Oriflame Skin Research Institute

Stockholm, Sweden

Oriflame Skin Research Institute

Stockholm, Sweden
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Gillbro J.M.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | Merinville E.,Oriflame RandD Ltd | Olsson M.,ParkCell AB | Al-Bader T.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Cosmetic Science | Year: 2015

Objective The need for effective 'anti-ageing' treatments, in particular for the management of photodamaged skin, prompted us to develop a novel method to identify new active ingredients. The model utilized a gene profiling study with corresponding connectivity mapping (Cmap) to identify novel anti-ageing compounds using all-trans retinoic acid (RA) as the lead compound due to its beneficial effect on photodamaged skin and skin firmness. Method A vehicle-controlled clinical study including nine healthy Caucasian female volunteers aged 57 ± 7 (mean ± SEM) exhibiting photodamage on their lower outer forearms was conducted. The volunteers applied RA once daily on photodamaged skin for 7 days, and biopsies were subjected to Affymetrix gene arrays. Connectivity mapping (Cmap), examining hundreds of gene expression profiles, was run on the gene signature of RA-treated photodamaged skin to identify small bioactive compounds. Results Affymetrix gene array identified 19 genes significantly differentially expressed after application of RA. Corresponding Cmap analysis revealed six natural bioactive compounds including N-acetyl aspartic acid (A-A-A) showing similar activity to RA on the differentially expressed genes identified. Conclusion Based on RA mimicking gene array activity, potential use within skincare on molecular size, safety assessment and sourcing, we identified the natural amino acid, A-A-A as a potential candidate to treat ageing skin. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.


Gillbro J.M.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | Al-Bader T.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | Westman M.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | Olsson M.J.,ParkCell AB | Mavon A.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute
International Journal of Cosmetic Science | Year: 2014

Synopsis Objective Retinoids are used as therapeutic agents for numerous skin diseases, for example, psoriasis, acne and keratinization disorders. The same substances have also been recognized in the treatment for hyperpigmentation disorders such as melasma. Other studies on photo-damaged skin have shown that retinoids reduce wrinkles, surface roughness, mottled pigmentation, and visual skin appearance as a whole. We tested the hypothesis that an organoculture of full-thickness human skin could be used as a preclinical model to investigate the retinoid transcriptional profile in human skin in vitro. Methods Full-thickness skin explants were exposed to topically applied all-trans retinoic acid (RA) for 24 h. The gene expression profile was analysed using oligonucleotide microarrays, and data were validated with real-time (RT) PCR. Results We showed that the expression of 93 genes was significantly altered more than twofold. Several of the altered genes, for example, KRT4, CYP26 and LCN2, have previously been shown to be affected by RA in keratinocyte monocultures, reconstructed epidermis and skin biopsies from patients treated topically or orally with RA. In addition, genes, such as SCEL, NRIP1, DGAT2, RDH12 EfnB2, MAPK14, SAMD9 and CEACAM6 not previously reported to be affected by RA in human skin, were identified for the first time in this study. Conclusion The results in the present study show that full-thickness human explants represent a valuable pre-clinical model for studying the effects of retinoids in skin. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.


PubMed | Oriflame R&D Ltd, Oriflame Skin Research Institute and ParkCell AB
Type: | Journal: International journal of cosmetic science | Year: 2015

The need for effective anti-ageing treatments, in particular for the management of photodamaged skin, prompted us to develop a novel method to identify new active ingredients. The model utilized a gene profiling study with corresponding connectivity mapping (Cmap) to identify novel anti-ageing compounds using all-trans retinoic acid (RA) as the lead compound due to its beneficial effect on photodamaged skin and skin firmness.A vehicle-controlled clinical study including nine healthy Caucasian female volunteers aged 57 7 (mean SEM) exhibiting photodamage on their lower outer forearms was conducted. The volunteers applied RA once daily on photodamaged skin for 7 days, and biopsies were subjected to Affymetrix gene arrays. Connectivity mapping (Cmap), examining hundreds of gene expression profiles, was run on the gene signature of RA-treated photodamaged skin to identify small bioactive compounds.Affymetrix gene array identified 19 genes significantly differentially expressed after application of RA. Corresponding Cmap analysis revealed six natural bioactive compounds including N-acetyl aspartic acid (A-A-A) showing similar activity to RA on the differentially expressed genes identified.Based on RA mimicking gene array activity, potential use within skincare on molecular size, safety assessment and sourcing, we identified the natural amino acid, A-A-A as a potential candidate to treat ageing skin.


