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PLYMOUTH, Minn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Rotation Medical Inc., a medical device company focused on developing new technologies to treat rotator cuff disease, today announced key events for the upcoming Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting May 18-20 in Denver. These events include first-ever presentation of results of the REBUILD study of the company’s Bioinductive Implant for rotator cuff repair, as well as multiple podium presentations. Rotation Medical’s REBUILD (Rotation MEdical BioindUctive ImpLant Database) is a prospective, non-randomized, real-world registry study designed to collect patient-reported outcomes, including shoulder function, pain and quality of life, after receiving the Bioinductive Implant. Dr. Louis McIntyre of Northwell Health Physician Partners Orthopaedic Institute at Sleepy Hollow (New York) will share results of the first 200 patients enrolled in the study, as well as provide case examples and an overview of published clinical data on Thursday, May 18, 11:40 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Attendees will also have the opportunity to learn more about the Rotation Medical Bioinductive Implant at the following events: “Given the high failure rate and difficult recovery required for traditional approaches to rotator cuff repair, we believe the results of our REBUILD real-world study will speak to the potential of our Bioinductive Implant to transform the treatment of rotator cuff disease,” said Martha Shadan, president and CEO of Rotation Medical. “Attendees at this year’s AANA Annual Meeting will also have many opportunities to hear from their peers how our Bioinductive Implant can improve outcomes for people with rotator cuff tears.” Rotator cuff damage is the most common source of shoulder pain, affecting more than 4 million people annually in the U.S. Traditional approaches to treating degenerate or torn rotator cuffs often do not address the poor quality of the underlying tendon tissue, and a significant number of these tendons, after standard treatment, either degenerate further and/or re-tear. Cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in March 2014, the Rotation Medical Bioinductive Implant is designed to address both the biomechanics and biology required to heal a rotator cuff tendon tear by inducing new tissue growth at the site of implantation, resulting in increased tendon thickness and healing of tendon defects with new tissue growth. The collagen-based implant is about the size of a postage stamp and it is part of the Rotation Medical rotator cuff system, which also includes disposable instruments that allow the arthroscopic procedure to be performed easily and quickly. For important safety information, visit http://rotationmedical.com/our-solution/risks/. Rotation Medical Inc. was founded in 2009 and is committed to improving the treatment of rotator cuff disease with the Rotation Medical rotator cuff system, a breakthrough technology that has the potential to prevent rotator cuff disease progression and reduce re-tears by inducing the growth of new tendinous tissue. The company is privately held and funded by New Enterprise Associates (NEA), Life Sciences Partners (LSP) and Pappas Ventures. For more information, visit http://www.rotationmedical.com/.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Allegheny Health Network (AHN) announced today the opening of its new Pediatric Orthopaedic Institute, a multi-disciplinary program for children, adolescents and teenagers who suffer from orthopaedic and neuromuscular conditions, including those who sustain injuries that require same-day care. Located at 12620 Perry Highway in Wexford, the AHN Pediatric Orthopaedic Institute is staffed by board-certified physicians and orthopaedic surgeons, certified physician assistants, prosthetists / orthotists, registered nurses and sports medicine specialists. To celebrate the opening of the Institute, a ribbon-cutting event is scheduled for 5:00 PM. Media tours will also be available throughout the day. “For those who seek orthopaedic care for their child that is comprehensive, compassionate and truly patient-centered, there is no better place in western Pennsylvania than the Pediatric Orthopaedic Institute,” said Patrick J. DeMeo, MD, Chair of the AHN Orthopaedic Institute and Medical Director for the Pittsburgh Pirates. “With a world-class team of pediatric caregivers, we are extremely pleased to be able to provide this new resource to the community and look forward to the great service it will provide for families from across the region for decades to come.” The 15,000-square-foot Institute features various specialty centers of care dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of neuromusculoskeletal injuries and conditions. At the Kids’ Sports and Injury Center, which offers same-day appointments and extended hours, children can receive care for acute injuries, including bone fractures, and other emergent conditions such as a slipped capital femoral epiphysis, or ‘hip slip, and sudden limping. The Spine and Musculoskeletal Center is designed for the treatment of complex neuromuscular conditions such as bone tumors or lesions, cerebral palsy, clubfoot, hip dysplasia, muscular dystrophy, Perthes disease, skeletal dysplasia, and spinal alignment disorders including scoliosis. The Center offers screening clinics for infant hip dysplasia, clubfoot and scoliosis, as well as care for infants in utero and young babies with neuromuscular conditions. Within the Concussion and Sports Medicine Center, board-certified sports medicine physicians provide patients with access to state-of-the-art concussion diagnosis, management, and treatment. The Center is equipped with C3 Logix concussion evaluation and management technology – a groundbreaking system that combines a computerized neurocognitive exam with a novel tablet-based technology to determine the existence and/or severity of a head injury. Specialists at the Institute also provide injury rehabilitation, physical therapy, and occupational therapy, as well as customized therapy for children with special needs, including those with Down syndrome and autism. Directed by pediatric orthopaedic surgeon Mark Sangimino, MD, the Pediatric Orthopaedic Institute places a strong emphasis on educating patients’ families and providing them the support needed to navigate their child’s complete care path. “Whether a child suffers a traumatic injury while playing a sport, or is diagnosed with a complex neuromusculoskeletal condition at birth, it can be a frightening time for the patient and their family,” said Dr. Sangimino. “The Pediatric Orthopaedic Institute represents a unique approach to neuromuscular care in that families have all of the resources they need – in one location – to manage their child’s condition and help expedite their path to recovery and a higher quality of life.” Combining compassionate care with proven technological advancements, the Institute offers highly advanced imaging capabilities, including onsite ultrasound technology and an innovative 3D-imaging technology called EOS. The EOS machine scans a patient in the standing position using the lowest dose of radiation possible, yielding less risk to children. The scan shows the child’s natural, weight-bearing posture which provides insight into the interaction between joints and the rest of the neuromusculoskeletal system, particularly the spine, hips and legs. EOS’ extremely detailed, high-quality images assist doctors in making clinical decisions about treatment. For one young patient who recently underwent EOS imaging and has a spinal curvature, the EOS’s precise images assisted the onsite brace designers in making a more effective brace. “It’s about getting ahead of a patient’s curve such that it does not progress to a point where surgery would be required,” said Dr. Sangimino. “Our focus is always on prevention with aggressive nonsurgical treatment strategies for improved patient outcomes.” Under the leadership of Dr. Sangimino, the staff includes pediatric orthopaedic surgeon Stephanie L. Schneck-Jacob, MD; pediatric orthpaedic non-operative specialist Cathleen S. McGonigle, DO; concussion / sports medicine specialists and Pittsburgh Pirates team physicians Marco Alcala, MD, and Edward Snell, MD. To make an appointment at the Pediatric Orthopaedic Institute, families should call 412-DOCTORS. ### About Allegheny Health Network Allegheny Health Network (AHN.org), part of Highmark Health, is an integrated healthcare delivery system serving the greater Western Pennsylvania region. The Network is composed of eight hospitals, including Allegheny General Hospital, its flagship academic medical center in Pittsburgh, Allegheny Valley Hospital in Natrona Heights, Canonsburg Hospital in Canonsburg, Forbes Hospital in Monroeville, Jefferson Hospital in Jefferson Hills, Saint Vincent Hospital in Erie, West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh and Westfield Memorial Hospital in Westfield, NY. The Network provides patients with access to a complete spectrum of medical services, including nationally recognized programs for primary and emergency care, cardiovascular disease, cancer care, orthopedic surgery, neurology and neurosurgery, women’s health, diabetes and more. It also is home to a comprehensive research institute; Health + Wellness Pavilions; an employed physician organization, home and community based health services and a group purchasing organization. The Network employs approximately 17,500 people, has more than 2,800 physicians on its medical staff and serves as a clinical campus for Drexel University College of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, and the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine.


