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Pierini M.,Osteoarticular Regeneration Laboratory 3rd Orthopaedic and Traumatologic DivisionRizzoli Orthopaedic InstituteBologna40136 Italy | Lucarelli E.,Osteoarticular Regeneration Laboratory 3rd Orthopaedic and Traumatologic DivisionRizzoli Orthopaedic InstituteBologna40136 Italy | Duchi S.,Osteoarticular Regeneration Laboratory 3rd Orthopaedic and Traumatologic DivisionRizzoli Orthopaedic InstituteBologna40136 Italy | Donati D.,Osteoarticular Regeneration Laboratory 3rd Orthopaedic and Traumatologic DivisionRizzoli Orthopaedic InstituteBologna40136 Italy
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials | Year: 2015

The purpose of this study was to examine the in vitro cytocompatibility of a novel injectable multiphasic bone substitute (MBS) based on polysaccharide gel-coated OSPROLIFE® hydroxyapatite (HA)/tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) granules combined with bone marrow concentrate (BMC). Polysaccharide gel-coated granules loaded in syringe were combined with BMC diluted in ionic crosslinking solution. The product was then maintained in culture to investigate the cytocompatibility, distribution, and osteogenic differentiation function of cells contained in the BMC. The in vitro cytocompatibility was assessed after 0, 24, and 96 h from the injectable MBS preparation using the LIVE/DEAD® staining kit. The results highlighted that cells remained viable after combination with the polysaccharide gel-coated granules; also, viability was maintained over time. The distribution of the cells in the product, observed using confocal microscopy, showed viable cells immersed in the polysaccharide gel formed between the granules after ionic crosslinking. The mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) contained in the injectable MBS, the basic elements for bone tissue regeneration, were able to differentiate toward osteoblasts, producing an osteogenic matrix as evidenced by alizarin red-s (AR-S) staining. In conclusion, we found that the injectable MBS may have the potential to be used as a bone substitute by applying a "one-step" procedure in bone tissue engineering applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source

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