Gaithersburg, MD, United States
Gaithersburg, MD, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Systems, apparatus, and methods are disclosed for generating a resistome profile for a subject, monitoring an infection state of one or more subjects, and/or identifying a potential infection outbreak at a facility, for example, by obtaining first data representative of at least one measure of antibiotic resistance of an organism from a first sample, identifying the organism, determining at least one of an antibiotic susceptibility phenotype, an identity of an antibiotic resistance gene, and an antibiotic to which the organism is non-susceptible, generating and comparing a first pattern to at least one known pattern to determine and generate a profile uniqueness identifier indicating a degree of similarity above a threshold between the first pattern and the at least one known pattern.


GAITHERSBURG, Md., April 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- OpGen, Inc. (NASDAQ:OPGN) today announced that it has presented preliminary results supporting its Acuitas Rapid Test in development to detect antibiotic resistant genes and the use of predictive algorithms from its Acuitas Lighthouse® Knowledgebase to predict antibiotic susceptibility. The results were presented at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Vienna, Austria. The poster, titled “Prediction of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli from resistance genes,” compared phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) with the emerging capabilities of Lighthouse Knowledgebase informatics to predict antibiotic resistance using resistance genes from bacterial isolates. The results of testing over 1,900 E. coli isolates with PCR yielded strong prediction of phenotypic antibiotic resistance for seventeen antibiotics representing seven antibiotic classes with accuracies ranging from 77% to 97%. Resistance for 12 of the antibiotics were predicted with 90% or greater accuracy. A second poster, titled “Rapid outbreak detection of multidrug-resistant organisms using resistance gene profiles,” illustrated the potential to detect hospital pathogen outbreaks by clustering isolates based on resistance gene profiles using a PCR-based test. Outbreak clusters of P. aeruginosa and E. coli were accurately discriminated using multiple resistance genes, thereby demonstrating that a multiplexed PCR-based test has potential to be a rapid, accurate, and efficient method for surveillance of multidrug-resistant organisms. “In the preliminary results presented at ECCMID, our Acuitas technology demonstrated the ability to rapidly and accurately predict antibiotic susceptibility using resistance gene profiles,” said Evan Jones, Chairman and CEO of OpGen. “The development of our first Acuitas Rapid Test to detect resistance genes for interpretation by our Acuitas Lighthouse informatics is underway. The data presented at ECCMID support the potential clinical utility of this exciting new technology.” About OpGen OpGen, Inc. is harnessing the power of informatics and genomic analysis to provide complete solutions for patient, hospital and network-wide infection prevention and treatment. Learn more at www.opgen.com and follow OpGen on Twitter and LinkedIn.


Patent
OpGen | Date: 2015-03-13

The present invention provide methods using genes associated with multi-drug resistance for rapidly detecting a patient colonized or infected with an multi-drug resistant organism and administrating the appropriate precautions and/or treatment.


Patent
OpGen | Date: 2014-03-14

The invention generally relates to optical maps and particularly to computationally tractable methods of assembling large numbers of single molecule maps by dividing the maps into smaller groups of maps within which all of the maps are similar to one another by some metric. For each group, all of the maps are assembled into contigs. The resulting contigs are then assembled into one or more genome assemblies. By dividing the maps into groups, a number of comparison operations required for assembly is reduced and, since each group of maps can be assembled into a contig in a discrete operation, the overall assembly operation can be parallelized.


Patent
OpGen | Date: 2014-03-14

The invention generally relates to sequence assembly and particularly to ordering the alignment of contigs to reference maps. The invention provides systems and methods for assembling contigs by aligning those contigs to a reference map in descending order of placement confidence. Each placement decreases the number of possible placements for the remaining contigs, which otherwise would have been likely to match in numerous places. Contigs are thereby placed along the reference genome with confidence and thus can be assembled into a genome-scale sequence assembly.


Patent
OpGen | Date: 2014-12-08

The present invention generally relates to devices and methods for immobilizing nucleic acids on a substrate. In certain embodiments, devices of the invention include a voltage source, and a substrate coupled to the voltage source, in which hydrophobicity of the substrate changes in response to an applied electric field and a surface of the substrate is coated with a substance that retains nucleic acids.


Systems, methods, and devices are disclosed for improved temperature control, particularly within a predetermined range of temperatures near or above varying ambient temperatures. Previously-unrealized advantages are recognized for maintaining samples, particularly medical and/or biological specimens, at a temperature within a predetermined range of temperatures near or above ambient temperature that selectively promote and/or selectively inhibit organism growth, organism viability, biochemical reactions, and/or chemical reactions. Systems, methods, and devices may include at least phase change material selected and configured to maintain a sample at a predetermined temperature range between about 22 Celsius and about 100 Celsius during a predetermined time period.


Systems, apparatus, and methods are disclosed for generating a resistome profile for a subject, monitoring an infection state of one or more subjects, and/or identifying a potential infection outbreak at a facility, for example, by obtaining first data representative of at least one measure of antibiotic resistance of an organism from a first sample, identifying the organism, determining at least one of an antibiotic susceptibility phenotype, an identity of an antibiotic resistance gene, and an antibiotic to which the organism is non-susceptible, generating and comparing a first pattern to at least one known pattern to determine and generate a profile uniqueness identifier indicating a degree of similarity above a threshold between the first pattern and the at least one known pattern.


The invention generally relates to methods and kits for isolating nucleic acids from an organism. In certain embodiments, methods of the invention involve contacting a plurality of lytic enzymes to an organism, thereby lysing a cell wall of the organism to release the nucleic acid, and introducing at least one agent to separate the nucleic acid from the lysed cells, thereby isolating the nucleic acid.


Patent
OpGen | Date: 2013-08-05

This disclosure features methods of identifying an organism. In certain embodiments, the invention provides methods of distinguishing virulent and non-virulent strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

Loading OpGen collaborators
Loading OpGen collaborators