Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

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Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Of, Turkey
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News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

An April 10 article in the Daily Mail describes the discovery in Northern Italy of a pair of ancient teeth, which reveal a great deal about prehistoric ice-age dental practitioners and their primitive and, no doubt, painful techniques. Archeologists have deduced that a sharp stone may have been used to remove decayed dental matter, and that teeth were then filled with bitumen, a substance similar to tar which today is used for roofing and road construction. Western San Fernando Valley-based dental office, Medical Center Dental Care, says that the finding is a potent reminder of the countless advances that have been made in dental care practices and technology that make 21st century oral care vastly more effective and comfortable than prior generations would have believed possible. The dental clinic notes that some of the latest advances in dental care include: Root canals – These procedures, which save teeth that have been seriously compromised by decay, have a fearsome reputation with many people. However, Medical Center Dental Care notes that, when performed properly using the latest techniques, root canals now involve remarkably very little discomfort, though they may take somewhat longer than most other common dental procedures. They note that their resident endodontist, Dr. Harry Malhotra, is the choice of many dentists when they need root canal therapy and he has achieved very wide acclaim for his ability to comfortably and conveniently restore teeth. Dental Implants – When teeth cannot be saved and need to be extracted, or are already missing, there are a few ways to address the situation. While dentures and bridgework are familiar solutions, and definitely much better than leaving teeth un-replaced, Medical Center Dental Group notes that oral health experts agree that dental implants are by far the best solution because, they not only function and look exactly like real teeth, they are the only type of replacements that actually prevent bone loss and other potentially seriously systemic health problems that appear to be associated with missing teeth. The clinic notes that its oral surgeon, Dr. Brijesh Patel, a respected specialist in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, has performed countless highly advanced procedures and his patients consistently report to the center’s staff that they are absolutely delighted with the ultimate outcomes of their work. Readers who would like to learn more about the many advanced options, including the very latest in cosmetic dentistry, available from Medical Center Dental Care may contact the clinic at (818) 452-0038. They may also learn more online at http://www.MC-WestHillsDentalCare.com.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Wayne B. Colin, DMD, MD, Otolaryngologist to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Wayne B. Colin is a highly trained and qualified physician with a vast expertise in all facets of his work. Dr. Colin has been in practice for more than three decades and is currently serving patients within the Lexington Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky. Dr. Colin obtained his Doctor of Dental Medicine Degree in 1985 from Harvard School of Dental Medicine, prior to completing an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery internship and fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital. He then attended Harvard Medical School, graduating in 1988. Upon receiving his Medical Degree, Dr. Colin returned to Massachusetts General Hospital to serve his Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery residency. He then completed an additional residency in Otolaryngology at the University of Tennessee, before undertaking his Head & Neck Microvascular fellowship at Barnes Hospital and Washington University. Dr. Colin is board certified in both Head and Neck Surgery, and Sleep Medicine by the American Board of Otolaryngology. He is renowned in Kentucky and beyond for his expertise in general adult ear, nose and throat disorders, hearing loss, tonsils/adenoidectomy, airway disorders, and congenital malformations. When he is not assisting patients, Dr. Colin enjoys computer programming. Learn more about Dr. Colin here: https://www.lexingtonclinic.com/ and be sure to read his upcoming publication in the Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "North America Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market (2016-2022)" report to their offering. The factors driving the growth of Cone Beam Computed Tomography market are increasing incidences of dental diseases and rise in the demand for cosmetic surgeries. Additionally, increasing application