Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory

Spain

Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory

Spain

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Segura V.,University of Navarra | Medina-Aunon J.A.,CSIC - National Center for Biotechnology | Guruceaga E.,University of Navarra | Gharbi S.I.,CSIC - National Center for Biotechnology | And 19 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2013

The Chromosome 16 Consortium forms part of the Human Proteome Project that aims to develop an entire map of the proteins encoded by the human genome following a chromosome-centric strategy (C-HPP) to make progress in the understanding of human biology in health and disease (B/D-HPP). A Spanish consortium of 16 laboratories was organized into five working groups: Protein/Antibody microarrays, protein expression and Peptide Standard, S/MRM, Protein Sequencing, Bioinformatics and Clinical healthcare, and Biobanking. The project is conceived on a multicenter configuration, assuming the standards and integration procedures already available in ProteoRed-ISCIII, which is encompassed within HUPO initiatives. The products of the 870 protein coding genes in chromosome 16 were analyzed in Jurkat T lymphocyte cells, MCF-7 epithelial cells, and the CCD18 fibroblast cell line as it is theoretically expected that most chromosome 16 protein coding genes are expressed in at least one of these. The transcriptome and proteome of these cell lines was studied using gene expression microarray and shotgun proteomics approaches, indicating an ample coverage of chromosome 16. With regard to the B/D section, the main research areas have been adopted and a biobanking initiative has been designed to optimize methods for sample collection, management, and storage under normalized conditions and to define QC standards. The general strategy of the Chr-16 HPP and the current state of the different initiatives are discussed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Calamia V.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Lourido L.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Fernandez-Puente P.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Mateos J.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | And 6 more authors.
Arthritis Research and Therapy | Year: 2012

Introduction: Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is a symptomatic slow-acting drug for osteoarthritis (OA) widely used in the clinic. The aim of this work is to find proteins whose secretion from cartilage cells under proinflammatory stimuli (IL-1β) is regulated by CS, employing a novel quantitative proteomic approach.Methods: Human articular chondrocytes released from three normal cartilages were grown in SILAC medium. When complete incorporation of the heavy isotope was achieved, chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β 5 ng/ml with or without CS pretreatment (200 μg/ml). Forty-eight hours later, chondrocyte secretomes were analyzed by nano-scale liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses were employed to confirm some of the results.Results: We could identify 75 different proteins in the secretome of human articular chondrocytes. Eighteen of these were modulated by CS with statistical significance (six increased and 12 decreased). In normal chondrocytes stimulated with IL-1β, CS reduces inflammation directly by decreasing the presence of several complement components (CFAB, C1S, CO3, and C1R) and also indirectly by increasing proteins such as TNFα-induced protein (TSG6). TSG6 overexpression correlates with a decrease in pro-matrix metalloproteinase activation (observed in MMP1 and MMP3 levels). Finally, we observed a strong CS-dependent increase of an angiogenesis inhibitor, thrombospondin-1.Conclusion: We have generated a quantitative profile of chondrocyte extracellular protein changes driven by CS in the presence of IL-1β. We have also provided novel evidences of its anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-catabolic properties. Demonstration of the anti-angiogenic action of CS might provide a novel therapeutic approach for OA targeting. © 2012 Calamia et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Calamia V.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Calamia V.,University of La Coruña | Fernandez-Puente P.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Mateos J.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | And 9 more authors.
Molecular and Cellular Proteomics | Year: 2012

Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is a symptomatic slow acting drug for osteoarthritis (OA) widely used for the treatment of this highly prevalent disease, characterized by articular cartilage degradation. However, little is known about its mechanism of action, and recent large scale clinical trials have reported variable results on OA symptoms. Herein, we aimed to study the modulations in the intracellular proteome and the secretome of human articular cartilage cells (chondrocytes) treated with three different CS compounds, with different origin or purity, by two complementary proteomic approaches. Osteoarthritic cells were treated with 200 μg/ml of each brand of CS. Quantitative proteomics experiments were carried out by the DIGE and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) techniques, followed by LC-MALDI-MS/MS analysis. The DIGE study, carried out on chondrocyte whole cell extracts, led to the detection of 46 spots that were differential between conditions in our study: 27 were modulated by CS1, 4 were modulated by CS2, and 15 were modulated by CS3. The SILAC experiment, carried out on the subset of chondrocyte-secreted proteins, allowed us to identify 104 different proteins. Most of them were extracellular matrix components, and 21 were modulated by CS1, 13 were modulated by CS2, and 9 were modulated by CS3. Each of the studied compounds induces a characteristic protein profile in OA chondrocytes. CS1 displayed the widest effect but increased the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, and some catabolic or inflammatory factors like interstitial collagenase, stromelysin-1, and pentraxin-related protein. CS2 and CS3, on the other hand, increased a number of structural proteins, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins. Our study shows how, from the three CS compounds tested, CS1 induces the activation of inflammatory and catabolic pathways, whereas CS2 and CS3 induce an anti-inflammatory and anabolic response. The data presented emphasize the importance of employing high quality CS compounds, supported by controlled clinical trials, in the therapy of OA. Finally, the present work exemplifies the usefulness of proteomic approaches in pharmacological studies. © 2012 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.


