, hence our use of such courses as the baseline for our comparison. We assess the method on three courses by applying and analyzing the results of a uniform exit survey distributed to all students involved. We demonstrate positive CS student perceptions of the methodology and similar JiTT-related student responses in the three courses. The method appears effective in increasing student ability and willingness to work independently whether in introductory or advanced courses. © 2012 American Society for Engineering Education. Source

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