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News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BUFFALO, N.Y. - Nearly 90 percent of patients at long-term care facilities don't take advantage of dental services, even when they are free, a recent study by University at Buffalo researchers has found. The research, published last month in Special Care in Dentistry, found that the longer a patient stayed at a long-term care facility, such as a nursing home or assisted living facility, the more likely they were to use dental services. But even among those who stayed at the facility for years, just 55 percent of patients used the services. The low usage rate at long-term care facilities echoes a similar issue among the general population. In fact, according to 2014 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly four in 10 American adults don't visit the dentist. "There is a problem within the population as a whole toward appreciation for dental care. The perception is that if you don't have pain, you don't have a problem," says Frank A. Scannapieco, DMD, PhD, lead investigator on the study and chair of the Department of Oral Biology in the UB School of Dental Medicine. The study examined the dental and medical records of more than 2,500 residents at the Brothers of Mercy Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Clarence who were discharged between 2008 and 2012. Among the group, only 10 percent received a dental exam at least once during their stay. The average length of stay at the facility was two years, with nearly half of patients staying less than a month. Usage rates of dental services ranged from 7 percent for patients who stayed less than a month, to 30 percent for those who stayed between a month and two years. Usage rates increased to 55 percent among those who stayed beyond two years. Age was also a factor. Patients who were 76 years of age and older were twice as likely to use dental services compared to their younger counterparts. Patients with endocrine, nutritional, metabolic, immunity disorders, mental disorders and circulatory system diseases were more likely to receive dental services as well. Scannapieco suggests that for patients staying less than a month, often for short-term rehabilitation, medical treatment took priority over dental services. These patients were also likely to have their own dentists outside of the facility. However, he said, he was surprised to find that the usage of dental services remained low among the rest of patients. The New York State Department of Health requires that all patients newly admitted to long-term care facilities be offered dental services upon admission and annually afterwards. The patients are saying no. Financial barriers are a common deterrent for patients in need of dental care, says Scannapieco. And Medicare, he adds, does not cover many procedures. But Medicare does cover dental exams. In many cases, he finds, oral health care takes a backseat to other medical needs. Improving attitudes toward dental care may lie in connecting oral health with overall health and quality of life, says Scannapieco. "We need to do the research that answers if excellent dental health translates into prolonged life, health and perceptions of quality of life," says Scannapieco. "That is one of the major questions around dental care that is still unanswered: Does optimal dental care prevent medical diseases." Other investigators on the study include Mine Tezal, DDS, PhD, assistant professor in the UB School of Dental Medicine, and UB dental students Marc Salme and Summar Amin.