DENVER--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Rotation Medical Inc., a medical device company focused on developing new technologies to treat rotator cuff disease, today announced initial results for the REBUILD registry of the company’s Bioinductive Implant at the Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) Annual Meeting. The REBUILD registry adds to the growing body of literature supporting the use of the Rotation Medical Bioinductive Implant as a novel treatment for rotator cuff injury. REBUILD (Rotation MEdical BioindUctive ImpLant Database) is a prospective, non-randomized, multicenter registry designed to collect patient reported outcomes, including shoulder function, pain and quality of life after receiving the Bioinductive Implant. Interim results of the first 200 patients showed significantly less post-operative pain and use of narcotics, less sling time, faster return to function and better overall shoulder rating. The study will follow up to 300 patients across 20 study centers. “Patients often opt out or delay surgery in the early stages of rotator cuff disease due to long and painful rehabilitation,” said Dr. Louis McIntyre, study investigator and orthopedic surgeon at Northwell Health Physician Partners Orthopaedic Institute at Sleepy Hollow, New York. “Initial results of the REBUILD registry demonstrate statistically significant improvements in several outcomes measures, including pain, function and overall shoulder rating.” Data in the REBUILD registry are being compared to data in a national orthopaedic database using standard rotator cuff treatment. Patients in the REBUILD registry report feeling better six months after receiving the Bioinductive Implant than those who received standard treatment did at two years. “Payors and providers are increasingly looking for data that demonstrate the effectiveness of medical devices on key health economic drivers,” said Martha Shadan, president and CEO of Rotation Medical. “With the results of the REBUILD registry, we believe our Bioinductive Implant is well-positioned to transform the treatment of rotator cuff disease, enabling patients to get back to work and other activities more quickly with less pain and use of narcotics than traditional rotator cuff repair.” Rotator cuff damage is the most common source of shoulder pain, affecting more than 4 million people annually in the U.S. Traditional approaches to treating degenerate or torn rotator cuffs often do not address the poor quality of the underlying tendon tissue, and a significant number of these tendons, after standard treatment, either degenerate further and/or re-tear. Cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in March 2014, the Rotation Medical Bioinductive Implant is designed to address both the biomechanics and biology required to heal a rotator cuff tendon tear by inducing new tissue growth at the site of implantation, resulting in increased tendon thickness and healing of tendon defects with new tissue growth. The collagen-based implant is about the size of a postage stamp and it is part of the Rotation Medical rotator cuff system, which also includes disposable instruments that allow the arthroscopic procedure to be performed easily and quickly. For important safety information, visit http://rotationmedical.com/our-solution/risks/. Rotation Medical Inc. was founded in 2009 and is committed to improving the treatment of rotator cuff disease with the Rotation Medical rotator cuff system, a breakthrough technology that has the potential to prevent rotator cuff disease progression and reduce re-tears by inducing the growth of new tendinous tissue. The company is privately held and funded by New Enterprise Associates (NEA), Life Sciences Partners (LSP) and Pappas Ventures. For more information, visit http://www.rotationmedical.com/.


