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Midlothian, VA, United States

Lancioni G.,University of Bari | Singh N.,ONE Research Institute | O'Reilly M.,University of Texas at Austin | Signorino M.,Lega ro Research Center | And 3 more authors.
Developmental Neurorehabilitation | Year: 2010

Objective: To adapt an existing computer-assisted program to help a post-coma man with extensive multiple disabilities choose between stimulus events. Method: An adapted version of the program assessed in this study presented the man with 7-second samples of preferred and non-preferred stimuli, without questions, and allowed him to choose any of them through a vocalization response. The man's use of this response to choose a stimulus sample led the computer to present the matching stimulus for 20seconds. The same response used immediately after the end of the 20-second stimulus presentation led to the repetition of that presentation. Results: The adapted program version was effective in promoting high levels of choice among preferred stimuli and virtually no responding in relation to non-preferred stimuli. Indices of happiness were frequent during the program sessions. Conclusions: Computer-assisted programs for stimulus choice might be successfully adapted to post-coma persons with extensive disabilities. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | Singh N.N.,ONE Research Institute | O'Reilly M.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Sigafoos J.,Victoria University of Wellington | Oliva D.,Lega ro Research Center
Clinical Case Studies | Year: 2011

A new verbal-instruction system, which ensured the presentation of step instructions automatically, was used to help a woman with moderate intellectual disability and blindness perform food- and drink-preparation tasks. During Part I of the study, this system was compared with a system requiring the woman to seek instructions on her own. Two tasks were used, one with each system. During Part II of the study, the new system was applied with four additional tasks. The results of Part I showed the following: (a) the woman's level of correct performance on the task carried out with the new system was higher than the level on the other task and (b) performance of this latter task improved when the new system was used with it. The results of Part II showed satisfactory performance with all four tasks carried out with the new system. The implications of these data were discussed. © The Author(s) 2011. Source


Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | O'Reilly M.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Singh N.N.,ONE Research Institute | Oliva D.,Lega ro Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Developmental Neurorehabilitation | Year: 2011

Objective: To assess a computer-aided technology for assisting writing in a man who emerged from a minimally conscious state and presented with extensive motor disabilities. Method: The technology served to present letters, in groups, at the centre of a computer screen and display (write) the letters selected by the man (i.e. through a simplified pointing response) on the upper half of that screen. Results: The results showed that the technology enabled the man to produce clear (readily readable) writing. This writing compared positively with the results obtained using a communication board containing the letters (i.e. a system already available to the man). Conclusion: Computer-aided technology may provide basic writing (communication) opportunities to persons emerged from a minimally conscious state and affected by extensive motor disabilities and lack of speech. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Source


Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | Singh N.N.,ONE Research Institute | O'Reilly M.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Alberti G.,Lega ro Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Developmental Neurorehabilitation | Year: 2011

Objective: Extending the use of microswitch-based programmes to (a) establish mouth-drying responses and reduce the effects of drooling, (b) assess the possibility of widening inter-response intervals and (c) determine whether different microswitch solutions would impact the accuracy/effectiveness of mouth drying. Method: During the intervention phases of the study, the participant (woman) performed mouth-drying responses via a special napkin. Such napkin contained two pressure sensors/microswitches, a microprocessor and an MP3 serving to monitor responses and ensure stimulation contingent on them. Results: The participant (a) learned to dry her mouth and reduce her chin wetness, (b) stabilized her responding at lower frequencies (i.e. when the stimulation period was extended) and (c) produced more accurate/effective responses when she was required to trigger both sensors of the napkin. Conclusion: Microswitch-based programmes may promote practically sustainable and effective mouth drying to reduce drooling effects in persons with multiple disabilities. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved. Source


Lancioni G.E.,University of Bari | Singh N.N.,ONE Research Institute | O'Reilly M.F.,University of Texas at Austin | Sigafoos J.,Victoria University of Wellington | And 6 more authors.
Research in Developmental Disabilities | Year: 2010

These two studies extended previous research on the use of verbal instructions and support technology for helping persons with mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease perform daily activities. Study I included seven participants who were to carry out one of two previously targeted activities (i.e., either coffee preparation or table setting). Study II included four participants who were to carry out two new activities (i.e., preparation of a fruit salad and of a vegetable salad). The effects of activity engagement on mood (i.e., indices of happiness) were assessed by recording the participants' behavior during the activity trials and parallel non-activity periods. The participants of Study I reached percentages of correct activity performance, which normally exceeded 85. Five of them also showed higher indices of happiness during the activity trials as opposed to the non-activity periods. Three of the participants of Study II reached high percentages of correct performance on both activities available. One of these participants also showed higher indices of happiness during the activity trials. The findings were discussed in relation to previous research outcomes and in terms of their practical implications for intervention programs. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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