Oslo, Norway

Oslo University College , Norwegian: Høgskolen i Oslo was the largest state university college in Norway, with more than 18,000 students and approx. 1800 employees. OUC offers the broadest portfolio of professional studies available in Norway.OUC was established August 1, 1994 when the Norwegian college system was restructured and 18 smaller colleges in the Oslo area merged. Most of the school was now located in the city centre of Oslo along Pilestredet street. The main campus was the previous Frydenlund Brewery near Bislett stadium.Oslo University College and Akershus University College merged into Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied science on August 1, 2011.The language of instruction was Norwegian, and certain courses were taught in English. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ISSI-5-2015 | Award Amount: 3.64M | Year: 2016

The RRI-Practice project will bring together a unique group of international experts in RRI to understand the barriers and drivers to the successful implementation of RRI both in European and global contexts; to promote reflection on organisational structures and cultures of research conducting and research funding organisations; and to identify and support best practices to facilitate the uptake of RRI in organisations and research programmes. The project will review RRI related work in 22 research conducting and research funding organisations and will develop RRI Outlooks outlining RRI objectives, targets and indicators for each organisation. It will involve comparative analysis of the five EC keys of RRI locating these within broader, evolving discourses on RRI. Within each identified RRI dimension the project will analyse how the topic has developed in particular social and institutional contexts, how the RRI concept and configuration meshes, overlaps and challenges existing organisational practices and cultures, leading to an analysis of the barriers and drivers associated with operationalising and implementing RRI. 12 national case studies will allow for in depth studies of, and dialogue with, the included organisations, and will form the basis for systematic analysis and comparison of drivers, barriers and best practices on each dimension of RRI. The project design also allows analysis of such drivers, barriers and best practices related to national and organisational characteristics, safeguarding the need to take into account diversity and pluralism in regional RRI programs. These analyses will ultimately end up in recommendations to the EC about effective, efficient and targeted strategies for increasing RRI uptake in different kinds of organisations and national cultures, in Europe and in selected major S&T intensive economies worldwide. The project will also develop user-friendly guidance aimed directly at research and funding organisations themselves.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: GARRI-5-2014 | Award Amount: 1.99M | Year: 2015

Research integrity is a growing concern among scientists, research organisations, policy makers, and the public, expressed in a proliferation of ethical codes, guidelines, and procedures. While this proliferation calls for harmonisation and coordination, there is little factual knowledge about the actual processes leading to misconduct or the effectiveness of current integrity policies. PRINTEGER analyses the incidence and individual, social, and organisational causes and dynamics of misconduct. It also analyses how institutions respond to allegations, specifically in interaction with neighbouring law, the media, complex research organisations, and systemic changes in research. From the perspective of the research work floor, including the daily work of journal editors or research managers, PRINTEGER will analyse how current instruments of integrity policy operate in practice. How do guidelines most contribute to integrity? What other instruments and procedures will promote integrity? PRINTEGER will provide concrete tools and advice to promote research integrity in Europe through four specific target groups: advice on an optimal policy mix and opportunities for harmonisation to research policy makers; best practice approaches to foster integrity for research leaders and managers; advice on the use of IT tools and organisational measures for research support organisations; practice-informed educational tools for ethical training and reflection of early career scientists. PRINTEGER uses a unique approach that looks at procedures and guidelines, but also analyses how they operate in the context of daily research practice. For this purpose, PRINTEGER gathers not only ethicists, but also very pertinent expertise that has barely informed integrity policy so far: legal studies, scientometrics, and social sciences, such as criminology and media studies; all flanked by intensive stakeholder consultation and dissemination activities to maximise impact.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-20-2015 | Award Amount: 6.91M | Year: 2016

