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LEXINGTON, KY, United States

Patent
Orthopeutics, Lp | Date: 2011-05-26

A method of treating a tear in a knee meniscus of a patient. The method includes exposing the torn knee meniscus to a protein crosslinker during surgery to repair the tear. Also provided is a fixation device for the surgical repair of tears of the meniscus of the knee, where the device contains one or more protein crosslinking reagents.


Patent
Orthopeutics, Lp | Date: 2015-04-13

A method of treating a tear in a knee meniscus of a patient. The method includes exposing the torn knee meniscus to a protein crosslinker during surgery to repair the tear. Also provided is a fixation device for the surgical repair of tears of the meniscus of the knee, where the device contains one or more protein crosslinking reagents.


Patent
Orthopeutics, Lp | Date: 2014-02-12

A protein crosslinker delivery device includes a body and a protein crosslinker held in a synthetic or natural biodegradable polymer. The body, a coating on the body, or an attachment to the body can contain the protein crosslinker holding biodegradable polymer. The release rate of the crosslinker and total amount of crosslinker released can be controlled by varying the concentration of the crosslinker and by varying the composition and structural characteristics of the degradable polymer. Surface eroding, bulk eroding and naturally occurring biodegradable polymers can be used in conjunction with a variety of nontoxic or minimally-toxic protein crosslinking agents. The devices can be used to treat mechanically damaged, deformed, and nutritionally deficient connective or soft tissues such as the knee meniscus, the spinal disc, the cornea, ligaments and tendons, the soft palate, and skin.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 244.90K | Year: 2013

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Snoring is a condition that affects people of all ages, with a reported prevalence of up to 48% of men and 34% of women. Snoring poses not only an inconvenience with regard to sleep-cycle disruption of the sufferer's bed partner and family, but it can also lead to sleep-deprivation in the sufferer and to a more serious and sometimes life-threatening condition, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), where breathing is interrupted during sleep by physical obstruction ofthe airway. Prevalence of OSAS in the United States has been estimated at 4.2% for those aged 16 and older, or approximately 10 million individuals. Both snoring and OSAS are in most cases the result of obstructed airflow due to abnormalities in the geometry of the air passages and the propensity for aberrant deformation of the soft palate. Repeated trauma to the soft palate due to snoring can be expected to increase its passive deformability and damage muscle fibers and peripheral nerve fibers, increasingthe tendency for obstruction. Thus, treatment of snoring can play an important role in reducing the incidence of OSAS. Current treatments include surgery, the use of oral appliances, and more recently, minimally invasive procedures targeted at stiffeningthe soft palate. All of the newer procedures rely to some extent on the formation of fibrotic scar tissue to stiffen the soft palate. This fibrotic tissue can be expected to exhibit inferior mechanical properties and loss of structural integrity, leadingto the eventual loss of some initial treatment-related benefits. This Phase I study aims to determine feasibility of injecting non-toxic protein crosslinking agents to stiffen the soft palate without producing scar tissue. Previous testing suggests that this technique can augment the soft palate's mechanical properties, reduce vibration, and concomitantly increase resistance to mechanical degradation. The overall aim of this program will be to commercialize a less expensive, faster (same-day benefit), andsuperior injectable treatment for the reduction of snoring, prevention of OSAS, and reduction of airway collapse. Feasibility will be evaluated in four parts: 1) the ability of crosslinking agents to improve the mechanical properties and increase the resistance to mechanical degradation of soft palate tissue will be tested; 2) a wind tunnel test system will be developed to measure the vibration magnitude and oscillation frequency of horse soft palates; 3) the wind tunnel will be used to quantify reduction of vibration in horse soft palates following preferred crosslinker injections; ad 4) safety and treatment effect will be evaluated in pilot studies involving treatment of soft palats in normal horses and horses diagnosed with dorsal displacement of the softpalate (DDSP) which involves a form of awake snoring and apnea. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Snoring is a highly prevalent condition that can lead to sleep-deprivation in the sufferer and to a more serious and sometimes life-threatening condition, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), where breathing is interrupted during sleep by physical obstruction of the airway. Current treatments for snoring and OSAS include surgery, the use of oral appliances, and more recently, minimally invasive procedures directed at stiffening the soft palate, all of which rely on the formation of mechanically inferior scar tissue We propose to investigate a less expensive injectable agent which we believe, based on previous studies, can improve thesoft palate's mechanical properties, reduce vibration, and concomitantly increase resistance to mechanical degradation, for the reduction of snoring, prevention of OSAS, and reduction of airway collapse.


Zhu K.,Orthopeutics, Lp | Hedman T.,Orthopeutics, Lp | Hedman T.,Texas A&M University
Natural Product Communications | Year: 2010

Degradation of genipin (GP), a low toxicity natural protein crosslinking agent, in aqueous solution was monitored by HPLC at various pH levels. Degradation of GP was consistent with a mechanism consisting of a first order reaction with a reversible first step. Formation of the intermediate was slowest at more neutral pHs while formation of the irreversible product was correlated to increasing alkalinity. Degradation at all pHs was enhanced by the presence of phosphate ions. Degradation of GP most likely proceeds via the reversible opening of the dihydropyran ring by water followed by irreversible polymerization of the intermediate. Degraded solutions containing no detectable GP or intermediate, however, are still capable of crosslinking proteins. Source

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