News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Kansas City Orthopaedic Institute surgeon Dr. Kirk McCullough and Dr. Dan Lorenz of Specialists in Sports & Orthopedic Rehabiliation (SSOR) are partnering up to present several talks at the Annual Big 12 Sports Medicine meeting to be held in Dallas, TX May 5th, 2017. Lorenz and McCullough will make quite the tandem, focusing on diagnosis and management of foot and ankle injuries in the athlete. Dr. McCullough is dual-fellowship trained in both Orthopaedic Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle, and Dr. Lorenz is Kansas City’s only Fellowship-trained Physical Therapist in Sports Physical Therapy. Dr. McCullough, a member of the NFL Foot and Ankle Subcommittee and Assistant Team Physician for the Kansas City Chiefs and Sporting KC, will discuss diagnosis and surgical management of athletic foot and ankle injuries. His talk will focus on current trends in treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, High Ankle Sprains and other common conditions in athletes. Dr. Lorenz, a nationally-recognized speaker in Sports Physical Therapy, will be giving two presentations at the meeting. The first will be on evidence-based screening and testing measures for lower extremity pathologies with particular emphasis on the foot and ankle. Following that, Dr. Lorenz will speak on performance enhancement following foot and ankle procedures in the athlete to maximize outcomes and return to play. To learn more about Dr. McCullough, visit http://www.orthosportskansascity.com/kirk-a-mccullough-m-d/. To learn more about Dr. Lorenz and SSOR, visit http://www.ssorkc.com. SSOR has locations in Overland Park and Prairie Village, KS to serve the needs of the community. Their central focus of treatment is manual therapy and exercise with a healthy mix of education and a positive environment to help their patients get results quickly.