News Article | November 19, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Patients who are in need of a periodontist in Lakewood Ranch, FL can now see Dr. Justin Craighead for treatment, the newest member of Dr. Lindsay Eastman’s modern dental practice. Dr. Craighead recently joined Dr. Eastman’s team, and has already shown that he is a valuable asset to the practice. As the only dual specialist in periodontics and prosthodontics in the state of Florida, Dr. Craighead is an authority on implant dentistry and the treatment of advanced dental issues. Dr. Craighead first graduated from the University of Florida where he received a Bachelor’s of Science in Business Administration with a major in finance. Dr. Craighead then went on to complete 11 years of training in dentistry. He started with earning a Doctorate of Dental Medicine degree from Boston University, Goldman School of Dental Medicine. Afterwards, he attended an Advanced Education in General Dentistry residency at Boston University where he received the excellence award for best exemplifying excellence in character and clinical proficiency. Following his time in residency, he became the first in Florida to receive dual certificates in both Periodontics and Prosthodontics, after completing residencies in each specialty from the University of Florida College Of Dentistry. A Fellow in the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Dr. Craighead is proud to add his achievements to the Eastman Team and hopes to provide many patients with high quality periodontal care in Lakewood Ranch, FL and Bradenton, FL. Dr. Craighead values sharing his passion for dentistry and has been an instructor and co-developer of the advanced surgical curriculums in the Department of Restorative Science, Graduate Prosthodontics program at the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry and actively seeks volunteer work in his community. As both a prosthodontist and periodontist in Lakewood Ranch, FL and Bradenton, FL. Dr. Craighead offers unique insights into a variety of conditions, leading treatments and advanced treatment planning for each patient. Patients who are interested in receiving care from an acclaimed prosthodontist and periodontist, including laser gum therapy, dental implants, gum recession treatment, and other treatments, are invited to contact Dr. Eastman’s practice by calling 941-351-3000 or 941-792-3899. Lindsay B. Eastman, DDS, MS, PA is an experienced periodontist offering patients personalized dental care since 1980. Dr. Eastman has two practice locations in, Bradenton, FL and Lakewood Ranch, FL. Dr. Eastman received his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Loyola University Dental School where he completed his postgraduate training in Periodontics and his Masters of Science in Oral Biology. He received his Post-Graduate specialty training in the Surgical Placement of Dental Implants from Northwestern University Dental School, and completed Business Management Training from Pride Institute. He is part of only one percent of dental professionals providing the LANAP® FDA cleared laser procedure for gum disease and periodontal treatment. To learn more about Dr. Eastman, his associates and his dental services, visit his website at http://www.eastmanonline.com and call (941) 792-3899 for the Bradenton location or (941) 351-3000 for the Lakewood Ranch location for a personalized consultation.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Los Angeles dentist, Dr. Bijan, Afar comments on the results of this new study showing the benefits of laser treatments in dentistry. Dental lasers may just be the best new tool in the fight against oral bacteria. A new study reveals that dental lasers are highly effective in killing bacteria and eliminating colonies in diseased gum tissue, according to Medical News Today. The new study, which was published in “Lasers in Surgery and Medicine,” revealed that lasers can be used to debride diseased tissue, kill bacteria and promote better dental health. Oral bacteria colonize gum tissue, and they can attack the tissues and bones that support teeth, breaking them down. This is a condition known as periodontal disease. “Conventional gum disease treatments have included deep cleaning procedures and surgical treatments” said Dr. Afar. The researchers in this study used computer simulations to show how lasers could destroy bacterial colonies in the mouth using a variety of mathematical models based on known characteristics of gum disease and bacteria. According to Dr. Afar “the simulations validated the use of lasers as an acceptable treatment for gum disease by showing that healthy tissues could be spared while bacteria would continue to be killed up to 3 mm deep in the gums.” The study also enabled researchers to better identify the best lasers and techniques to use for killing the bacteria strains involved in gum disease. Periodontal disease is a serious condition with serious consequences. Early symptoms include inflammation, swelling, bleeding and tenderness. Causes can vary, according to Dr. Bijan Afar. “There can be a number of factors,” he said. “However, one reason is because of poor hygiene. If you don’t take care of your teeth and brush and floss them properly on a daily basis, your teeth and gums suffer. Left untreated, it can lead to loss of teeth.” For more information, visit http://www.wilshiredentalcare.com. Dr. Afar is a graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry. After receiving his MS in Oral Biology and his DDS, he continued his studies in oral implantology and periodontology at the University of Washington, Seattle, where he earned his specialty degree in periodontology. Today, Dr. Afar is a member of the American Dental Association, the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, the Academy of Osseointegration and the American Academy of Periodontology.