areas for CBCT scans, increasing dental problems in geriatric population and rising demand for digital dental imaging has positively impacted the growth of Cone Beam Computed Tomography. The important advantage of CBCT is that it provides 3D images in a single scan. Healthcare companies are playing an important role in the expansion of Cone Beam Imaging Systems market with the innovation of new technologies. Philips has also expanded its manufacturing for the production of advanced CBCT scanners. In addition to this, Royal Philips has announced launch of new augmented reality navigation technology which would help surgeons in performing image guided minimally invasive and open surgeries. The report highlights the adoption of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Systems in North America. Based on Application, the market is segmented into Dental Applications and Other Applications. Dental Applications is further divided into Implantology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Orthodontics, Endodontics, General Dentistry, Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Disorders, Periodontics, and Forensic Dentistry. Based on End-user, the market is segmented into Hospitals, Private Practices, and Academic & Research Institutes. The report also covers geographical segmentation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Systems market. The countries included in the report are U.S, Canada, Mexico and Rest of North America. The key players profiled in the report includes Danaher Corporation, Carestream Health, Inc., Planmeca Group, Cefla S.C., Dentsply Sirona, Asahi RoEntgen Ind. Co., Ltd., Vatech Co., Ltd., Prexion Corporation, J. Morita Mfg. Corp. and Curve Beam LLC. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/x749qs/north_america


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 3-Volume Set. Edition No. 3" book to their offering. Stay on top of the latest advances, treatments, and best practices with the new third edition of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. This trusted, three-volume resource covers the full scope of the field with up-to-date, evidence-based coverage of surgical procedures performed today - including cleft and craniofacial surgeries, oral surgery, oncologic surgery, orthognathic surgery, trauma surgery, surgical pathology, surgery of TMJ disorders, dental implants, dentoalveolar surgery, cosmetic surgery, and reconstructive surgery. More than 4,800 full-color images and illustrations serve as valuable visual references. You'll also find complete guidelines for a wide range of practice issues such as anesthesia, diagnostic imaging, treatment planning, psychological considerations, office design and ergonomics, plus new information on implants and orthognathic surgery. It's all the information you need to perfect your oral and maxillofacial surgical techniques and provide state-of-the-art care for your patients. For more information about this book visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/3frrjt/oral_and.


The Dentistry School of the University of Istanbul (IU), Istanbul, Turkey, joins Clinerion’s Patient Recruitment System platform, opening up new patient populations for patient recruitment and new clinical expertise areas for the running of clinical trials. By joining Patient Recruitment System (PRS), patients at the Dentistry School can be matched to clinical research studies seeking to recruit patients for trials. Pharmaceutical companies using Clinerion’s PRS will be able to evaluate the patient population of the dental hospital during the development of the trial protocol and the site selection steps of their drug trials, potentially bringing more international clinical research to Istanbul University. The hospital itself can rigorously identify and quickly enroll its own patients for trials using PRS. The IU Dentistry School specializes in all fields of dentistry, from Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery to Prosthodontics, from Periodontology to Pediatric Dentistry, Endodontics to Orthodontics. The hospital treated over 97,500 patients in the past year. Clinerion’s Patient Recruitment System finds patients for clinical trials by checking clinical trial requirements against patient data from the databases of connected hospitals in real-time. Clinerion’s hospital coverage in Turkey alone currently comprises hospitals in Istanbul, Konya and Malatya with a catchment area of 30 M people. PRS currently has access to over 350 M data entries. Additional use cases for PRS include Market Access Studies and Real World Data Analysis. “We see a great benefit for our patients as well as for our hospital,” says Prof. Dr. Gülsüm Ak, the Dean of the Dentistry School. “PRS will bring our patients access to innovative new treatments, while the Dentistry School will gain higher exposure and visibility for leading edge clinical research.” “The Dental