Gillbro J.M.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | Lundahl M.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | Westman M.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | Baral R.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Cosmetic Science | Year: 2015

Background Acetyl aspartic acid (A-A-A) was discovered through gene array analysis with corresponding connectivity mapping (Cmap), aiming for identification of new compounds with anti-ageing properties. Objective The aim of this study was to use structural activity relationship (SAR) analysis to identify a predictive mechanism of action of A-A-A. The findings from SAR will be further characterized by in vitro activity testing. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate the role of polymerized filamentous F-actin in ageing fibroblasts and to evaluate the effect of A-A-A on this model. Methods To predict the mode of action of A-A-A, we used the PASS computer program as a SAR model. In vitro, scratch motility tests with immortalized keratinocytes were used as a model for wound healing potential. Matrix metalloproteinase 1-3 (MMP 1-3) was analysed using multiplex protein assays (Luminex), and polymerized actin was detected by phalloidin staining in dermal fibroblasts (HDF). Results SAR analysis predicted that A-A-A would possess both epidermal and dermal activities with identification of wound healing and MMP inhibition potential. Further in vitro studies confirmed the wound healing potential using keratinocyte scratch motility assays. We were also able to confirm the dermal activities predicted by inhibition of MMP (MMP 1-3) in HDF by A-A-A. In addition, we found a positive relationship between age and F-actin expression. We also discovered that stimulation of HDF with A-A-A for 72 h significantly reduced the polymerized cytoskeletal network as visualized by inhibition of F-actin expression. In fact, A-A-A leveraged the expression of F-actin in middle-aged female fibroblasts (50 years of age) to the level of young female fibroblasts (30 years of age), corresponding to a 40% reduction in F-actin expression. Conclusion Using an in silico and in vitro approach, we were able to demonstrate that A-A-A has the capacity to target different compartments of the skin through keratinocyte regeneration, MMP inhibition and relief in fibroblasts stiffness by reduction of F-actin cytoskeletal network in HDF. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.


Gillbro J.M.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | Merinville E.,Oriflame RandD Ltd | Cattley K.,Oriflame RandD Ltd | Al-Bader T.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Cosmetic Science | Year: 2015

Objective Acetyl aspartic acid (A-A-A) was discovered through gene array analysis with corresponding Cmap analysis. We found that A-A-A increased keratinocyte regeneration, inhibited dermal matrix metalloprotease (MMP) expression and relieved fibroblast stiffness through reduction of the fibroblast stiffness marker F-actin. Dermal absorption studies showed successful delivery to both the epidermal and dermal regions, and in-use trial demonstrated that 1% A-A-A was well tolerated. In this study, the aim was to investigate whether A-A-A could stimulate the synthesis of extracellular matrix supporting proteins in vivo and thereby improving the viscoelastic properties of human skin by conducting a dual histological and biophysical clinical study. Method Two separate double-blind vehicle-controlled in vivo studies were conducted using a 1% A-A-A containing oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. In the histological study, 16 female volunteers (>55 years of age) exhibiting photodamaged skin on their forearm were included, investigating the effect of a 12-day treatment of A-A-A on collagen IV (COLIV) and fibrillin-1. In a subsequent pilot study, 0.1% retinol was used for comparison to A-A-A (1%). The biomechanical properties of the skin were assessed in a panel of 16 women (>45 years of age) using the standard Cutometer MPA580 after topical application of the test products for 28 days. The use of multiple suction enabled the assessment of F4, an area parameter specifically representing skin firmness. Results Twelve-day topical application of 1% A-A-A significantly increased COLIV and fibrillin with 13% and 6%, respectively, compared to vehicle. 1% A-A-A and 0.1% retinol were found to significantly reduce F4 after 28 days of treatment by 15.8% and 14.7%, respectively, in the pilot Cutometer study. No significant difference was found between retinol and A-A-A. However, only A-A-A exhibited a significant effect vs. vehicle on skin firmness which indicated the incremental benefit of A-A-A as a skin-firming active ingredient. Conclusion In this study, we showed the in vivo efficacy of 1% A-A-A both on a protein level (fibrillin and collagen IV) and on a clinical end point, specifically skin firmness, providing proof that, acetyl aspartic acid has a strong potential as an anti-ageing 'cosmeceutical' ingredient answering the needs of our key consumer base. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.


Mavon A.,Oriflame Skin Research Institute
International Journal of Cosmetic Science | Year: 2015

Background The megatrend of population ageing is leading to a growing demand for "anti-ageing" treatments, especially to prevent or treat skin ageing. Facing an increasing offer, consumers are choosing more and more skin care products supported by a scientific rationale, active ingredients and clinical proof of efficacy. Objective Considering consumer expectations, this research led to the discovery of acetyl aspartic acid (A-A-A), a novel active ingredient to improve sagging skin and loss of skin firmness. Results This supplement is featuring seven manuscripts aiming at presenting the research and investigations from consumer insights, discovery of A-A-A, its in vitro activity confirmation, safety assessment, formulation and its dermal absorption to the clinical proof of efficacy, investigated through two pilots' double bind randomized and placebo controlled studies on photo-aged skin. Conclusion This extensive research enabled us to discover A-A-A, as an active ingredient with potential to repair sign of skin ageing and supported by clinical proof of efficacy. This active ingredient will be soon launched in a commercial innovative skin care range, delivering desirable anti-wrinkle and skin lifting benefits. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

Loading Oriflame Skin Research Institute collaborators
Loading Oriflame Skin Research Institute collaborators