News Article | November 11, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Lindsay Eastman is pleased to announce that Dr. Christie Eastman, his daughter, has recently joined him at his cutting-edge dental practices in both Lakewood Ranch and Bradenton, FL locations. Dr. Christie Eastman brings the latest training for effective and minimally-invasive techniques for a variety of periodontal care, including dental implants and laser gum disease therapy, to her community. Dr. Christie Eastman has always had a strong passion for academics. She started her journey in Bradenton then attended Rollins College where she earned her Bachelor of Science with Honors in Biology. She then went on to attend the University of Florida College Of Dentistry where she earned her Doctorate of Dental Medicine Degree, graduating at the top of her class. After earning her dental degree, she completed her post graduate training in a highly competitive periodontics residency program at the University of Florida. During residency, she received a Master of Science Degree and a Professional Certificate in Periodontics. Dedicated to her education, Dr. Eastman takes pride in regularly completing continuing education courses in areas such as dental implants, laser dentistry, gum recession treatment, and other periodontal treatments, in order to offer her patients modern, gentle and effective techniques using the latest technology. Offering her care to the underserved, Dr. Eastman has provided necessary dental care on a mission trip to Guatemala and volunteered at the Gainesville Community Ministries dental clinic. She is also an instructor in the University of Florida Continuing Education Department, where she teaches dental hygienists how to administer local anesthesia and shares her passion of providing excellent dental care. Those receiving care from a periodontist in Bradenton, FL and Lakewood Ranch, FL can be assured that their doctor is not only highly-trained, but is a specialist in periodontal treatment. Sharing her father’s desire to understand the unique needs of each patient, Dr. Christie Eastman ensures every patient understands their treatment plans and receives personalized care. Those who would like to learn more about receiving periodontal treatment, including dental implants, gum recession treatment, and laser dentistry from Drs. Eastman are encouraged to schedule a consultation by calling their offices at 941-792-3899 or 941-351-3000. Lindsay B. Eastman, DDS, MS, PA is an experienced periodontist offering patients personalized dental care since 1980. Dr. Eastman has two practice locations in, Bradenton, FL and Lakewood Ranch, FL. Dr. Eastman received his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Loyola University Dental School where he completed his postgraduate training in Periodontics and his Masters of Science in Oral Biology. He received his Post-Graduate specialty training in the Surgical Placement of Dental Implants from Northwestern University Dental School, and completed Business Management Training from Pride Institute. He is part of only one percent of dental professionals providing the LANAP® FDA cleared laser procedure for gum disease and periodontal treatment. To learn more about Dr. Eastman, his associates and his dental services, visit his website at http://www.eastmanonline.com and call (941) 792-3899 for the Bradenton location or (941) 351-3000 for the Lakewood Ranch location for a personalized consultation.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Marco A. Cueva recently attended a continuing education (CE) course dedicated to enhancing patient care and practice growth called, Catalyst, by Progressive Dental. Dr. Cueva, a respected periodontist in Allen, TX, offers a variety of dental treatments including single dental implants and the All-on-4® dental implant technique. Dr. Cueva is dedicated to offering comfortable and effective care from the first examination to the implementation of a customized plan, and through the recovery process. When visiting a periodontist in Allen, TX, to learn about their tooth replacement options, individuals want to feel that their unique needs are being addressed, and that they are receiving services that are personalized to their situations. This includes making sure that insurance coverage is maximized and payment options are discussed, as well as the benefits of the care plan developed between Dr. Cueva and the patient. He regularly attends training that allows him to not only adopt new techniques, technology and procedures, but courses such as Catalyst to understand how best to connect with each patient to determine their specific needs. Dr. Cueva is Board Certified by the American Board of Periodontology, and is a leading specialist in the placement of dental implants. He is proficient in communicating treatment goals with his patients in a way that is easily understood, so they know what to expect throughout the process. On the professional level, he shares his knowledge through publications in the field and speaking engagements at state, national and international organizations. He is also an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University Health Science Center – Baylor College of Dentistry. More information about dental implants and the treatment methods offered at Dr. Cueva’s practice is available on his website at http://www.perioexcellence.com. People in Allen, TX, interested in the benefits of permanent tooth replacement options can schedule an appointment for an examination and consultation with Dr. Cueva by calling (972) 704-1101. Periodontic Excellence is a periodontal practice offering personalized dental care for patients in Allen, TX. Dr. Marco Cueva is a Board Certified Periodontist and has extensive education in periodontology and dental implantology. He attended the Federal University of Parana where he received his Doctor of Dental Surgery Degree, and completed three additional years of training at Camillo Castelo Branco University, before training at Baylor College of Dentistry. Dr. Cueva also earned his Masters of Science Degree in Oral Biology with a certification in Periodontics from Texas A&M University Health Science Center- Baylor College of Dentistry. Dr. Cueva offers a variety of services, specializing in dental implants, All-on-4® and the minimally invasive Chao Pinhole® Surgical Technique for treating receding gums. To learn more about the services offered at Periodontic Excellence, please visit the website at http://www.perioexcellence.com or call (972) 704-1101 to schedule an appointment.


