Organica University Nacinal Of Tucuman

San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina

Organica University Nacinal Of Tucuman

San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina
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Kapoor I.P.S.,Ddu Gorakhpur University | Singh B.,Ddu Gorakhpur University | Singh G.,Ddu Gorakhpur University | de Heluani C.S.,Organica University Nacinal Of Tucuman | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture | Year: 2010

BACKGROUND: The present study describes the chemical analysis of the essential oil and oleoresins from caraway, which have been studied by using GC-MS. The paper also explains the importance of the extracted oil and oleoresins in the antioxidant activities of target plant species. RESULTS: GC-MS analysis of caraway essential oil showed 51 compounds representing about 96.6% of the total weight. The major components were dillapiole (44.6%), germacrene-β (14.1%), nothoapiole (8.3%), and β-selinene (6.8%), along with many other components in minor amounts. Major components in ethyl acetate and iso-octane oleoresins are dillapiole, nothoapiole and germacrene-β, whereas in ethanol oleoresin contains dillapiole (25%), sitosterol (21.3%) stigmasterol (9.5%) and nothoapiole (8.1%). The antioxidant activity was evaluated by various antioxidant assays such as peroxide, thiobarbituric acid and p-anisidine values. These experiments were further supported by other complementary antioxidant assays such as ferric thiocyanate method in linoleic acid system, reducing power, and scavenging effects on 1,1′-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Both the caraway volatile oil and its oleoresins showed strong antioxidant activity in comparison with butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). CONCLUSION: This study provides additional information about the chemistry and antioxidant activity of caraway. Hence, caraway may be used as natural food preservatives. © 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.


Kapoor I.P.S.,Ddu Gorakhpur University | Singh B.,Ddu Gorakhpur University | Singh G.,Ddu Gorakhpur University | De Heluani C.S.,Organica University Nacinal Of Tucuman | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Food Properties | Year: 2013

Essential oil and oleoresins (ethanol, ethyl acetate, and iso-propyl alcohol) of Myristica fragrans were extracted by using Clevenger and Soxhlet apparatus, respectively. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of essential oil showed the presence of 38 components representing about 99.6% of the total weight. Sabinene (29.4%) was found to be a major component along with beta pinene (10.6%), alpha pinene (10.1%), terpene-4-ol (9.6%), and several other minor components. The major component of all oleoresins contained elemicin. It has been observed that the essential oil and ethanol oleoresin showed better activity compared to other tested oleoresins and synthetic antioxidants, butylated hydroxyl anisole and butylated hydroxyl toluene. Furthermore, the activity of essential oil and oleoresins was measured for the inhibition of primary and secondary oxidation products in mustard oil by using peroxide, thiobarbituric acid, and p-anisidine values. In addition, these experiments were further supported by other complementary antioxidant assays, such as ferric thiocyanate method in a linoleic acid system, reducing power, chelating effect, and scavenging effects on 1,1′-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical. Hence, the essential oil and ethanol oleoresin of M. fragrans could be considered as a natural food preservative. Copyright © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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