Segura V.,University of Navarra | Medina-Aunon J.A.,CSIC - National Center for Biotechnology | Mora M.I.,University of Navarra | Martinez-Bartolome S.,CSIC - National Center for Biotechnology | And 44 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2014

The Spanish team of the Human Proteome Project (SpHPP) marked the annotation of Chr16 and data analysis as one of its priorities. Precise annotation of Chromosome 16 proteins according to C-HPP criteria is presented. Moreover, Human Body Map 2.0 RNA-Seq and Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) data sets were used to obtain further information relative to cell/tissue specific chromosome 16 coding gene expression patterns and to infer the presence of missing proteins. Twenty-four shotgun 2D-LC-MS/MS and gel/LC-MS/MS MIAPE compliant experiments, representing 41% coverage of chromosome 16 proteins, were performed. Furthermore, mapping of large-scale multicenter mass spectrometry data sets from CCD18, MCF7, Jurkat, and Ramos cell lines into RNA-Seq data allowed further insights relative to correlation of chromosome 16 transcripts and proteins. Detection and quantification of chromosome 16 proteins in biological matrices by SRM procedures are also primary goals of the SpHPP. Two strategies were undertaken: one focused on known proteins, taking advantage of MS data already available, and the second, aimed at the detection of the missing proteins, is based on the expression of recombinant proteins to gather MS information and optimize SRM methods that will be used in real biological samples. SRM methods for 49 known proteins and for recombinant forms of 24 missing proteins are reported in this study. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Rodriguez-Lorenzo A.,Uppsala University Hospital | Arufe M.C.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Arufe M.C.,University of La Coruña | De La Fuente A.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | And 2 more authors.
Annals of Plastic Surgery | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: In this article, the authors investigated whether the prefabrication of an autologous pedicled flap by isolation from the surrounding with artificial skin substitutes would increase mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeding. METHODS: Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from human umbilical cords and were cultured and characterized by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Oxacarbocyanine and its green fluorescence emission were used to label the MSCs population.Sixteen adult Wistar rats were randomized in 4 groups (n = 4 animals per group). In group 1, a prefabricated groin flap (GF) with skin substitutes was harvested without cell injection; in group 2, 1 million MSCs were injected subcutaneously in the area corresponding to the GF without flap harvesting; in Group 3, a prefabricated GF with skin substitutes was harvested and 1 million MSCs were injected subcutaneously; and in Group 4, a prefabricated GF with skin substitutes was harvested and 2 million MSCs were injected subcutaneously. All procedures were performed bilaterally in each animal. Animals were sacrificed 2 weeks after the surgery. Flap viability was then assessed by clinical inspection and histology, and seeding of MSCs was observed. RESULTS: All flaps survived 2 weeks after the surgery. Oxacarbocyanine-labeled cells were found in all prefabricated flaps injected (Groups 3 and 4) in higher number in comparison with the group where subcutaneous injection without flap harvesting was performed (Group 2). This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Prefabricated skin flaps with skin substitutes may provide a useful vehicle for the implantation of MSCs to serve as an autologous microvascular bioscaffold.Copyright © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Calamia V.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Ruiz-Romero C.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Rocha B.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Fernandez-Puente P.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | And 2 more authors.
Arthritis Research and Therapy | Year: 2010

Introduction: Chondroitin sulfate (CS) and glucosamine sulfate (GS) are symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (OA) widely used in clinic. Despite their widespread use, knowledge of the specific molecular mechanisms of their action is limited. The aim of this work is to explore the utility of a pharmacoproteomic approach for the identification of specific molecules involved in the pharmacological effect of GS and CS.Methods: Chondrocytes obtained from three healthy donors were treated with GS 10 mM and/or CS 200 μg/mL, and then stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) 10 ng/mL. Whole cell proteins were isolated 24 hours later and resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The gels were stained with SYPRORuby. Modulated proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to validate our results.Results: A total of 31 different proteins were altered by GS or/and CS treatment when compared to control. Regarding their predicted biological function, 35% of the proteins modulated by GS are involved in signal transduction pathways, 15% in redox and stress response, and 25% in protein synthesis and folding processes. Interestingly, CS affects mainly energy production (31%) and metabolic pathways (13%), decreasing the expression levels of ten proteins. The chaperone GRP78 was found to be remarkably increased by GS alone and in combination with CS, a fact that unveils a putative mechanism for the reported anti-inflammatory effect of GS in OA. On the other hand, the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) was significantly decreased by both drugs and synergistically by their combination, thus suggesting a drug-induced decrease of the oxidative stress caused by IL-1β in chondrocytes.Conclusions: CS and GS differentially modulate the proteomic profile of human chondrocytes. This pharmacoproteomic approach unravels the complex intracellular mechanisms that are modulated by these drugs on IL1β-stimulated human articular chondrocytes. © 2010 Calamia et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Arufe M.C.,Health Science University | Arufe M.C.,Universitario run A | De La Fuente A.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory | Mateos J.,Universitario run A | And 5 more authors.
Stem Cells and Development | Year: 2011

