Time filter

Source Type

Fatou B.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Fatou B.,CNRS Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory | Saudemont P.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Leblanc E.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 10 more authors.
Scientific Reports | Year: 2016

Here we describe a new instrument (SpiderMass) designed for in vivo and real-time analysis. In this instrument ion production is performed remotely from the MS instrument and the generated ions are transported in real-time to the MS analyzer. Ion production is promoted by Resonant Infrared Laser Ablation (RIR-LA) based on the highly effective excitation of O-H bonds in water molecules naturally present in most biological samples. The retrieved molecular patterns are specific to the cell phenotypes and benign versus cancer regions of patient biopsies can be easily differentiated. We also demonstrate by analysis of human skin that SpiderMass can be used under in vivo conditions with minimal damage and pain. Furthermore SpiderMass can also be used for real-time drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (DMPK) analysis or food safety topics. SpiderMass is thus the first MS based system designed for in vivo real-time analysis under minimally invasive conditions.


Borghesi Y.,Cancer Center Oscar Lambret | Narducci F.,Cancer Center Oscar Lambret | Bresson L.,Cancer Center Oscar Lambret | Tresch E.,Cancer Center Oscar Lambret | And 5 more authors.
Annals of Surgical Oncology | Year: 2015

Purpose: In November 2010, the French National Cancer Institute published new guidelines for managing endometrial cancer. Pelvic lymphadenectomy is not indicated for preoperative low–intermediate risk type 1 endometrial cancer, and high-risk patients should undergo secondary surgery with para-aortic lymphadenectomy. This study evaluated these new guidelines with regard to overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and morbidity for patients with low–intermediate risk disease. Methods: We evaluated all type 1 endometrial cancer patients with low–intermediate risk of recurrence who were treated from 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2012. All patients were classified according to the 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging criteria and the European Society for Medical Oncology. Results: Overall, 230 patients were included (159 before and 71 after the new guidelines were issued). Pelvic lymphadenectomies were performed before and after the new guidelines in 77.4 and 28.6 % of patients, respectively (p < 0.001). After 2010, eight patients also underwent secondary surgery, which consisted of a para-aortic lymphadenectomy for lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI). This second surgery changed the adjuvant treatment for one patient. OS and RFS were similar between both groups, and no difference in morbidity was observed between the groups. LVSI was an independent factor for OS [hazard ratio (HR) 7.2, 95 % CI 3.1–17; p < 0.001] and RFS (HR 3.7, 95 % CI 1.6–8.5; p < 0.003). Conclusions: Fewer pelvic lymphadenectomies in low–intermediate risk patients did not affect OS, RFS, or morbidity, including patients with secondary surgery. We must gather additional data with a longer follow-up period to not only confirm our results but to also fully investigate the paradoxical absence of decreased morbidity that our study has shown. © 2015, Society of Surgical Oncology.


PubMed | Cancer Center Oscar Lambret
Type: | Journal: Annals of surgical oncology | Year: 2015

In November 2010, the French National Cancer Institute published new guidelines for managing endometrial cancer. Pelvic lymphadenectomy is not indicated for preoperative low-intermediate risk type 1 endometrial cancer, and high-risk patients should undergo secondary surgery with para-aortic lymphadenectomy. This study evaluated these new guidelines with regard to overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and morbidity for patients with low-intermediate risk disease.We evaluated all type 1 endometrial cancer patients with low-intermediate risk of recurrence who were treated from 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2012. All patients were classified according to the 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging criteria and the European Society for Medical Oncology.Overall, 230 patients were included (159 before and 71 after the new guidelines were issued). Pelvic lymphadenectomies were performed before and after the new guidelines in 77.4 and 28.6 % of patients, respectively (p < 0.001). After 2010, eight patients also underwent secondary surgery, which consisted of a para-aortic lymphadenectomy for lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI). This second surgery changed the adjuvant treatment for one patient. OS and RFS were similar between both groups, and no difference in morbidity was observed between the groups. LVSI was an independent factor for OS [hazard ratio (HR) 7.2, 95 % CI 3.1-17; p < 0.001] and RFS (HR 3.7, 95 % CI 1.6-8.5; p < 0.003).Fewer pelvic lymphadenectomies in low-intermediate risk patients did not affect OS, RFS, or morbidity, including patients with secondary surgery. We must gather additional data with a longer follow-up period to not only confirm our results but to also fully investigate the paradoxical absence of decreased morbidity that our study has shown.

Loading Cancer Center Oscar Lambret collaborators
Loading Cancer Center Oscar Lambret collaborators