Oral Health science Center

Chandigarh, India

Oral Health science Center

Chandigarh, India

Time filter

Source Type

Mittal N.,Santosh Dental College and Hospital | Goyal A.,Oral Health science Center | Gauba K.,Oral Health science Center | Kapur A.,Oral Health science Center
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry | Year: 2013

Objective: To find out the safe and efficient sedative agent for primary molar pulpectomy in uncooperative pediatric patients. Study Design: This double blind randomized trial enrolled 40 anxious and healthy 2-6 year olds. All subjects received IV propofol (1-1.5mg/kg) or ketofol (1-1.5 mg/kg propofol with 0.25mg/kg ketamine) as per group assignment after oral midazolam premedication (0.5 mg/kg). Sedation maintenance was done with propofol infusion at 25-75?g/kg/min titrated to a predefined Worse level as per Houpt's sedation rating scale. Additional bolus/es was/were administered in the dosage similar to induction dose in case of inadequate sedation. Primary outcomes were intraoperative and postoperative adverse events. Secondary outcomes were vital signs, success of procedure, operator satisfaction, sedation quality, treatment time, recovery time and total propofol dose. Results: Significantly greater incidence of respiratory depression was reported for ketofol group (11/20; 55%) when compared to propofol group (3/20; 15%) (p = 0.008). Desaturation was the most common adverse respiratory event with significantly greater incidence in ketofol group (9/20; 45%) when compared to propofol only group (3/20; 15%) (p = 0.033). No significant differences regarding secondary outcomes were reported in two groups. Conclusion: Both the regimen exhibited similar sedation profile while propofol alone emerged as a safer option.


Mittal N.P.,Santosh Dental College and Hospital | Goyal A.,Oral Health science Center | Gauba K.,Oral Health science Center | Kapur A.,Oral Health science Center
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry | Year: 2014

There is rarity of prevalence data on molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) for the Indian population and the majority of data originated from European countries. Aim: To report on prevalence and defect characteristics of MIH for school children of the northern Indian region. Methods: A cross-sectional survey including 1,792, 6-9-year-old school children of Chandigarh, India was carried out using European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) 2003 criteria for diagnosis of MIH. In addition to descriptive analysis for distribution of various defects, comparative data analysis was carried out for inter-comparison of distribution and type of defect amongst two phenotypes, MH [first permanent molar (FPMs) involvement] and M + IH (simultaneous involvement of molars and incisors). Similar comparative analysis was performed for four subgroups on the basis of number of affected surfaces/subjects. Results: A prevalence of 6.31 % was reported. FPMs (2.83 ± 0.874/subject) were more commonly affected than permanent incisors (1.19 ± 1.614/subjects). White/creamy opacity without post-eruptive breakdown (PEB) was the most common lesion, seen in 85 % of subjects. MH phenotype was seen in 44 % of subjects and 56 % exhibited M + IH phenotype. A trend toward greater severity was seen in M + IH phenotype when compared to MH phenotype. A greater number of surfaces presented with white/creamy opacities without PEB (p < 0.05). With an increase in the number of surfaces involved the severity of MIH also increased with more frequent presence of brown defects with PEB. Conclusion: With concomitant involvement of incisors, more severe presentation of MIH was seen. Also, with increase in number of affected surfaces a parallel increase in severity as well as extent of lesions was observed. © 2013 European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry.


Bhandari S.,Oral Health science Center | Bakshi S.,Chitkara University
Indian Journal of Dental Research | Year: 2013

Spacing in dentition negatively interferes with harmony of the smile. A lot of literature has been devoted to prosthetic closure of such space(s) in the dentition; however, the only option for maintaining space(s) in tooth-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) is with the aid of loop connectors. Eleven patients (seven males and four females) with mean age of 45.18 years (range 22-70 years), previously treated with porcelain fused to metal full coverage restorations joined with loop connectors, were evaluated clinically to assess the clinical status and longevity of treatment provided. All the patients were asked to fill a simple close-ended questionnaire to provide their perspective on the limitations and outcome of the treatment and rate their satisfaction level on the scale of 1-10. The cumulative survival of the FDPs with the aid of loop connectors was 90.9%. There was no reported esthetic failure and, at the time of responding to the questionnaire, none of the patients had active complaint with respect to the prosthesis and all but one of the patients were satisfied with the treatment provided. Clinical survivability and the patient feedback suggests that customized designing of loop connectors for each patient is an excellent treatment modality to successfully maintain excessive (single/generalized) spacing between teeth and effectively splint pathologically migrated and mobile teeth. The reported problems with this treatment option are all transient in nature.