News Article | April 28, 2016
Site: www.technologyreview.com

Customized, printed orthopedic implants could be the future. In the meantime, the new manufacturing method is helping companies cut costs. Orthopedic surgeons are relying more and more on 3-D printing to build replacements for their patients’ defective or worn out bones. This year surgeons around the world will implant tens of thousands of 3-D printed replacements parts for hips, knees, ankles, parts of the spine, and even sections of the skull. Most of them look a lot like their conventionally made titanium counterparts. But the first few 3-D printed implants tailored specifically to an individual’s anatomy may hint at a future in which customized bone replacements are commonplace. Printed parts represent only a small fraction of the overall market for orthopedic implants, but for two important reasons that share could grow quickly in the coming years. First, an aging population is getting more joint replacement operations. The number of annual hip replacements in the U.S. doubled between 2000 and 2010. Second, in recent years engineers have gotten much better at using additive manufacturing technology—as 3-D printing is also called—to make titanium implants. Leading orthopedic implant makers are investing substantially in the development of the technology; earlier this year Stryker announced plans to build a $400 million additive manufacturing facility. Companies hope to cut costs by simplifying the production process for these implants, which are often geometrically complicated assemblies of multiple metal pieces. Building them layer by layer allows companies to consolidate many pieces into one, and save material that would be wasted in traditional subtractive manufacturing processes like forging and casting (see “10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013: Additive Manufacturing”). But perhaps the biggest potential benefit is the ability to design implants that are specific to an individual patient’s body, by using data from magnetic resonance imaging or computerized tomography scans. That’s especially true for parts of the skeleton that have complicated geometries that can be very unique to an individual, like the pelvis, says Jason Koh, an orthopedic surgeon at NorthShore University Health System and director of the NorthShore Orthopaedic Institute. Koh says customized total joint replacements could also have substantial benefits for patients. In the U.S., a few printed, custom implants have already received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration, including a total knee replacement and a craniofacial plate. It’s still very early days for custom implants. Less than 1 percent of the implants made on the electron beam melting machines sold by market-leader Arcam are patient-specific, says the company’s CEO Magnus René. René estimates that at least half of today’s additively manufactured orthopedic implants are made using Arcam’s machines. But more custom implants are under development. One hurdle might be uncertainty over how the FDA will ultimately choose to approach this new class of implants, according to Greg Kowalczyk, president of a startup called Additive Orthopaedics, which is developing a custom product. So far the agency has cleared new printed implants that it determined pose no more risk than a product already on the market, but those devices have mostly been made out of materials and based on designs familiar to the FDA. The medical value of custom implants could be “tremendous,” says Koh. But he says the technology will likely face design hurdles as well, especially in cases where the implants need to bear substantial bodyweight, such as in a hip replacement. A challenge will be identifying the specific areas in which additive manufacturing is uniquely valuable to the overall health-care system, says Koh.