Hospital of the University of Istanbul brings PRS new clinical expertise areas for the running of clinical trials and new patient populations for patient recruitment, expanding Clinerion’s hospitals coverage,” says Bariş Erdoğan, Clinerion’s Country Head Turkey. “The continued expansion of PRS in Turkey shows the productive and material benefits brought by Clinerion to clinical trials in Turkey.” “We are thrilled to welcome the Dental Hospital of Istanbul University to the Clinerion PRS platform,” says Ulf Claesson, CEO of Clinerion. “PRS will boost the number, quality and efficiency of their clinical trials activities, while also bringing their patients access to advanced medication.” For more on Clinerion’s Patient Recruitment System: www.clinerion.com/index/OverviewOurSolutions/PatientRecruitmentSystem Clinerion is an international technology services company offering highly scalable electronic patient recruitment solutions to increase efficiency and quality in clinical research. The company’s Patient Recruitment System connects to and leverages existing electronic medical records. Following international privacy and confidentiality standards, Clinerion’s solutions pseudonymize, enrich and normalize those records and facilitate real-time patient recruitment for clinical trials. Clinerion website: www.clinerion.com For more information, please contact:


By joining Patient Recruitment System (PRS), patients at the Dentistry School can be matched to clinical research studies seeking to recruit patients for trials. Pharmaceutical companies using Clinerion’s PRS will be able to evaluate the patient population of the dental hospital during the development of the trial protocol and the site selection steps of their drug trials, potentially bringing more international clinical research to Istanbul University. The hospital itself can rigorously identify and quickly enroll its own patients for trials using PRS. The IU Dentistry School specializes in all fields of dentistry, from Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery to Prosthodontics, from Periodontology to Pediatric Dentistry, Endodontics to Orthodontics. The hospital treated over 97,500 patients in the past year. Clinerion’s Patient Recruitment System finds patients for clinical trials by checking clinical trial requirements against patient data from the databases of connected hospitals in real-time. Clinerion’s hospital coverage in Turkey alone currently comprises hospitals in Istanbul, Konya and Malatya with a catchment area of 30 M people. PRS currently has access to over 350 M data entries. Additional use cases for PRS include Market Access Studies and Real World Data Analysis. “We see a great benefit for our patients as well as for our hospital,” says Prof. Dr. Gülsüm Ak, the Dean of the Dentistry School. “PRS will bring our patients access to innovative new treatments, while the Dentistry School will gain higher exposure and visibility for leading edge clinical research.” “The Dental Hospital of the University of Istanbul brings PRS new clinical expertise areas for the running of clinical trials and new patient populations for patient recruitment, expanding Clinerion’s hospitals coverage,” says Bariş Erdoğan, Clinerion’s Country Head Turkey. “The continued expansion of PRS in Turkey shows the productive and material benefits brought by Clinerion to clinical trials in Turkey.” “We are thrilled to welcome the Dental Hospital of Istanbul University to the Clinerion PRS platform,” says Ulf Claesson, CEO of Clinerion. “PRS will boost the number, quality and efficiency of their clinical trials activities, while also bringing their patients access to advanced medication.” For more on Clinerion’s Patient Recruitment System: http://www.clinerion.com/index/OverviewOurSolutions/PatientRecruitmentSystem Clinerion is an international technology services company offering highly scalable electronic patient recruitment solutions to increase efficiency and quality in clinical research. The company's Patient Recruitment System connects to and leverages existing electronic medical records. Following international privacy and confidentiality standards, Clinerion's solutions pseudonymize, enrich and normalize those records and facilitate real-time patient recruitment for clinical trials. Clinerion website: http://www.clinerion.com For more information, please contact: Le Vin Chin Head of Marketing and Communications Clinerion Ltd Margarethenstrasse 47, CH-4053 Basel, Switzerland Tel.: +41 61 865 60 54 media(at)clinerion(dot)com


