Bangor, ME, United States

Time filter

Source Type

A system and method for capturing a target analyte in advance of performing spectroscopic analysis to determine the existence of the target analyte from a source contacted with a collection substrate. The collection substrate is fabricated of a material selected to have an affinity for the target analyte, sufficiently transparent in a spectral region of interest and capable of immobilizing the target analyte thereon in a manner that limits scattering sufficient to obscure spectral analysis. The collection substrate may be coated with a material selected to react with, bind to, or absorb the target analyte. The method optionally includes the step of transferring the captured target analyte to a second substrate, which may be an optical substrate. The target analyte may be captured to the collection substrate by one or more of wiping, dabbing or swabbing a target analyte carrier with the collection substrate.


Grant
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2012

Organophosphates cannot currently be analyzed in the field using existing technologies, due to insufficient sensitivity of currently fielded instruments. This inability reduces the number of analyses that a government agency can perform on a water supply to ensure its safety to humans and the environment. The objective of this Phase I effort is to design a novel strategy that preconcentrates organophosphates into a film using reactive materials, which can then be analyzed using Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) Infrared (IR spectroscopy. Portable and handheld ATR-IR detection systems are currently used in the field by hazmat teams, first responders and military units for analyzing bulk material quantities. However, these instruments cannot be used to detect relevant concentrations of organophosphates in solution because ATR IR spectroscopy does not have sufficient sensitivity to measure trace chemicals without a preconcentration step. This Phase I proposes to address this bundle by developing a novel preconcentration technology that will enable currently fielded ATR IR spectrometers to make trace measurement in water. Preliminary experiments using simple organophosphates and sulfhydry1 hydrolysis product stimulants demonstrated the principle that these chemical can be concentrated into a film using reactive materials and analyzed directly using IR spectroscopy. The Phase I effort will build upon this concept and focus on IR amenable reactive material development that can be used to preconcentrate trace amounts of organophosphates from an aqueous medium and be analyzed using currently fielded ATR IR instruments. In particular, the proposed preconcentration technology will enable ppm-ppb detection levels for a broad range of chemical including pesticides, toxic Industrial chemicals, and chemical warfare agents. A material and technology downselect will occur near the end of Phase I, and the best performing materials and detection strategies will be the basis for an initial prototype design which will undergo extensive testing (e.g., identification of a wide range of organophosphates, determining figures of merit, potential live agent testing, matrix interference testing) in Phase II. If successful, it is anticipated that market penetration and adoption of this technology will be high since the technology is being developed as an enabling sampling method to be used with validated instruments. Furthermore, OSS has established strategic working relationships with the companies that build portable IR spectrometers for hazmat teams, first responders and the military. Therefore, OSS will be well positioned to leverage these industry relationships to establish licensing and/or joint product development agreement during Phase II/Phase III commercialization efforts.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Office for Chemical and Biological Defense | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.09M | Year: 2012

The objective of this Phase II project is to design, build, and test a prototype self reporting detection system that utilizes a ruggedized version of M8 chemical agent detection paper for detecting and reporting potential liquid chemical warfare attacks at fixed military sites and installations. During Phase I of this project, a robust, superhydrophobic and oleophilic coating was successfully developed, applied and tested on M8 paper. These tests demonstrated that this ruggedized and improved version of M8 detection strips was able to aggressively repel water and dirt, while still allowing chemical warfare agents to rapidly penetrate the coating and produce the expected color changes on the underlying paper. The proposed detection system for Phase II work will exploit these new capabilities, and will primarily involve the construction and testing of an automated detection system network containing transduction hardware and software capable of reading and self reporting color changes on the coated M8 test strips due to CWA interactions. The self reporting detection system network will be able to continuously monitor military facilities for CWA attacks and report positive alarms to military personnel in real time, thereby facilitating interoperability with integrated base defense and mobile force protection needs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: The goal of this Phase I STTR project is to investigate the application of a new class of metallic nanoparticles exhibiting a star-shaped geometry (nanostars) for use as in vivo probes of chemical and biological warfare agents. In contrast to their more commonplace spherical cousins, particles with this novel geometry have recently gained interest due to their ability to focus and enhance electric fields around the star surface features. Field enhancement has been estimated to be as large as 10,000 times greater than that observed for spherical gold particles. In fact, single nanostar Raman signals can exceed those obtained from the brightest molecular fluors, even when imaged using common fluorescence instrumentation. Phase I work will take advantage of our previous experiences in fabricating these star-shaped nanoparticles by modifying their surfaces with specific chemistries that are tuned for agent concentration and binding at these enhanced electric field sites on the nanostars. In addition, control over the nanostar morphology will also be investigated for optimizing agent detection via spectroscopic detection systems. The outcome of these efforts will be to identify the optimum materials for development of a broad-based biosensor platform during Phase II. BENEFIT: The anticipated benefits of the research and development efforts outlined in this proposal will be the design, fabrication and testing of gold nanostar probes for intracellular chem/bio detection that presents significant advantages over existing methods by providing a biomolecular switch for detecting target agents in biological samples for real-time detection capabilities in complex environments.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2010