News Article | April 27, 2016
Site: www.technologyreview.com

Customized, printed orthopedic implants could be the future. In the meantime, the new manufacturing method is helping companies cut costs. Orthopedic surgeons are relying more and more on 3-D printing to build replacements for their patients’ defective or worn out bones. This year surgeons around the world will implant tens of thousands of 3-D printed replacements parts for hips, knees, ankles, parts of the spine, and even sections of the skull. Most of them look a lot like their conventionally made titanium counterparts. But the first few 3-D printed implants tailored specifically to an individual’s anatomy may hint at a future in which customized bone replacements are commonplace. Printed parts represent only a small fraction of the overall market for orthopedic implants, but for two important reasons that share could grow quickly in the coming years. First, an aging population is getting more joint replacement operations. The number of annual hip replacements in the U.S. doubled between 2000 and 2010. Second, in recent years engineers have gotten much better at using additive manufacturing technology—as 3-D printing is also called—to make titanium implants. Leading orthopedic implant makers are investing substantially in the development of the technology; earlier this year Stryker announced plans to build a $400 million additive manufacturing facility. Companies hope to cut costs by simplifying the production process for these implants, which are often geometrically complicated assemblies of multiple metal pieces. Building them layer by layer allows companies to consolidate many pieces into one, and save material that would be wasted in traditional subtractive manufacturing processes like forging and casting (see “10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013: Additive Manufacturing”). But perhaps the biggest potential benefit is the ability to design implants that are specific to an individual patient’s body, by using data from magnetic resonance imaging or computerized tomography scans. That’s especially true for parts of the skeleton that have complicated geometries that can be very unique to an individual, like the pelvis, says Jason Koh, an orthopedic surgeon at NorthShore University Health System and director of the NorthShore Orthopaedic Institute. Koh says customized total joint replacements could also have substantial benefits for patients. In the U.S., a few printed, custom implants have already received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration, including a total knee replacement and a craniofacial plate. It’s still very early days for custom implants. Less than 1 percent of the implants made on the electron beam melting machines sold by market-leader Arcam are patient-specific, says the company’s CEO Magnus René. René estimates that at least half of today’s additively manufactured orthopedic implants are made using Arcam’s machines. But more custom implants are under development. One hurdle might be uncertainty over how the FDA will ultimately choose to approach this new class of implants, according to Greg Kowalczyk, president of a startup called Additive Orthopaedics, which is developing a custom product. So far the agency has cleared new printed implants that it determined pose no more risk than a product already on the market, but those devices have mostly been made out of materials and based on designs familiar to the FDA. The medical value of custom implants could be “tremendous,” says Koh. But he says the technology will likely face design hurdles as well, especially in cases where the implants need to bear substantial bodyweight, such as in a hip replacement. A challenge will be identifying the specific areas in which additive manufacturing is uniquely valuable to the overall health-care system, says Koh.


Khazzam M.,Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas | Kuhn J.E.,Vanderbilt University | Mulligan E.,Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas | Abboud J.A.,Thomas Jefferson University | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Sports Medicine | Year: 2012

Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used imaging modality to assess the rotator cuff. Currently, there are a limited number of studies assessing the interobserver and intraobserver reliability of MRI after rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis: Fellowship-trained orthopaedic shoulder surgeons will have good inter- and intraobserver agreement with regard to features of the repaired rotator cuff (repair integrity, fat content, muscle volume, number of tendons involved, tear size, and retract) on MRI. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Seven fellowship-trained orthopaedic shoulder surgeons reviewed 31 MRI scans from 31 shoulders from patients who had previous rotator cuff repair. The scans were evaluated for the following characteristics: rotator cuff repair status (fullthickness retear vs intact repair), tear location, tendon thickness, fatty infiltration, atrophy, number of tendons involved in retear, tendon retraction, status of the long head of the biceps tendon, and bone marrow edema in the humeral head. Surgeons were asked to review images at 2 separate time points approximately 9 months apart and complete an evaluation form for each scan at each time point. Multirater kappa (k) statistics were used to assess inter- and intraobserver reliability. Results: The interobserver agreement was highest (80%, k = 0.60) for identifying full-thickness retears, tendon retear retraction (64%, k = 0.45), and cysts in the greater tuberosity (72%, k = 0.43). All other variables were found to have fair to poor agreement. The worst interobserver agreement was associated with identifying rotator cuff footprint coverage (47%, k = 0.21) and tendon signal intensity (29%, k = 0.01). The mean intraobserver reproducibility was also highest (77%-90%, k = 0.71) for full-thickness retears, quality of the supraspinatus (47%-83%, k = 0.52), tears of the long head of the biceps tendon (58%-94%, k = 0.49), presence of bone marrow edema in the humeral head (63%-87%, k = 0.48), cysts in the greater tuberosity (70%-83%, k = 0.47), signal in the long head of the biceps tendon (60%-80%, k = 0.43), and quality of the infraspinatus (37-90%, k = 0.43). The worst intraobserver reproducibility was found in identification of the location of bone marrow edema (22%-83%, k = 0.03). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that there is substantial variability when evaluating MRI scans after rotator cuff repair. Intact rotator cuff repairs or full-thickness retears can be identified with moderate reliability. These findings indicate that additional imaging modalities may be needed for accurate assessment of the repaired rotator cuff. © 2012 The Author(s).