Strength2Food is a 5-year, 6.9 million project to improve the effectiveness of EU food quality schemes (FQS), public sector food procurement (PSFP) and to stimulate Short Food Supply Chains (SFSC) through research, innovation and demonstration activities. Our 30-partner consortium representing 11 EU and 4 non-EU countries combines leading academic, communication, SME and stakeholder organisations to ensure a multi-actor approach. It will undertake case study-based quantitative research to measure economic, environmental and social impacts of FQS, PSFP and SFSC. The impact of PSFP policies on balanced nutrition in schools will also be assessed. Primary research will be complemented by advanced econometric analysis of existing datasets to determine impacts of FQS and SFSC participation on farm performance and survival, as well as understand price transmission and trade patterns. Consumer knowledge, confidence in, valuation and use of FQS labels and products will be assessed via cross-national survey, ethnographic and virtual supermarket-based research. Lessons from the research will be applied and verified in 6 pilot initiatives, focusing on less-developed and transition regions. These initiatives bring together academic and non-academic stakeholder partners in action research. The six pilot actions are: a school meals initiative to improve the nutritional outcomes and economic benefits for local agri-food producers; in-store trials (undertaken with a grocery retailer) to upscale sales of local produce; a scheme to stimulate a sustainable SFSC that adds value to the fishing community; and pilot actions to expand regional food labelling; increase sales of FQS products in non-traditional markers; and improve returns to local producers at food fairs and farmers markets (via a smartphone app). Project impact will be maximised through a knowledge exchange platform, hybrid forums, school educational resources, a Massive Open Online Course and practitioner recommendations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2013.8.2 | Award Amount: 1.45M | Year: 2014

LACE partners are passionate about the opportunities afforded by current and future views of learning analytics (LA) and EDM but we are concerned about missed opportunities, undesirable consequences of mis-application, investment funding failing to realise value, market failure, etc. LACE is our response, a project proposal to reduce risk and to increase benefit through an approach that accounts for the necessary unity of research, policy and practice.LACE comprises a range of activities designed to actively and passively integrate communities that are conducting LA/EDM research, early practitioner adopters, and those who are building first-generation commercial or open-source software. This integration would be used to stimulate creativity and accelerate the identification of viable and effective solutions to real problems, and hence to drive both current research and technology transfer.LACE will create and curate a knowledge base of evidence. This will capture evidence for the effectiveness and the relative desirability of the outcomes resulting from use of various tools and techniques.LACE will actively participate in the exploration of plausible futures for learning analytics and EDM by combining the creation of imaginative scenarios with participatory workshops and structured methods including a Policy Delphi to assess differences of opinion about the feasibility and desirability of possible future states, thus informing future research and policy agendas.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: YOUNG-1-2014 | Award Amount: 2.92M | Year: 2015

Through an innovative use of four key concepts (resilience, capability, active agency and negotiation) and primary data (life course interviews, vignette experiments), NEGOTIATE will deliver gender-sensitive comparative knowledge about consequences of early job insecurity. We move beyond the state-of-the-art by investigating the linkages across macro, meso and micro levels as mechanisms of early job insecurity. General labour market processes and a severe employment crisis currently define the macro level. The micro level is characterised by young people with unequal opportunities to influence individual job prospects. The organisation of meso level structures creates differential access to public and private support within and across countries. NEGOTIATEs core question is how young peoples scope for agency interacts with different layers of structural conditions in a multi-level governance system. By actively involving national and European stakeholders including young people NEGOTIATE will contribute to policies that promote the employability of young Europeans, thus maximising societal and scientific impact. We will observe the present, learn from the past and project the future to inform policies that help prevent early labour market exclusion and adverse effects of job insecurity in the short and long term, thereby leading Europe closer to the Europe 2020 goals. A trans-disciplinary Consortium of nine research institutions from BG, CZ, DE, EL, NO, PL, ES, CH, UK and one international CSO will implement NEGOTIATE. The participating countries are differently affected by the economic crisis and display historical variations across key institutional factors, such as welfare state arrangements, employment relations and youth transition regimes. The participation of SOLIDAR will strengthen NEGOTIATEs policy impact. Overall, the participants wide set of research skills enable a rich combination of advanced quantitative and qualitative comparative analyses.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FCT-14-2014 | Award Amount: 5.00M | Year: 2015