Carroll J.D.,THOR Photomedicine Ltd. | Milward M.R.,Oral Biology | Cooper P.R.,Oral Biology | Hadis M.,University of Birmingham | Palin W.M.,University of Birmingham
Dental Materials | Year: 2014

Objectives Low level light/laser therapy (LLLT) is the direct application of light to stimulate cell responses (photobiomodulation) in order to promote tissue healing, reduce inflammation and induce analgesia. There have been significant studies demonstrating its application and efficacy at many sites within the body and for treatment of a range of musculoskeletal injuries, degenerative diseases and dysfunction, however, its use on oral tissues has, to date, been limited. The purpose of this review is to consider the potential for LLLT in dental and oral applications by providing background information on its mechanism of action and delivery parameters and by drawing parallels with its treatment use in analogous cells and tissues from other sites of the body. Methods A literature search on Medline was performed on laser and light treatments in a range of dental/orofacial applications from 2010 to March 2013. The search results were filtered for LLLT relevance. The clinical papers were then arranged to eight broad dental/orofacial categories and reviewed. Results The initial search returned 2778 results, when filtered this was reduced to 153. 41 were review papers or editorials, 65 clinical and 47 laboratory studies. Of all the publications, 130 reported a positive effect in terms of pain relief, fast healing or other improvement in symptoms or appearance and 23 reported inconclusive or negative outcomes. Direct application of light as a therapeutic intervention within the oral cavity (rather than photodynamic therapies, which utilize photosensitizing solutions) has thus far received minimal attention. Data from the limited studies that have been performed which relate to the oral cavity indicate that LLLT may be a reliable, safe and novel approach to treating a range of oral and dental disorders and in particular for those which there is an unmet clinical need. Significance The potential benefits of LLLT that have been demonstrated in many healthcare fields and include improved healing, reduced inflammation and pain control, which suggest considerable potential for its use in oral tissues. © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials.


Jakubovics N.S.,Oral Biology
Molecular Oral Microbiology | Year: 2010

Mature dental biofilms consist of towering microcolonies in which the resident bacterial cells interact with one another and exchange messages in the form of signalling molecules and metabolites. These structures have been compared with the bustling office blocks and apartment buildings of busy cities. Social and communication networks are the lifeblood of large communities, and there is mounting evidence that mutually beneficial interactions between microbial cells are essential to the development of biofilms in the oral cavity. This review discusses the mutualistic partnerships that form between oral bacteria, and the contribution of interspecies communication to the formation of mixed microbial communities. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Frederikse P.H.,Oral Biology | Nandanoor A.,Oral Biology | Kasinathan C.,Oral Biology
Neurochemical Research | Year: 2015

Fmr1 and FMRP underlie Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) and are linked with related autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Fmr1 also has an essential role in eye and lens development. Lenses express FMRP along with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs), post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), Tyr-phosphatase STEP, CaMKIIα and Alzheimer’s disease Aβ precursor protein, which are verified targets of FMRP regulation in neurons and outline major topics in FXS/ASD research. PSD-95 as well as CaMKIIα transcripts undergo polypryimidine tract binding protein dependent alternative splicing in lens, consistent with PSD-95 translation in lens. At least 13 GABAR subunits and GAD25/65/67 GABA metabolism enzymes are expressed in lenses beginning in embryonic development, matching neural development. Interestingly, GABAergic drugs (e.g. baclofen) studied as FXS/ASD therapeutics are shown to resolve developmental vision defects in experimental myopia. Here, we demonstrated that FMRP co-localizes at fiber cell membranes with PSD-95, GABAAδ, GABAAβ3, GABBR1, STEP, CaMKIIα, and mGluR5 in young adult lenses. GAD65 and GABA detection was greatest at the peri-nuclear lens region where fiber cell terminal differentiation occurs. These findings add to an extensive list of detailed parallels between fiber cell and neuron morphology and their lateral membrane spine/protrusions, also reflected in the shared expression of genes involved in the morphogenesis and function of these membrane structures, and shared use of associated regulatory mechanisms first described as distinguishing the neuronal phenotype. Future studies can determine if GABA levels currently studied as a FXS/ASD biomarker in the brain, and generated by GAD25/65/67 in a comparable cell environment in the lens, may be similarly responsive to Fmr1 mutation in lens. The present demonstration of FMRP and key regulatory targets in the lens identifies a potential for the lens to provide a new research venue, in the same individual, to inform about Fmr1/FMRP pathobiology in brain as well as lens. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


