Seattle, WA, United States
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The present invention provides topical ophthalmic formulations comprising a combination of one or more antihistamine agents and optionally one or more vasculature modifying agents such as a adrenergic receptor antagonist. Also provided are methods of using the formulations of the invention for treating and/or preventing symptoms associated with migraine headache, and for reducing the frequency, severity and duration of migraine attacks.


Gomes P.J.,ORA Inc
Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology | Year: 2014

Purpose of review: This review describes recent findings and trends in prevalence and treatment of allergic ocular diseases. Although the major focus is on seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis, related disorders will also be considered. Recent findings: Published reports from countries around the world suggest that the spectrum of atopic diseases, including seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis, is continuing its pattern of increasing prevalence, which has been well documented over the past few decades. In addition, although treatment modalities have focused on topical formulations including antihistamines and corticosteroids, there is a significant emphasis on immunotherapy as an alternative treatment modality, particularly in the USA. Summary: Allergic conjunctivitis is a key component in the spectrum of allergic diseases that is sometimes collectively referred to as rhinoconjunctivitis. Because of its high prevalence worldwide, it exacts an increasing toll in terms of patient discomfort, morbidity, and loss of productivity. Current estimates suggest that at least 20% of the overall population suffers from some form of allergic conjunctivitis, many without ever seeking treatments. In addition, a significant proportion of patients experience chronic forms of allergy that are less responsive to existing therapies. Recent approval of immunotherapy-based treatments may address this therapeutic gap. © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Patent
ORA Inc | Date: 2011-08-15

This is directed to systems, processes, machines, and other means that simulate blast waves from explosive events. The invention can make waveforms tailored to a users preference to accurately model a variety of explosive events by utilizing a driver section and a transition section that have divergent geometries.


Patent
ORA Inc | Date: 2015-09-29

Disclosed herein are systems, methods, and machine readable media for visualizing complex data, including real-time data streams from wearable device sensors, using a halo-based representation. Halos are comprised of multiple rings that can be used to efficiently convey, for example, information about the status of a subject, such as a subjects heart rate, activity level, and calories burned at particular times throughout a day.


The present invention provides topical ophthalmic formulations comprising a combination of one or more antihistamine agents and optionally one or more vasculature modifying agents such as a adrenergic receptor antagonist. Also provided are methods of using the formulations of the invention for treating and/or preventing symptoms associated with migraine headache, and for reducing the frequency, severity and duration of migraine attacks.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

MONTVALE, NJ--(Marketwired - February 08, 2017) - SRS Health, a leading provider of data-based HCIT solutions for high-performance specialty practices, today proudly announces their partnership with ORA Orthopedics, a 43 provider group with locations in Illinois and Iowa. ORA Orthopedics is the most recent addition to SRS Health's growing roster of nationally respected orthopedic clients. The relationship originated through The OrthoForum, whose membership includes many of the largest privately owned orthopedic practices in the United States. SRS Health has a prominent client presence at The OrthoForum and attends all meetings. The SRS team collaborated very closely with ORA Orthopedics to address their workflow requirements and develop sophisticated new patient-tracking and tasking capabilities that improve operational efficiencies. Partnering with clients is integral to the way SRS develops solutions. The result: powerful tools that enhance workflow, reduce costs, and help improve outcomes. "Many factors went into choosing SRS Health as our HCIT partner, including their willingness to collaborate with us to create unique capabilities, that made SRS the best solution for our practice," said Ken Brockman, CEO at ORA. "Add to that their extremely flexible workflows and market leadership in orthopedics, and the choice was clear." "We are honored to welcome ORA Orthopedics into the SRS family," said Scott Ciccarelli, CEO, SRS Health. "Our collaboration with clients like ORA Orthopedics makes us able to help orthopedic practices by offering tools like Smart Workflows™ and Flexible Data Platform that facilitate the collection of discrete data based on provider and user preferences. That's a unique offering in the orthopedic space -- and one that we think is absolutely critical for practice health today and in the future." To learn more about SRS Health and how it can help your orthopedic practice, visit srs-health.com. As a leading provider of data-based HCIT solutions for high-performance orthopedic and other specialty practices, SRS Health is advancing healthcare by creating frictionless technologies that enhance quality and efficiency, while positioning practices for success in a value-based-payment world. With 20 years of innovation experience, unparalleled implementation success, extensive industry and regulatory expertise, and top-rated US-based customer service and support, it is no wonder that SRS Health has earned top KLAS and Black Book ratings from its clients. To see why SRS Health is the trusted partner of so many prominent orthopedic practices, and to find out how they can prepare you for the future, visit the company's testimonials page, read their blog, e-mail info@srs-health.com, or call 800.288.8369. ORA Orthopedics is the Quad Cities' largest and most comprehensive orthopedic provider, with 27 expert orthopedists who are subspecialty-trained in spine, shoulder and elbow, hand and wrist, hip, knee, and foot and ankle. Their wide array of services includes sports medicine, total joint replacement and revision, general orthopedics, pediatric orthopedics, orthopedic trauma, and adult reconstruction. They proudly serve as the team physicians for local sports teams, colleges, and schools.