Jena A.K.,Oral Health science Center
The Angle orthodontist | Year: 2011

To test the hypothesis that there is no difference in hyoid bone position among subjects with different vertical jaw dysplasias. Seventy-one North Indian adult male and female subjects in the age range of 15 to 25 years were selected for the study. Based on the vertical growth pattern of the face, subjects were divided into Group I (n = 24; subjects in whom both Frankfort mandibular plane angle [FMA] and basal plane angle measured 20 to 25 degrees), Group II (n = 17; subjects in whom both FMA and basal plane angle measured <15 degrees), and Group III (n = 30; subjects in whom both FMA and basal plane angle measured >30 degrees). Lateral cephalograms with the mandible in rest position were traced and analyzed manually for evaluation of hyoid bone position. The anteroposterior position of the hyoid bone was significantly forward in subjects with short face syndrome compared with normal subjects (P < .05) and subjects with long face syndrome (P < .001). The vertical position of the hyoid bone was comparable among subjects with different vertical jaw dysplasias. The axial inclination of the hyoid bone was more oblique in subjects with long face syndrome than in those with short face syndrome (P < .01). The anteroposterior position of the hyoid bone was more forward in subjects with short face syndrome. The vertical position of the hyoid bone was comparable among subjects with different vertical jaw dysplasias. The axial inclination of the hyoid bone closely followed the axial inclination of the mandible.


Kumar A.,PGIMER | Bhattacharyya S.,PGIMER | Rattan V.,Oral Health Science Center
Cell and Tissue Banking | Year: 2015

Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) hold great promise as a source of adult stem cells for utilization in regenerative medicine. Successful storage and post thaw recovery of DPSCs without loss of function is a key issue for future clinical application. Most of the cryopreservation methods use controlled rate freezing and vapor phase nitrogen to store stem cells. But these methods are both expensive and laborious. In this study, we isolated DPSCs from a patient undergoing impacted mandibular third molar extraction. We adopted eight different methods of cryopreservation at −80 °C for long term storage of the DPSC aliquots. Various parameters like proliferation, cell death, cell cycle, retention of stemness markers and differentiation potential were studied post cryopreservation period of 1 year. We observed successful recovery of stem cells in every method and a significant difference in proliferation potential and cell death between samples stored by different methods. However, post thaw, all cells retained their stemness markers. All DPSCs stored by different methods were able to differentiate into osteoblast like cells, adipocytes and neural cells. Based on these parameters we concluded that uncontrolled freezing at a temperature of −80 °C is as effective as controlled freezing using ethanol vessels and other cryopreservation methods. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides the first proof of concept that long term storage in uncontrolled freezing of cells at −80 °C in 10 % DMSO does not affect the revival capacity of hDPSCs. This implies that DPSCs may be used successfully for tissue engineering and cell based therapeutics even after long term, uncontrolled cryopreservation. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Madan N.,Bhojia Dental College and Hospital | Pannu K.,Oral Health science Center
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry | Year: 2011

The success of all-ceramic crowns and increased patient demand for metal-free, tooth-colored restorations has led to the development of many different restorative systems for all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). The most recent core materials for all-ceramic FDPs are the yttrium-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP)-based materials. Yttrium oxide is a stabilizing oxide added to pure zirconia to stabilize it at room temperature and to generate a multiphase material known as partially stabilized zirconia. This exhibits very high flexural strength and fracture toughness along with good biocompatibility and excellent esthetics. This clinical report describes the use of the Lava All-ceramic system, based on Y-TZP, for the fabrication of two fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) in the maxillary anterior region of the patient, restoring both esthetics and function.


