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Heerlen, Netherlands

Rongen A.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Robroek S.J.W.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | van der Heijden B.I.J.M.,Radboud University Nijmegen | van der Heijden B.I.J.M.,Open University in the Netherlands | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Nursing Management | Year: 2014

Aim: To investigate how work-related characteristics and work ability influence nursing staff decisions to change employer or leave the profession. Background: Previous cross-sectional studies have indicated that decreased work ability and unfavourable work-related characteristics are important determinants for the intention to leave the profession among nursing staff. Methods: A 1-year longitudinal study, using data from the European Nurses' Early Exit Study. The study population consisted of 9927 (66%) members of the eligible nursing staff of which 345 left their current employer. Work-related characteristics, work ability and employment status were assessed by questionnaires. Results: Nursing staff with a low work ability were more likely to either change employer or leave the profession. Among nursing staff with a low work ability the risk of changing employer increased significantly with unfavourable work-related characteristics. However, among nursing staff with a good work ability the risk of changing employer barely changed with unfavourable work-related characteristics. Conclusion: The negative effects of decreased work ability on changing employer and leaving the profession are partly counterbalanced by favourable psychological and physical work-related characteristics. Implications for nursing management: Managers should implement strategies that focus on promoting the work ability of nursing staff in combination with improving work-related characteristics in order to prevent unnecessary changes of employment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Retalis S.,University of Piraeus | Sloep P.B.,Open University in the Netherlands
Journal of Universal Computer Science | Year: 2011

Networked technologies, especially social software applications, provide new affordances that facilitate collaborative creativity among staff members of organizations. This editorial paper gives an overview of the scope of this special issue which focuses on the design of virtual environments for collaborative innovation and learning. © J.UCS.


De Koning B.B.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Tabbers H.K.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Rikers R.M.J.P.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Paas F.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Paas F.,Open University in the Netherlands
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2011

Research has shown that guiding learners' attention in animations by cueing does not necessarily improve conceptual understanding. This study investigated whether the number of elements that are presented per unit of time influences the effectiveness of cueing by showing a cued or an uncued animation about the cardiovascular system at a high or at a low speed. It was hypothesized that cueing would be most helpful for learning when the animation was shown at a high rather than at a low speed. Unexpectedly, students showed equal performances on comprehension and transfer tests irrespective of cueing and the animation's speed. However, the low speed groups invested more mental effort to obtain this performance than the high speed groups. The findings and their implications for the design of animations are discussed in terms of cognitive load theory. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Corbalan G.,Netherlands Institute for Curriculum Development | Kester L.,Open University in the Netherlands | Van Merrienboer J.J.G.,Maastricht University
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2011

Surface task features are more salient than structural task features and thus easier to recognize for novices. It is predicted that the more salient the task features the better learners can choose personally relevant and varied tasks, which enhances learning transfer. To investigate this prediction, a 2 × 2 factorial experiment with 72 participants studied the effects of control over tasks that differ in their surface features (learner, program) and in their structural features (learner, program). Learner control over the selection of tasks with salient surface features enables learners to select personally relevant and varied tasks. This is believed to yield higher effectiveness (i.e., higher near and far transfer test performance) as well as higher efficiency (i.e., higher transfer test performance combined with lower associated mental effort). Learner control over the selection of tasks with non-salient structural features does not enable learners to select personally relevant and varied tasks and is therefore not expected to yield beneficial effects on learning. The results show positive effects of learner control over the selection of tasks with salient surface features for efficiency on the far transfer test but not for effectiveness. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Spanjers I.A.E.,Open University in the Netherlands | Spanjers I.A.E.,Maastricht University | Wouters P.,University Utrecht | Van Gog T.,Open University in the Netherlands | And 3 more authors.
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2011

Many animations impose a high cognitive load due to the transience of information, which often hampers learning. Segmentation, that is presenting animations in pieces (i.e., segments), has been proposed as a means to reduce this high cognitive load. The expertise reversal effect shows, however, that design measures that have a positive effect on cognitive load and learning for students with lower levels of prior knowledge, might not be effective, or might even have a negative effect on cognitive load and learning for students with higher levels of prior knowledge. This experiment with animated worked-out examples showed an expertise reversal effect of segmentation: segmented animations were more efficient than continuous animations (i.e., equal test performance with lower investment of mental effort during learning) for students with lower levels of prior knowledge, but not for students with higher levels of prior knowledge. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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