The challenges of international police reform assistance are formidable. Conventional top-down institutional reform has proven neither effective nor sustainable. Community-based policing (COP) holds promise, however evaluations have pointed to a lack of in-depth understanding of police-community relations in police reform assistance. This project will conduct integrated social and technical research on COP in post-conflict countries in S.E. Europe, Asia, Africa and Central America. New knowledge, reflection on lessons learnt and best practices will support both national police and EU/International police reform assistance. The project will lead to a better understanding of police-community relations, and innovation in information and communication technology (ICT) for enhancing these relations in post-conflict countries undergoing serious security reform. Linking social and technological research, the project will study social, cultural, human security, legal and ethical dimensions of COP to understand how citizens and police can develop sustainable relations with the use of ICTs. We will explore how technological innovation can support COP in crime reporting and prevention. The project will explore ICT solutions to facilitate, strengthen and accelerate positive COP efforts and police-citizen interactions where trust levels are weak. Solutions will depend on the context and identified needs of end-users: communities, local police, national and international police (EU/UN), and policymakers, and may include citizen reporting, information monitoring, mobile value transfer, or improved organizational systems. The project includes a Policing Experts Network whose role is to support research planning, and dissemination and exploitation of findings, grounding the research in police practice. This will ensure findings are communicated by engaged police practitioners, and directly applied in COP education and training curricula in Europe and case countries.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: LCE-20-2014 | Award Amount: 2.05M | Year: 2015

Residential energy consumption represents the 28% of all EU consumption and if commercial buildings are also considered this percentage increases to 40% (36% of EU CO2 emissions). In this context, is clear that the reduction of consumption in the residential sector should play an important role in energy efficiency programmes and policies as is stated in the recent Energy Efficiency Directive 2012/27/EU. Most energy efficiency measures implemented in Europe involved technological interventions. In contrast, everyday energy-consuming behaviours are largely habitual and therefore the potential of energy savings at home with actions focused in consumer behaviour is really promising. In this context the provision of feedback to consumers has resulted in really promising results, achieving savings in the range of 5-20%. But some limitations exists. The aim of this project is to fill the gaps and advanced in this context, being an essential preparatory activity for the future large scale demonstration of feedback methodologies. The key aim of this project is to develop an advanced and integral user-centred framework for the implementation of efficient energy feedback programmes in the domestic area. Our approach relies in the complete characterisation of the EU energy consumer, and the design of specific personalised actions tailored to each consumer pattern detected based on the use of natural language and emotional contents. NATCONSUMERS will set the scenario to allow strengthening the dialogue between the EU energy system stakeholders in order to define robustness methodologies exploiting to the maximum the potential of energy feedback approaches, filling the existing gaps not still covered by previous pilots and experiments. NATCONSUMERS consortium brings together representatives of all stakeholders and areas involved in the project. A concise dissemination and awareness programme is proposed to reach the target communities and increase the impact of the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH.2013.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 6.46M | Year: 2014

The overriding aim of this project is to conduct a comparative EU wide analysis on youth unemployment that is sensitive to gender, ethnic and class differences and the historical legacies of multi-level institutions shaping relevant policies. This aim will be achieved through 10 objectives organized around 12 research, management, dissemination and scientific coordination work packages. There are three cross-cutting research WPs that examine Performance, Policy Learning and its limitations and include the production of an International Handbook on Strategic Transitions for Youth Labour in Europe; Six substantive research WPs focus on issues of: Labour Market Mismatch in terms of education and skills as well as geographical mobility; Family and Cultural barriers to employment and, the opportunities and consequences of Self-Employment and Flexicurity. The central concept informing this project is based on a policy learning approach to address youth unemployment. This involves an ongoing process of including a wide range of EU stakeholders to inform the research and disseminate the results in different institutional conditions. It provides a recent historical analysis accounting for factors prior to, and following on from, the on-going economic crisis. It informs policy makers about of what works and why. The consortium will achieve the expected impact of 1) advancing the knowledge base of employment strategies to overcome youth unemployment, defining measures, methods and evaluations, 2) creating a critical network of stakeholder organisation. Outputs will include: An International Handbook on Strategic Transitions for Youth Labour in Europe. Multimedia dissemination: working papers, policy briefings, newsletters, press coverage and video podcasts. A comparative analyses of where and under which circumstances innovative and effective policies for getting young people into work are evident, where these policies work and why; Policy recommendations, from both case studies and quantitative analysis, on the impacts of these employment strategies; Timely and professional dissemination to key stakeholders facilitated by the partner EurActiv. Three WPs focus on the management, dissemination and scientific coordination of the project to achieve these objectives and outputs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2012.3.2-2 | Award Amount: 3.06M | Year: 2013

