Rooty Hill, Australia
Rooty Hill, Australia

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Dankwah J.R.,University of New South Wales | Koshy P.,University of New South Wales | O'Kane P.,OneSteel Sydney Mill | Sahajwalla V.,University of New South Wales
Steel Research International | Year: 2012

The reduction of FeO-containing slag by blends of metallurgical coke and end-of-life tyres (RT) have been investigated through experiments conducted in a laboratory-scale horizontal tube furnace. Composite pellets of EAF slag (47.1% FeO) with coke, RT, and blends of coke/RT (in four different proportions) were rapidly heated at 1550°C under high purity argon gas and the off gas was continuously analyzed for CO and CO2using an online infrared (IR) gas analyzer. The extent of reduction after 10min, level of carburization and desulfurization, and the total amount of CO2 emissions were determined for each carbonaceous reductant. The results indicate that the extent of reduction, level of carburization and desulfurization of the reduced metal are significantly improved when coke is blended with RT. Blending of coke with RT resulted in a decrease in direct CO2 emissions from the reduction reactions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Zaharia M.,University of New South Wales | Sahajwalla V.,University of New South Wales | Saha-Chaudhury N.,University of New South Wales | O'Kane P.,OneSteel Sydney Mill | And 3 more authors.
High Temperature Materials and Processes | Year: 2012

End of life tyres are discarded at an alarming rate reflecting the strength of developing countries economy and the intensity of trade and transportation. Conversely, environmental concerns are increasing the need for alternative materials in steelmaking industries. The solution to this problem involves the development of environmentally-friendly technologies that would utilize these waste products. The present study investigates carbon/slag reactions, including slag foaming and FeO reduction, for a range of coke/rubber blends. Off-gas emissions (CO and CO2) were monitored and correlated with dynamic changes in volume as a result of iron oxide rich EAF slag and carbon. The gaseous emissions from metallurgical coke showed lower concentrations in comparison to the emissions from the coke-rubber blends. With an increase of rubber in the blend, gaseous emissions were enhanced. Significant carbon/slag interactions occurred when coke/rubber blends were used, with associated iron oxide reductions within the slag phase. The quantitative estimation of the slag droplet volume was performed by using the Vt/Vo ratio as a measure of slag foaming. These results indicate that partial replacement of coke with rubber is not only viable, but efficient leading to improved interactions with EAF slag.


Dankwah J.R.,University of New South Wales | Koshy P.,University of New South Wales | Saha-Chaudhury N.M.,University of New South Wales | O'Kane P.,OneSteel Sydney Mill | And 3 more authors.
ISIJ International | Year: 2011

In Australia, the use of plastics has increased tremendously over the last few decades, but less than 20% of the waste plastics are recycled. The rest is usually landfilled, which poses major environmental problems. The solution to this problem involves the development of novel environmentally-benign technologies that would utilise these waste materials. This work investigates the reduction of EAF slags (47% FeO) by blends of metallurgical coke with High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) plastics at 1 550°C. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory-scale horizontal tube furnace, and were coupled with off-gas analysis using an infrared gas analyser and a multiple gas chromatographic analyser. The results indicate that the rate of FeO reduction in slags is significantly higher when the coke/plastics blends were used compared to pure coke, with the maximum rate of reduction (Blend 4) being over twice that of coke. Moreover, the CO 2 content in the off-gas was observed to decrease (by ̃75%) with increase in the polymer content of the blend. Additionally, the degree of carburisation and the removal of sulphur from the metal improved considerably when the coke was blended with plastics. The observed improvements in the rates of reduction, carburisation and desulphurisation are attributed to the reactions of hydrogen evolved from the waste plastics at these high temperatures. © 2011 ISIJ.

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