News Article | September 1, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A fear of pain causes many people with dental phobias to avoid or delay needed treatment. In some cases, the injection of a numbing agent can be the most painful part of the visit. But with a new United States Food and Drug Administration-approved anesthetic that is administered with a brief nasal spray, that injection may not be necessary to achieve pain relief. The spray, a drug called Kovanaze, was deemed safe and effective in a recent Phase 3 clinical trial led by University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine researchers. The results of the study were published in the Journal of the American Dental Association. “There is really nothing else like this out there,” said Elliot V. Hersh, the study’s lead author and a professor in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pharmacology at Penn Dental Medicine. “This is obviously a great thing for needle-phobic individuals, and it can reduce inadvertent needle-stick injuries in the clinic as well.” The double-blind, randomized trial found that the compound, a combination of the local anesthetic tetracaine and the nasal decongestant oxymetazoline, was effective at preventing pain during a single restorative procedure in an upper bicuspid, canine or incisor in 88 percent of patients, a rate comparable to the success of commonly used injectable numbing agents. The most common side effects were runny nose and nasal congestion; no serious side effects were reported. Kovanaze was developed by St. Renatus and received FDA approval on June 29. The idea for Kovanaze, or K305, emerged when St. Renatus co-founder Mark Kollar was hit in the chin playing basketball, requiring 21 stitches. A fellow player happened to be an ear nose and throat specialist, who placed the sutures and also diagnosed Kollar with a deviated nasal septum. The ENT performed the septum repair and, when Kollar returned to his office for a follow-up visit, gave him a nasal spray containing tetracaine to remove a nasal stent. Once the stent was removed, Kollar noticed his teeth were numb. The ENT said a few other patients had reported the same sensation. Kollar, who happened to be a practicing dentist, went to his office to test his teeth with a dental electronic pulp stimulator and found that they were indeed numb. The serendipitous discovery led Kollar to found a company together with his business partner and co-founder Jim Mulvahill. Shortly after the project was initiated, Kollar and Mulvahill became aware that Bryan Clay, an ENT from Jackson, Miss., had a patent issued on the idea of an intranasal dental anesthetic. Mulvahill, Kollar and Clay combined their resources, with Kollar taking the lead in formulation and scientific development. Kollar’s research refined the anesthesia formula, leading to the invention of  Kovanaze and additional patent protection. To lead the Phase 3 trial, St. Renatus reached out to Penn Dental Medicine and Hersh, who had previously evaluated the safety and efficacy of a number of analgesic drugs including an early safety study on Kovanaze. The trial recruited 150 adults who passed a health screening and were set to undergo a single dental filling in an upper bicuspid, canine or incisor. One hundred patients were assigned Kovanaze and 50 were assigned a placebo. Patients received one spray, waited four minutes, received a second spray, waited 10 minutes and then a test drilling was performed. If the patients experienced pain at that point, they received a third spray. Patients who still experienced pain at that point received a rescue injection of local anesthetic to complete the procedure. Patients’ heart rate and blood pressure were recorded at various times throughout the visit. Eighty-eight percent of the people who received Kovanaze were able to have the dental restorative procedure completed without a rescue injection, compared to 28 percent for the placebo vehicle spray. Before receiving the spray, all patients were given what’s known as an alcohol sniff test to measure baseline sense of smell. Repeating the test just after the procedure and again a day later, the researchers found that the drug caused minimal changes in olfaction. The K305 treatment had a small effect on blood pressure, causing it to rise slightly. Some patients reported nasal congestion, nasal discomfort, throat pain and irritation, headache and eye watering, but no serious adverse events were reported. To follow up on the study, Hersh said the company will likely pursue additional investigations to see if more intensive dental procedures can be performed using this anesthetic, such as root canals or oral tissue biopsies. It’s likely that further studies will also evaluate whether the drug can be safely administered to children. Currently the FDA has approved the drug for use only in individuals weighing at least 40 kilograms, roughly 88 pounds. “It would certainly make for a more stress-free dental office visit for children as well as adults if we could replace some of these anesthetic injections with a simple spray,” Hersh said. “It may also keep some children out of the operating room, which would be a major cost savings to the child’s family and reduce potential morbidity associated with general anesthetic procedures.”