News Article | May 1, 2014
Site: techcrunch.com

Stamos Venios, Managing Partner of Data Elite says his company had a vision when they conceived of Data Elite, a lab of sorts, providing a support system for people with ideas for big data companies. This week, the first seven participants are moving onto the next stage. Venios said from the beginning they conceived of a place to provide more intensive support than startups normally get from a VC. And they wanted to be different from the classic incubator. The idea was to bring in really smart people with mature ideas who needed more than money to transform their visions into a viable business that solves real big data problems. As Venios pointed out, Silicon Valley is awash in venture capital cash, but in his view, “the early stage model is broken.” It’s not just about getting cash for him, it’s about providing a true support system for companies to build, test and refine their concepts. “What is important isn’t money, but support,” he told me. Shivnath Babu of Duke University, who is a co-founder of one of the graduating companies, Unravel, said as academics, they have access to business advice and even funding, but what Data Labs gave them was access to experts at the biggest companies like Facebook and Netflix, people who are working with Big Data on a daily basis and have an acute understanding of what products should do and not do. Unravel describes itself as “an enterprise-grade operations and performance management platform. People immersed in Big Data have a unique perspective on what their needs are and they can tell people like Babu that their product solves a pain point or it doesn’t. Having that kind of feedback proved invaluable to Babu and his co-founder Kunal Agarwal and they were able to adjust the product so that when they go to market, they can have greater assurance they are delivering a product customers want and need. It’s precisely this level of help that Venios said he and his co-founders, which include The Social+Capital Partnership, Andreessen-Horowitz, Ron Conway, Formation 8 and Anand Rajaraman envisioned when they launched this project. They have also assembled a who’s who of advisors including Amazon, Facebook, LinkedIn and Netflix to work with their clients. Venios said they were extremely choosy when selecting this first group, starting with 200 applications, narrowing it down to around 80 and eventually choosing these seven companies, graduating this week. IMAGE BY FLICKR USER DAVE HERHOLTZ. USED UNDER CC BY-SA 2.0


News Article | May 1, 2014
Site: venturebeat.com

Now we have a sense of what sorts of startups new big data venture firm Data Elite considers elite. The San Francisco firm, which invests between $150,000 and $1 million and provides office space and advice from data luminaries like Facebook analytics chief Ken Rudin, revealed the seven startups in its inaugural three-month class today. After coming up with a shortlist from more than 200 applications, Data Elite had its advisors rank startups based on product, team, and market, managing partner Stamos Venios told VentureBeat. Startups with considerable data talent came out on top — sort of like the Navy Seals of big data startups. One startup includes the former chief technology officer of Zynga’s systems engineering group. Another comes from a cofounder of venture-backed fundraising site Rally.org. Still another includes the first employee from analytics company Ayasdi. Data Elite is one of several VC firms that have made clear commitments to the big data market. Data Collective and IA Ventures come to mind, as does Accel Partners, which has a big data fund. Data Collective’s Matt Ocko and Accel’s Jake Flomenberg will both be on hand at our DataBeat conference in San Francisco on May 19-20, where we’ll be highlighting several big data startups and talking about how data can help companies increase revenue and decrease costs. Perhaps some of the first Data Elite startups will end up providing those sorts of advantages. In any case, here is the first batch:


SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - May 1, 2014) - Today, Data Elite, Silicon Valley's first venture lab for big data startups, is announcing its first of class of participants. These companies are nearing the completion of the three month program and are developing into must have solutions for the enterprise. Big Data continues to disrupt all industries and verticals, and these companies are creating products that will transform the way business is conducted in every sector. Data Elite is backed by prestigious Silicon Valley's entrepreneurs including The Social+Capital Partnership, Andreessen-Horowitz, Ron Conway, Formation 8 and Anand Rajaraman. The entity has also recruited a board of advisors that include top data scientists from Amazon, Facebook, LinkedIn and Netflix. The venture lab operates as part fund, and part early stage accelerator with a laser focus on finding the best entrepreneurs that were looking for something more than a traditional incubator. Data Elite selected only seven companies for their first class, from over 200 applicants, whom they believed would change the way data is used. They focused on finding elite entrepreneurs with at least one of these criteria: more than five years of experience, a PhD or a previous successful exit. Unlike other funds and incubators Data Elite has formed a board of top Fortune 500 customers to give founders a corporate viewpoint and feedback on their product. This symbiotic relationship has led to beta testing of two portfolio companies by a few large publicly traded technology companies. "Big Data is a large but relatively new space and not everyone understands it well. Traditional incubators didn't have the advice and expertise we needed to be able to grow our solution," say professor Shivnath Babu of Duke University and Kunal Agarwal, Co-Founders of Unravel Data. "Data Elite provided us with access to the best advisors, investors and potential customers that helped us determine the best growth path for Unravel." "These companies are poised to lead the next wave of billion dollar big data businesses because they're building solutions that will make every aspect of business smarter by using analytics to improve package delivery, SEO and social media," says Stamos Venios, Managing Partner of Data Elite. "We've already seen tremendous development with these companies since joining the program and we believe our model sets them up for success because of the guidance they receive from our elite investors, advisors and corporate partners that are unlike any others." For more information about Data Elite, please visit: http://www.dataeliteventures.com/ About Data Elite Data Elite is the Silicon Valley's first venture lab and early-stage fund focused on data sciences. Data Elite was founded by Tasso Argyros, founder of Aster Data which was sold to Teradata for $300M in 2011, as well as Stamos Venios, who has held M&A and investment positions with companies in Europe and Israel. The fund is backed by some of Silicon Valley's most prominent investors such as The Social+Capital Partnership, Andreessen Horowitz, Formation8, Ron Conway, and Anand Rajaraman. Data Elite's six-month program provides top scientists and repeat entrepreneurs with the financial resources, customer network, and technical counsel to build and grow world-class big data businesses.


