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Zhou H.-H.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Xu Q.-H.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Huang G.-L.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Li T.-T.,Nanjing Origin Biosciences Inc. | Yan S.,Shanghai JiaoTong University
Chinese Journal of Interventional Imaging and Therapy | Year: 2012

Objective: To assess the inhibitory effect of breast cancer for targeting vascular endothelial growth factor-C_ short hairpin RNA (VEGF-C_shRNA) microbubble ultrasound with irradiation. Methods: Thirty-two female BALB/c nude mice inoculated MCF-7 human breast tumor tissue were randomly divided into 4 groups: Control group (G1 group), targeting VEGF-C_shRNA microbubble with irradiation (G2 group), blank microbubble with irradiation (G3 group) and VEGF-C_shRNA intravenous therapy (G4 group). VEGF-C_shRNA of 150 μg/kg was injected twice for targeted microbubble ultrasound treatment, with irradiation targeted for microbubble many times, then the growth of breast cancer was observed. Results: The tumor growth degree of breast tumors of G2 group was significantly less than other groups, especially on the 3rd, 7th and 17th day, the mean proliferation rate was significantly different from that in G1 group (all P<0.05). Compared with G3 group, the mean proliferation rate of G2 group was significantly different on the 3rd, 7th, 10th, 13th, 17th and 20th day (all P<0.05). Compared with G4 group, the mean proliferation rate of G2 group was obviously different on the 7th, 13th and 17th day (all P<0.05). Conclusion: VEGF-C_shRNA microbubble ultrasound with irradiation can inhibit the growth of breast cancer in nude mice. © 2012 by the Press of Chinese Journal of Medical Imaging Technology.


Wang Z.,Nanjing University | Tong M.,Nanjing Medical University | Chen X.,Nanjing University | Hu S.,Nanjing University | And 6 more authors.
Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine | Year: 2016

We investigated the potential of targeting survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, in visualize pancreatic tumor in mouse model using targeted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Chitosan-coated MNPS and survivin antisense oligonucleotide(ASON) were conjugated to give Sur-MNPs. Accumulations of targeted, non-targeted nanoparticles or nonsense oligonucleotide-MNPs (NSON-MNPs) in the liver, spleen, kidney and tumors were determined. Targeted nanoparticles were highly accumulated in BxPC-3 cells but not in non-cancer cells. In vivo MRI showed a significant T2 signal reduction in tumors of mice injected with targeted nanoparticles but slight signal change in tumors of mice injected with non-targeted nanoparticles or NSON-MNPs. Prussian blue staining demonstrated highly accumulated Sur-MNPs in tumor mass compared with normal pancreatic, kidney and liver tissues. Our data show that the MNPs functionalized with ASON lead to the targeted localization in pancreatic tumors. Survivin targeted nanoparticles could be used for detection of pancreatic tumors. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing Southeast University, University of Houston, Nanjing University and Nanjing Origin Biosciences Inc.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nanomedicine : nanotechnology, biology, and medicine | Year: 2016

We investigated the potential of targeting survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, in visualize pancreatic tumor in mouse model using targeted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Chitosan-coated MNPS and survivin antisense oligonucleotide(ASON) were conjugated to give Sur-MNPs. Accumulations of targeted, non-targeted nanoparticles or nonsense oligonucleotide-MNPs (NSON-MNPs) in the liver, spleen, kidney and tumors were determined. Targeted nanoparticles were highly accumulated in BxPC-3 cells but not in non-cancer cells. In vivo MRI showed a significant T2 signal reduction in tumors of mice injected with targeted nanoparticles but slight signal change in tumors of mice injected with non-targeted nanoparticles or NSON-MNPs. Prussian blue staining demonstrated highly accumulated Sur-MNPs in tumor mass compared with normal pancreatic, kidney and liver tissues. Our data show that the MNPs functionalized with ASON lead to the targeted localization in pancreatic tumors. Survivin targeted nanoparticles could be used for detection of pancreatic tumors.


Wang S.-M.,Nanjing University | Jin H.-Y.,Nanjing University | Zhang C.-X.,Nanjing University | Sun Y.,Nanjing Origin Biosciences Inc. | And 2 more authors.
World Chinese Journal of Digestology | Year: 2010

AIM: To investigate the anticancer effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in an orthotopic transplantation mouse model of colorectal cancer derived from cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). METHODS: The human colon cancer cell line HT-29 expressing eGFP was used to establish a subcutaneous tumor model of colorectal cancer in nude mice. Four weeks later, the subcutaneous tumors were subjected to orthotopic transplantation to establish an orthotopic transplantation mouse model of colorectal cancer. A total of 39 model mice were obtained and divided into four groups: a control group receiving saline and three treatment groups receiving different doses of EGCG (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, respectively) for 14 d. Tumor metastasis was then observed and tumor volume was calculated using a fluorescence imaging system. RESULTS: At 7, 14, 26 and 35 d after treatment with different doses of EGCG, tumor growth velocity was significantly lower in all the treatment groups than in the control group. Tumor volume was significantly smaller in the EGCG (20 mg/kg) treatment group than in the control group (106.7 mm3 ± 155.5 mm3 vs 393.3 mm3 ± 361.1 mm3, P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in tumor volume among the three treatment groups. CONCLUSION: EGCG can significantly inhibit tumor growth in an orthotopic transplantation mouse model of colorectal cancer in a time-dependent manner.


Yang B.-L.,Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Chen H.-J.,Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Chen Y.-G.,Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Gu Y.-F.,Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Colorectal Disease | Year: 2013

Objective: The aim of this article is to study the inhibitory effects of baicalin on the growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenografts consisting of human HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells that are deficient in the mismatch repair gene hMLH1 in nude mice. Methods: A fluorescent orthotopic transplantation model of HCT-116 cells was established. The treatment groups were administered baicalin 50 mg/kg (G2), 100 mg/kg (G3), and 200 mg/kg (G4), and the negative control group (G1) was administered 5 % NaHCO3. The volume and vascular density of the primary tumors, body weights, survival conditions, and death rates of the mice were analyzed. Results: On the 14th, 21st, and 28th days, tumor volume in the treatment groups was significantly smaller than that in the control group, and the differences were statistically significant. At the end of the experiment, the survival rate of the experimental animals in the G3 was significantly higher than that in the G1 and G4 (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in both the weights and surface vascular densities of the primary tumor and the metastatic tumor among all groups. Conclusion: Baicalin had a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of nude mouse orthotopic xenografts consisting of human HCT-116 colorectal tumor cells that are deficient in the mismatch repair gene hMLH1. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

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