DISCIT aims to produce new knowledge enabling Member States, affiliated European countries and the European Union to achieve full and effective participation of persons with disabilities in society and the economy. In investigating the social and political conditions for making such participation a reality, the project adopts a multifaceted understanding of Active Citizenship. Adopting a multilevel and institutional perspective, DISCIT examines how different types of policies (social benefits, social services and social regulation instruments) can be mutually supportive in enhancing Active Citizenship for persons with disabilities. Using the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) as a framework of reference, DISCIT identifies more effective ways to remove and prevent physical, attitudinal, social and organisational barriers to Active Citizenship and participation on an equal basis with others, in a context of rapid social and economic change and evolving conceptions of disability across European societies. DISCIT synthesises policy lessons from a strategic sample of European states: Liberal (Ireland, United Kingdom), Conservative (Germany, Italy), Social Democratic (Norway, Sweden) and Post-Communist (Czech Republic, Serbia) regimes. DISCIT involves consortium members from all these countries in addition to Switzerland and Belgium. DISCITs results provide new insight into how the European Union can support Member States and affiliated European countries in working towards the realization of the rights of persons with disabilities as expressed in the Fundamental Rights under the EC Treaty and the CRPD. By clarifying the possibilities for a strengthened synergy between policies at diverse levels of governance, DISCIT contributes to knowledge for realizing the ambitions of the EU Disability Strategy 2010-2020 and the Europe 2020 Strategy for Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive Growth. DISCIT has a duration of 36 months; is coordinated by Norwegian Social Research (NOVA); the consortium members are universities, research institutes and two civil society organisations (EDF and MDRI-S). The consortium is supported by a Scientific Advisory Committee with distinguished members mainly from countries not covered by the consortium members, a European Stakeholder Committee and eight National Stakeholder Committees. www.discit.eu


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EURO-3-2014 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2015

The current crisis has indirectly contributed to questioning the efficiency of financial markets and democratic institutions at European and national levels. Recent data from the Eurobarometer (July 2013) shows a continuous decrease in the trust levels that citizens from the European Union have on national governments and parliaments, radically decreasing in more than 25 points in the last six years (European Commission, 2013). This situation is jeopardizing the European project while at the same time a lively public debate about the meaning of European identity is taking place across Europe. Several social scientists have argued that the social and economic inequalities in the new global order are contributing to civil social reactions, based on solidarity, aiming to achieve a better society for all (Touraine, 2007; Wright, 2010). This project aims to analyzing in depth the acts of solidarity which are being developed across Europe, the extent to which they respond to dialogic and inclusive processes, the related outcomes and the policy developments. The project starts from previous findings on successful actions which are combating the crisis by creating employment or improving access to health through acts of solidarity. These acts are thus contributing to construct more inclusive and prosperous societies, by influencing at the macro-level (social inequalities) and micro-level (psychological wellbeing). In this regard, the research will identify common elements among these acts in order to examine their transferability to different contexts. To cover this objective, effects of these actions in five social areas will be studied in depth: housing, education, employment, engagement and health. Simultaneously, special attention will be paid on social investment policies which are supporting these initiatives.

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