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from umbilical cord stroma were isolated by plastic adherence and characterized by flow cytometry, looking for cells positive for OCT3/4 and SSEA-4 as well as the classic MSC markers CD44, CD73, CD90, Ki67, CD105, and CD106 and negative for CD34 and CD45. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the genes ALP, MEF2C, MyoD, LPL, FAB4, and AMP, characteristic for the differentiated lineages, were used to evaluate early and late differentiation of 3 germ lines. Direct chondrogenic differentiation was achieved through spheroid formation by MSCs in a chondrogenic medium and the presence of chondrogenic markers at 4, 7, 14, 28, and 46 days of culture was tested. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses were utilized to assess the expression of collagen type I, collagen type II, and collagen type X throughout the time studied. We found expression of all the markers as early as 4 days of chondrogenic differentiation culture, with their expression increasing with time, except for collagen type I, which decreased in expression in the formed spheroids after 4 days of differentiation. The signaling role of Wnt during chondrogenic differentiation was studied by western blot. We observed that β-catenin expression decreased during the chondrogenic process. Further, a secretome study to validate our model of differentiation in vitro was performed on spheroids formed during the chondrogenesis process. Our results indicate the multipotential capacity of this source of human cells; their chondrogenic capacity could be useful for future cell therapy in articular diseases. © 2011 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Calamia V.,Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory
Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP | Year: 2012

Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is a symptomatic slow acting drug for osteoarthritis (OA) widely used for the treatment of this highly prevalent disease, characterized by articular cartilage degradation. However, little is known about its mechanism of action, and recent large scale clinical trials have reported variable results on OA symptoms. Herein, we aimed to study the modulations in the intracellular proteome and the secretome of human articular cartilage cells (chondrocytes) treated with three different CS compounds, with different origin or purity, by two complementary proteomic approaches. Osteoarthritic cells were treated with 200 μg/ml of each brand of CS. Quantitative proteomics experiments were carried out by the DIGE and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) techniques, followed by LC-MALDI-MS/MS analysis. The DIGE study, carried out on chondrocyte whole cell extracts, led to the detection of 46 spots that were differential between conditions in our study: 27 were modulated by CS1, 4 were modulated by CS2, and 15 were modulated by CS3. The SILAC experiment, carried out on the subset of chondrocyte-secreted proteins, allowed us to identify 104 different proteins. Most of them were extracellular matrix components, and 21 were modulated by CS1, 13 were modulated by CS2, and 9 were modulated by CS3. Each of the studied compounds induces a characteristic protein profile in OA chondrocytes. CS1 displayed the widest effect but increased the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, and some catabolic or inflammatory factors like interstitial collagenase, stromelysin-1, and pentraxin-related protein. CS2 and CS3, on the other hand, increased a number of structural proteins, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins. Our study shows how, from the three CS compounds tested, CS1 induces the activation of inflammatory and catabolic pathways, whereas CS2 and CS3 induce an anti-inflammatory and anabolic response. The data presented emphasize the importance of employing high quality CS compounds, supported by controlled clinical trials, in the therapy of OA. Finally, the present work exemplifies the usefulness of proteomic approaches in pharmacological studies.


PubMed | Osteoarticular and Aging Research Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP | Year: 2012

Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is a symptomatic slow acting drug for osteoarthritis (OA) widely used for the treatment of this highly prevalent disease, characterized by articular cartilage degradation. However, little is known about its mechanism of action, and recent large scale clinical trials have reported variable results on OA symptoms. Herein, we aimed to study the modulations in the intracellular proteome and the secretome of human articular cartilage cells (chondrocytes) treated with three different CS compounds, with different origin or purity, by two complementary proteomic approaches. Osteoarthritic cells were treated with 200 g/ml of each brand of CS. Quantitative proteomics experiments were carried out by the DIGE and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) techniques, followed by LC-MALDI-MS/MS analysis. The DIGE study, carried out on chondrocyte whole cell extracts, led to the detection of 46 spots that were differential between conditions in our study: 27 were modulated by CS1, 4 were modulated by CS2, and 15 were modulated by CS3. The SILAC experiment, carried out on the subset of chondrocyte-secreted proteins, allowed us to identify 104 different proteins. Most of them were extracellular matrix components, and 21 were modulated by CS1, 13 were modulated by CS2, and 9 were modulated by CS3. Each of the studied compounds induces a characteristic protein profile in OA chondrocytes. CS1 displayed the widest effect but increased the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, and some catabolic or inflammatory factors like interstitial collagenase, stromelysin-1, and pentraxin-related protein. CS2 and CS3, on the other hand, increased a number of structural proteins, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins. Our study shows how, from the three CS compounds tested, CS1 induces the activation of inflammatory and catabolic pathways, whereas CS2 and CS3 induce an anti-inflammatory and anabolic response. The data presented emphasize the importance of employing high quality CS compounds, supported by controlled clinical trials, in the therapy of OA. Finally, the present work exemplifies the usefulness of proteomic approaches in pharmacological studies.

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