PubMed | Oral Health Science Center and PGIMER
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Cell and tissue banking | Year: 2015

Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) hold great promise as a source of adult stem cells for utilization in regenerative medicine. Successful storage and post thaw recovery of DPSCs without loss of function is a key issue for future clinical application. Most of the cryopreservation methods use controlled rate freezing and vapor phase nitrogen to store stem cells. But these methods are both expensive and laborious. In this study, we isolated DPSCs from a patient undergoing impacted mandibular third molar extraction. We adopted eight different methods of cryopreservation at -80C for long term storage of the DPSC aliquots. Various parameters like proliferation, cell death, cell cycle, retention of stemness markers and differentiation potential were studied post cryopreservation period of 1year. We observed successful recovery of stem cells in every method and a significant difference in proliferation potential and cell death between samples stored by different methods. However, post thaw, all cells retained their stemness markers. All DPSCs stored by different methods were able to differentiate into osteoblast like cells, adipocytes and neural cells. Based on these parameters we concluded that uncontrolled freezing at a temperature of -80C is as effective as controlled freezing using ethanol vessels and other cryopreservation methods. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides the first proof of concept that long term storage in uncontrolled freezing of cells at -80C in 10% DMSO does not affect the revival capacity of hDPSCs. This implies that DPSCs may be used successfully for tissue engineering and cell based therapeutics even after long term, uncontrolled cryopreservation.


PubMed | SDCH, Oral Health Science Center and JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of conservative dentistry : JCD | Year: 2016

The Journal of Conservative Dentistry (JCD) has been online since 2008.This paper reviews the publication in this journal over a 5-year period (2011-2015). It assesses the types of articles published, coverage of various types of subjects of endodontics, and conservative dentistry in the journal and explores the authorship patterns in the publication and citation of the journal over this period.JCD has delivered broad-based, balanced coverage of endodontics and conservative dentistry between 2011 and 2015, with contributions from all over India, as well as abroad. Although a maximum number of articles were from India, the publications from other countries are also on an increase. Thus, the widespread coverage of this journal suggests that JCD has begun to represent the global face of the Indian Association of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics.


PubMed | Oral Health science Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of Indian Prosthodontic Society | Year: 2016

In the era of implant supported restorations, conventional complete denture (CD) for isolated edentulous maxilla still remains the first choice of treatment despite being its frequent mechanical failures.Edentulous maxillary arch restored with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) based CDs when opposed by natural and/or restored dentition is biomechanically and functionally a compromised rehabilitation.Seven patients (4 males, 3 females) in the age range of 55-75 years were treated for their frequent fracture of the single maxillary denture. They were asked to rate their prosthodontic experience on a scale of 1-10. They were further inquired about the awareness of their clinical condition and knowledge on the alternative treatment options available to them, number of different dentists they have been treated by and frequency of their re-visits to the dental office after being edentulous.Removable PMMA based CD in maxilla was the first choice of treatment for all the restorative dentists who treated these patients. No attempt was ever made to treat the opposing dentition in any of the seven patients. Despite being under regular prosthodontic care for fabrication and repairs by as many as 23 dentists, none of the patients was aware of their clinical situation and the alternative treatment options available.It is imperative that the restorative dentist be aware of the perils of such inter-arch relationships. Appropriate treatment done on time may avert a situation where the oral conditions become incompatible for the longevity of treatment done even with the aid of dental implants.


PubMed | Oral health science Center and PGIMER
Type: | Journal: Molecular neurobiology | Year: 2016

Dental tissue is emerging as a promising source of stem cells especially in nerve regeneration mainly due to their neural origin and ease of harvest. We isolated dental stem cells from three sources, namely, dental pulp (DPSCs), dental follicle (DFSCs), and apical papilla (SCAP), and explored the efficacy of each towards neural differentiation in comparison to bone marrow-derived stem cells. The neural differentiation potential was assessed by expression of various neural markers and neurosphere assay. We observed that DPSCs were inherently predisposed towards neural lineage. To further delineate the paracrine cues responsible for the differences in neural differentiation potential, we harvested the conditioned secretome from each of the stem cell population and observed their effect on colony formation, neurite extension, and neural gene expression of IMR-32, a pre-neuroblastic cell line. We found that neural differentiation was significantly enhanced when IMR-32 cells were treated with secretome derived from DMSCs as compared to the same from BMSCs. Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine array revealed DPSC secretome had higher expression of the cytokines like GCSF, IFN, and TGF that promote neural differentiation. Thus, we concluded that DPSCs may be the preferred source of cells for obtaining neural lineage among the four sources of stem cells. Our results also indicate that the DPSC-secreted factors may be responsible for their propensity towards neural differentiation. This study suggests that DPSCs and their secretomes can be a potentially lucrative source for cell-based and cell-free (secretome) therapy for neural disorders and injury.

Loading Oral Health science Center collaborators
Loading Oral Health science Center collaborators