PubMed | Oral Biology, University of Manitoba, The Manitoba Institute of Child Health and New York University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pediatrics | Year: 2014

Inadequate maternal vitamin D (assessed by using 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25OHD]) levels during pregnancy may affect tooth calcification, predisposing enamel hypoplasia and early childhood caries (ECC). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between prenatal 25OHD concentrations and dental caries among offspring during the first year of life.This prospective cohort study recruited expectant mothers from an economically disadvantaged urban area. A prenatal questionnaire was completed and serum sample drawn for 25OHD. Dental examinations were completed at 1 year of age while the parent/caregiver completed a questionnaire. The examiner was blinded to mothers 25OHD levels. A P value .05 was considered significant.Overall, 207 women were enrolled (mean age: 19 5 years). The mean 25OHD level was 48 24 nmol/L, and 33% had deficient levels. Enamel hypoplasia was identified in 22% of infants; 23% had cavitated ECC, and 36% had ECC when white spot lesions were included in the assessment. Mothers of children with ECC had significantly lower 25OHD levels than those whose children were caries-free (41 20 vs 52 27 nmol/L; P = .05). Univariate Poisson regression analysis for the amount of untreated decay revealed an inverse relationship with maternal 25OHD. Logistic regression revealed that enamel hypoplasia (P < .001), infant age (P = .002), and lower prenatal 25OHD levels (P = .02) were significantly associated with ECC.This study found that maternal prenatal 25OHD levels may have an influence on the primary dentition and the development of ECC.


Fmr1 and FMRP underlie Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) and are linked with related autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Fmr1 also has an essential role in eye and lens development. Lenses express FMRP along with -aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs), post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), Tyr-phosphatase STEP, CaMKII and Alzheimers disease A precursor protein, which are verified targets of FMRP regulation in neurons and outline major topics in FXS/ASD research. PSD-95 as well as CaMKII transcripts undergo polypryimidine tract binding protein dependent alternative splicing in lens, consistent with PSD-95 translation in lens. At least 13 GABAR subunits and GAD25/65/67 GABA metabolism enzymes are expressed in lenses beginning in embryonic development, matching neural development. Interestingly, GABAergic drugs (e.g. baclofen) studied as FXS/ASD therapeutics are shown to resolve developmental vision defects in experimental myopia. Here, we demonstrated that FMRP co-localizes at fiber cell membranes with PSD-95, GABAA, GABAA3, GABBR1, STEP, CaMKII, and mGluR5 in young adult lenses. GAD65 and GABA detection was greatest at the peri-nuclear lens region where fiber cell terminal differentiation occurs. These findings add to an extensive list of detailed parallels between fiber cell and neuron morphology and their lateral membrane spine/protrusions, also reflected in the shared expression of genes involved in the morphogenesis and function of these membrane structures, and shared use of associated regulatory mechanisms first described as distinguishing the neuronal phenotype. Future studies can determine if GABA levels currently studied as a FXS/ASD biomarker in the brain, and generated by GAD25/65/67 in a comparable cell environment in the lens, may be similarly responsive to Fmr1 mutation in lens. The present demonstration of FMRP and key regulatory targets in the lens identifies a potential for the lens to provide a new research venue, in the same individual, to inform about Fmr1/FMRP pathobiology in brain as well as lens.

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