News Article | April 25, 2015
Site: techcrunch.com

“Did you win your sword fight?” “Of course I won the fucking sword fight,” Hiro says. “I’m the greatest sword fighter in the world.” “And you wrote the software.” “Yeah. That, too,” Hiro says. — Neal Stephenson , Snowcrash If you’re looking for zeitgeist biblical metaphors for the tech sector, you can’t do much better than the Tower of Babel. Human civilization a hundred years after the flood, monolingual and gathered in a city called Babel. They become possessed with the mission of building a tower to the heavens. Which they begin… Until their control-challenged sky God, understanding that humans are capable of anything with one unified language and a will for transcendence, curses them with dialects. (I’m not Christian but am a disciple of narrative.) The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” So the Lord scattered them from there over all the earth, and they stopped building the city. (Genesis 11:6-8) This is God as benevolent systems architect-turned-royalist-hacker, dumping toxic malware onto the human social matrix. And we’re still living in it. Sure, wired humans have been united into a “global village” across shared social platforms in the new millennium. And while we have Twitter and Facebook to thank for the global reach of the Arab Spring, #EricGarner, and the Veronica Mars film project crowdfund, this is not a return to evolutionary Tower-building by an empowered world citizenry. Nor is this technology being developed to unchain us from the holy hack by vanishing linguistic barriers. Quite the opposite. These platforms exist primarily (post-IPO) to service enterprises, institutions and government agencies that place a premium on our written words. In the modern paradigm, companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google are the primary beneficiaries of Babel. After all, it’s the machine-driven analytics of our words and their nuanced sentiments  —  which are used to compartmentalize, analyze and ultimately engineer user behaviors  — that make us the product that they sell to advertisers and other paying customers. In other words, they have a large incentive to maintain the Old Testament status quo because it bestows considerable insight. And power. Last year, a minor outrage erupted when members of Facebook’s Core Data Science Team published the report of a secret study on their users. The study, which manipulated News Feed displays of 700,000 people in order to test the impact of emotions on friend networks, proved that “emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness.” In total, over 3 million posts were analyzed, containing over 122 million words, 4 million of which were positive (3.6 percent) and 1.8 million negative (1.6 percent). The network effect of this contagion was studied, naturally, “via text-based computer-mediated communication” and was limited to English-speaking users. This is all made possible by sentiment analysis: the deployment of algorithms that mine text for meaningful signals about the writer.  Now, as many people pointed out after the initial wave of (media-driven) indignation, sentiment analysis is still in its infancy. It’s neither accurate nor effective in helping artificial intelligence systems to learn and predict human behavior. But it won’t be that way for long. Facebook and Google are leading a new wave of R&D in the field of deep learning, an aspect of AI research, which MIT defines as: “software [that] attempts to mimic the activity in layers of neurons in the neocortex, the wrinkly 80 percent of the brain where thinking occurs. The software learns, in a very real sense, to recognize patterns in digital representations of sounds, images, and other data.” Over the past couple of years, Google has completed acquisitions of a few high-profile deep learning labs, including one run by Geoffrey Hinton who is widely considered, to quote WIRED, the “central figure in the deep learning movement.” Meanwhile, Facebook has created its own AI research lab, led by Yann LeCun, one of Hinton’s former employees, and the guy who taught computers how to read written numbers (early AI tech that is now licensed to banks for ATM check-scanning). Predictably, there’s been a backlash against the corporatization of these computer scientists. But there’s no point in blaming visionary geniuses like LeCun and Hinton. They’re being funded to code-replicate the human brain, which is a powerful enticement. The motivation for Silicon Valley’s C-suiters is less… romantic. Whatever their future aspirations, the foundation of Babel’s corporate revenue structure is still built on an old business model: “delivering relevant, cost-effective online advertising,” to quote a recent Google annual report. And whatever technological advances are made in the AI field will be subsidiary to those which advance the cause of their shareholders: which is profit. At least, if push came to shove. As CEO of the world’s largest social platform, Mark Zuckerberg has one prime directive from his shareholders: Expand your market base. So was it any surprise that the latest PR narrative developed by his Sun Tzu-wielding strategists was to showcase his command of Mandarin to Chinese millennials? In learning an entirely new language to court his company’s largest unpenetrated market, Zuck proved he‘s not only the ultimate citizen of Babel, he’s officially the mayor. But his is a conditional kingdom. To keep the market happy, Zuck has to mine Facebook for every byte of value it has. Which, in the current social network paradigm of text-based programming, means developing the most aggressive artificial intelligence (deep artificial neural nets) and proxy agents to track and tag our behavioral patterns while accurately projecting, and guiding, future impulses. Search and social network data scientists succeed by fragmenting and classifying us as individuals. They are the high priests of demographics and psychographics. But when their algorithms use our language to predict and direct our behavior before we, ourselves, have consciously made those choices, they cross the line into the zone of social engineering. With the accelerated development of computational technology that can process and analyze big data in unprecedented ways, this poses a heavy existential threat to human civilization. Because even if the current social networks have the best intentions for their communities, billions of dollars have been marked against the economies generated by mining and exploiting that data. And any diversion from those objectives would be ruthlessly punished by the market. This isn’t conspiracy theory, it’s market theory 101. The tragic end of this story could well be of a group of brilliant technologists forced into a Faustian deal that ultimately takes the global communication platform once envisioned as evolutionary tech for our species and hacking it for a myopic, profit-driven end-game. In short, like Old Testament gods, their baser instincts could lead them to fuck with the natural order of things. Another civilizational hack. Which brings me back to the Bible. There’s a little-known corollary to the Tower of Babel story. It comes at the other end of the Bible… thousands of years later, in the New Testament. Taking the form of a prophecy: Humankind is again gathered, “all in one place” when suddenly: …there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost, and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance… Now when this was noised abroad, the multitude came together, and were confounded, because that every man heard them speak in his own language. And they were all amazed… (Acts 2: 2-4; 6-7) Sticking with the zeitgeist Biblical-tech metaphor theme, this is a profound narrative arc that suggests the re-congregation of the divided tribes of Babel on a single (technological) platform. One with the potential to return us to our original vision and mission, of building a Tower out of this place: our self-authored extinction algorithm. And companies like Facebook, Google and Twitter may well represent that Tower-building potential. But we have to ask the question: does the DNA of a thing constrain its future iterations and utility? It thrives from, and exists for, those impulses. I have no doubt that Facebook acquired Oculus for the potential it has for humans to assemble virtually, post-linguistically, across space-time. The only question is whether they’ll neutralize its potential by gating it with Facebook Connect and fortressing it into the confines of a system-controlled UX? Because evolution is anarchic. And that’s Orwellian. I don’t have answers to the questions I am musing about here. I do have a lot of ideas about what a platform like Facebook could become if it moved beyond its linguistic limitations and toward a generative object-based system. But I would like to suggest that the Tower of Babel is not a story of our past, but rather one of our future. The divine kibosh that the “creator” put on our transcendent project wasn’t about killing our desire to be gods. It was about seeding the ultimate narrative: a collective hero’s journey to reconnect as a human community despite the extreme trauma of our separation, and those who naturally find themselves in positions that exploit it. Editor’s note: Stephen Marshall is the co-founder and product lead for ORA, a Seattle/London-based start-up innovating in the realm of dimensional data visualization, and portfolio company of the DataElite accelerator.

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