Matava M.J.,University of Washington | Arciero R.A.,University of Connecticut Health Center | Baumgarten K.M.,Orthopaedic Institute | Carey J.L.,Vanderbilt University | And 8 more authors.
American Journal of Sports Medicine | Year: 2015

Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure occurs in up to 10% of cases. Technical errors are considered the most common cause of graft failure despite the absence of validated studies. Limited data are available regarding the agreement among orthopaedic surgeons regarding the causes of primary ACL reconstruction failure and accuracy of graft tunnel placement. Hypothesis: Experienced knee surgeons have a high level of interobserver reliability in the agreement about the causes of primary ACL reconstruction failure, anatomic graft characteristics, and tunnel placement. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty cases of revision ACL reconstruction were randomly selected from the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) database. Each case included the patient's history, standardized radiographs, and a concise 30-second arthroscopic video taken at the time of revision demonstrating the graft remnant and location of the tunnel apertures. All 20 cases were reviewed by 10 MARS surgeons not involved with the primary surgery. Each surgeon completed a 2-part questionnaire dealing with each surgeon's training and practice, as well as the placement of the femoral and tibial tunnels, condition of the primary graft, and the surgeon's opinion as to the causes of graft failure. Interrater agreement was determined for each question with the kappa coefficient and the prevalence-adjusted, bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK). Results: The 10 reviewers have been in practice an average of 14 years and have performed at least 25 ACL reconstructions per year, and 9 were fellowship trained in sports medicine. There was wide variability in agreement among knee experts as to the specific causes of ACL graft failure. When participants were specifically asked about technical error as the cause for failure, interobserver agreement was only slight (PABAK = 0.26). There was fair overall agreement on ideal femoral tunnel placement (PABAK = 0.55) but only slight agreement on whether a femoral tunnel was too anterior (PABAK = 0.24) and fair agreement on whether it was too vertical (PABAK = 0.46). There was poor overall agreement for ideal tibial tunnel placement (PABAK = 0.17). Conclusion: This study suggests that more objective criteria are needed to accurately determine the causes of primary ACL graft failure as well as the ideal femoral and tibial tunnel placement in patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction. © 2014 The Author(s).


Riskind P.,Press Ganey Associates | Fossey L.,Azalea Orthopedics | Brill K.,Orthopaedic Institute
Journal of Medical Practice Management | Year: 2011

Apractice that consistently and continuously measures patient perceptions will be more efficient and effective in its daily operations. With pay-for-performance requirements on the horizon and consumer rating sites already publicizing impressions from physician encounters, a practice needs to know how it is performing through the eyes of the patients. Azalea Ortho pedics has used patient feedback to coach its physicians on better patient communication. The Orthopaedic Institute has used patient satisfaction results to reduce wait times and measure the return on investment from its marketing efforts. Patient survey results that are put to work can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of practice operations as well as position the practice for increased profitability. Copyright © 2011 by Greenbranch Publishing LLC.


Yan D.,Baoan Peoples Hospital | Wang Z.,Fifth Hospital of Zunyi | Deng S.,Baoan Peoples Hospital | Li J.,Guangzhou Medical College | Soo C.,Orthopaedic Institute
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery | Year: 2011

Objective This retrospective study was to evaluate the relationship between osteoporosis and dynamic cervical plates in screw-plate or screw-bone interface of elderly cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients. Methods Retrospective study was conducted on elderly CSM patients, treated by anterior corpectomy and reconstruction with titanium mesh cages (TMC) and dynamic cervical plate between July 2004 and June 2007. All patients underwent bone mineral density (BMD) assessment in preoperation, and according to the osteoporosis degree they have been divided into two groups: moderate osteoporosis degree group and severe osteoporosis degree group. The clinical outcome [Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)], bone fusion assessment (CT mielogram), the change of titanium mesh cages and plate of cephalic screw-plate-angle (SPA) and cephalic endplate-plate-angle (EPA) of plain X-ray Wlms were measured. Results The mean JOA score and recovery rate were not different between the two groups (P > 0.05). There was no loss of sagittal alignment after surgery in any patient, and no significant difference between both groups on lordosis measurements (P > 0.05). Although there was a significant difference of the cage subsidence rate between the two groups (P < 0.001), all patients had favorable bone union and none required additional treatment. The average changes of SPA were greater in A group patients than in B group patients, while the variation of EPA was higher in B group patients than in A group patients (P < 0.001). Conclusions Despite the fact that there is a significant difference of the cage subsidence rate between the two groups no clinical outcome, nor sagittal alignment or fusion rate differences among groups was observed in elderly CSM patients. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

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