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Researchers have found another potential medical use for botulinum toxin, commercially known as Botox, when they injected the drug into the inflamed salivary glands of a patient suffering from Sjögren’s Syndrome, an autoimmune disorder affecting nearly 4 million Americans. Published in the December issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the case study focuses on a 65-year-old woman who had been suffering for 10 years with weekly bouts of parotitis – inflammation of the major salivary glands located on either side of the face – associated with her 30-year history of Sjögren’s Syndrome. Her successful treatments led the authors to conclude in the official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) that Botox is a “safe and effective alternative to surgical management of recurrent parotitis” resulting from Sjögren’s Syndrome. The patient’s parotitis flare-ups had been requiring regular antibiotic therapy and caused pain, swelling and tenderness. The authors at the University of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia, said current conservative treatments for parotitis typically include a combination of antibiotics, drugs that promotes the secretion of saliva, anti-inflammatories, steroids, warm compresses and massaging – or “milking” – the salivary glands. The physicians decided to offer their patient botulinum toxin injections on the “theoretical basis that reducing saliva production may reduce the likelihood of saliva accumulation and subsequent parotitis.” Botox is being used to reduce saliva production in patients suffering from other disorders, they said. The patient had injections initially every three months and then at four-month intervals. At the 36-month mark, the authors reported that she has no signs or symptoms of parotitis, “remarkably” has not needed a course of antibiotics since her second injection and has not reported any complications or side effects from the treatments. Patients with Sjögren’s Syndrome produce immune cells that may infiltrate their salivary glands and destroy or dilute the ducts that produce saliva. That accumulation of saliva can lead to chronic gland infections and result in a limited production of saliva. If nonsurgical options are not effective, surgery to remove the salivary gland – called a parotidectomy – may be performed. “Botulinum Toxin for the Management of Sjögren Syndrome-Associated Recurrent Parotitis,” is authored by Luke M. O’Neil, MBBS, Carsten E. Palme, MBBS, Faruque Riffat, MBBS, and Neil Mahant, MBBS, Ph.D. The full article can be accessed at http://www.joms.org/article/S0278-2391(16)30487-6/fulltext. ________________ The Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is published by the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons to present to the dental and medical communities comprehensive coverage of new techniques, important developments and innovative ideas in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Practice-applicable articles help develop the methods used to handle dentoalveolar surgery, facial injuries and deformities, TMJ disorders, oral and head and neck cancer, jaw reconstruction, anesthesia and analgesia. The journal also includes specifics on new instruments and diagnostic equipment, and modern therapeutic drugs and devices.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Intense and regular physiotherapy – including exercises and special equipment to temporarily keep the jaw open – is critical to the recovery of pediatric patients who suffer complications from maxillofacial trauma, according to a new scientific study. The study’s recommended treatment plan can help young patients who suffer from post-traumatic restricted mouth openings prevent permanent disabilities, including future TMJ-related disorders, jaw growth problems, functional issues, and the development of chronic pain and joint stiffness. The study was published in the December issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery – the official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS). Working with 86 patients ages 3 to 17 who had suffered mandibular (jawbone) or midface fractures or trauma, the researchers found those who followed a regular program of exercises and used mouth props to keep their jaw open for an hour several times a day recovered more quickly and completely than those who were not provided such treatment. To ensure patient cooperation, especially for children younger than 12, researchers stressed that treatments be performed under the close supervision of their surgeons. In addition, parents were motivated to ensure compliance after being informed of the permanent disabilities the treatment could prevent by maintaining muscle function while preventing adhesion (internal scar tissue) formation and contraction of soft tissues. In addition to difficulties with patient cooperation, researchers said children create special challenges for maxillofacial surgeons because their facial skeletons differ significantly from those of adults. These differences include the small bone and sinus size, growth potential, a quicker healing process and a high incidence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) issues. Patients who followed the study’s recommended treatment plan returned to their preoperative mouth opening size at the fourth month, with fixed normal measurements at the sixth month. The study results led researchers to conclude that a vigorous physiotherapy treatment plan is critical in the recovery of restricted mouth openings and prevention of bone stiffness for pediatric trauma patients. “Physiotherapy Maneuver Is Critical to Recover Mouth Opening After Pediatric Trauma” is authored by Ghada Amin Khalifa, M.D., Naglaa Shawki El-Kilani, M.D., and Hanan Mohamed Shokier, M.D. The full article can be accessed at http://www.joms.org/article/S0278-2391(16)30649-8/fulltext. ____________ The Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is published by the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons to present to the dental and medical communities comprehensive coverage of new techniques, important developments and innovative ideas in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Practice-applicable articles help develop the methods used to handle dentoalveolar surgery, facial injuries and deformities, TMJ disorders, oral and head and neck cancer, jaw reconstruction, anesthesia and analgesia. The journal also includes specifics on new instruments and diagnostic equipment, and modern therapeutic drugs and devices.

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