The goal of this Phase I proposal is to develop a synthetic, low cost, and benign simulant for biowarfare agents (BWA) to be used in the testing of standoff sensors. Orono Spectral Solutions Inc. (OSS) has performed preliminary work leading to the identification of benign ingredients that, when combined in a predefined mass ratio, mimic UV-Vis and infrared signatures of BG spores. This work was performed under an existing contract (DoD contract # W911SR-06-C-0035). The objective of future investigation is to expand upon this work to 1) complete the development of a material package for a BG spore simulant, 2) develop similar material packages that mimic the same signatures of Erwinia herbicola and MS2 bateriophage and 3) develop a method for creating micron sized particles using the ingredients identified for our existing BG simulant.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2010

The overall goal of this Phase I project is to demonstrate the feasibility of an infrared transparent, micro-fluidic sampling system that will lead to a field-deployable detection system capable of detecting low ppb levels of chemical warfare (CW) agents in water. To accomplish this goal, the proposed detection system will combine high surface area, organically modified mesoporous oxide absorptive materials that are coated within a micro-fluidic sampling system for CW agent collection and concentration. Detection and identification of the concentrated CW agent will be accomplished by direct analysis of the micro-fluidic device via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The main advantages of this approach are that it can operate in heterogeneous aqueous environments and will provide fast detection (< 10 min) and high sensitivity/selectivity to nonvolatile CW agents with minimal false alarms.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Office for Chemical and Biological Defense | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2011

The goal of this Phase I project is to develop coatings for M8 paper that improve its robustness and rate of detection of potential liquid/aerosol chemical warfare attack at fixed military sites and installations. A problem that is currently experienced with M8 paper is that it is easily contaminated by dust or destroyed by rain and thus requires frequent replacement in outdoor environments. Our initial studies have shown that, while commercially available M8 paper does posses minimal water repellant characteristics, droplets of water stick to the paper"s surface and penetrate into the paper over time, ultimately degrading its performance for CW detection. OSS will develop coatings that eliminate this issue by allowing water droplets to roll off the surface. Specifically, we will modify COTS M8 paper with ultrathin superhydrophobic and oleophilic material coatings that provide a self-cleaning and waterproof surface while retaining the M8 paper"s ability to detect CW agents. The results of phase I work will lead to a technology downselect for the best coating package for scale-up activities. Phase II work will focus on integrating the optimized M8 paper with a self-reporting system to reduce and/or eliminate visual inspection of the M8 detection strips.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2011

The overall goal of this Phase II project is to develop a prototype micro-fluidic sampling system that will lead to a field-deployable detection system capable of detecting low ppb levels of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and explosive precursors in water. The proposed work will capitalize on Phase I successes in which the feasibility of using an infrared-based micro-fluidic sampling system was demonstrated against a CWA simulant. Micro-fluidic devices were fabricated from IR-grade silicon wafers and coated with absorptive silica sol-gel films for agent retention, and the concentrated agent was detected and analyzed via transmission FTIR spectroscopy directly through the micro-fluidic device. The novelty of this approach for CWA detection is that, unlike traditional solid phase extraction (SPE) techniques which require an elution step to analyze the collected agent, the proposed micro-fluidic sampling system incorporates SPE concentration capabilities onto a platform that is suitable for direct analysis and easy integration with an infrared-based detection system. The outcome of this two year effort will lead to the development of multiple microfluidic arrays packaged onto a single chip for multi-agent collection and detection.


Patent
Orono Spectral solutions, Inc. | Date: 2010-07-08

An apparatus and method to determine analytes in a fluid. One aspect of the present invention is for the determination of the oil content of water using UV, near-IR, IR or Raman spectroscopy or radiometry. In certain embodiments, a solid membrane material absorbs analytes from fluid brought into contact with it. The membrane is subsequently placed in a FTIR spectrometer, which spectrometer is enabled to determine the concentration of analytes in fluid by calibration. Certain embodiments can determine the type of hydrocarbon present, and thus can differentiate Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) from Total Oil and Grease (TOG), without any separate sample preparation.


A system and method for capturing a target analyte in advance of performing spectroscopic analysis to determine the existence of the target analyte from a source contacted with a collection substrate. The collection substrate is fabricated of a material selected to have an affinity for the target analyte, sufficiently transparent in a spectral region of interest and capable of immobilizing the target analyte thereon in a manner that limits scattering sufficient to obscure spectral analysis. The collection substrate may be coated with a material selected to react with, bind to, or absorb the target analyte. The method optionally includes the step of transferring the captured target analyte to a second substrate, which may be an optical substrate. The target analyte may be captured to the collection substrate by one or more of wiping, dabbing or swabbing a target analyte carrier with the collection substrate.

Loading Orono Spectral solutions, Inc. collaborators
Loading Orono Spectral solutions, Inc. collaborators