Oncology Section

Pavia, Italy

Oncology Section

Pavia, Italy

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Fiorina L.,Molecular Virology | Ricotti M.,Oncology Section | Vanoli A.,University of Pavia | Luinetti O.,University of Pavia | And 8 more authors.
Infectious Agents and Cancer | Year: 2014

Background: Environmental factors may play a role in colon cancer. In this view, several studies investigated tumor samples for the presence of various viral DNA with conflicting results. Findings. We undertook a systematic DNA analysis of 44 consecutive, prospectively collected primary tumor samples by real time and qualitative PCR for viruses of known or potential oncogenic role in humans, including polyomavirus (JCV, BKV, Merkel cell polyomavirus), HPV, HTLV, HHV-8 and EBV. Negative controls consisted of surgical resection margins. No evidence of genomic DNA fragments from tested virus were detected, except for EBV, which was found in a significant portion of tumors (23/44, 52%). Real-time PCR showed that EBV DNA was present at a highly variable content (median 258 copies in 105 cells, range 15-4837). Presence of EBV DNA had a trend to be associated with high lymphocyte infiltration (p = 0.06, χ2 test), and in situ hybridization with EBER1-2 probes revealed latency in a fraction of these lymphoid cells, with just a few scattered plasma cells positive for BZLF-1, an immediate early protein expressed during lytic replication. LMP-1 expression was undetectable by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: These results argue against a significant involvement of the tested oncogenic viruses in established colon cancer. © 2014 Fiorina et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Molecular Virology, University of Pavia and Oncology Section
Type: | Journal: Infectious agents and cancer | Year: 2014

Environmental factors may play a role in colon cancer. In this view, several studies investigated tumor samples for the presence of various viral DNA with conflicting results.We undertook a systematic DNA analysis of 44 consecutive, prospectively collected primary tumor samples by real time and qualitative PCR for viruses of known or potential oncogenic role in humans, including polyomavirus (JCV, BKV, Merkel cell polyomavirus), HPV, HTLV, HHV-8 and EBV. Negative controls consisted of surgical resection margins. No evidence of genomic DNA fragments from tested virus were detected, except for EBV, which was found in a significant portion of tumors (23/44, 52%). Real-time PCR showed that EBV DNA was present at a highly variable content (median 258 copies in 10(5) cells, range 15-4837). Presence of EBV DNA had a trend to be associated with high lymphocyte infiltration (p=0.06, 2 test), and in situ hybridization with EBER1-2 probes revealed latency in a fraction of these lymphoid cells, with just a few scattered plasma cells positive for BZLF-1, an immediate early protein expressed during lytic replication. LMP-1 expression was undetectable by immunohistochemistry.These results argue against a significant involvement of the tested oncogenic viruses in established colon cancer.


PubMed | Oncology Section
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biological trace element research | Year: 2013

Since low selenium (Se) levels have been identified in some individuals with colon cancer, we evaluated Se levels as a potential marker for this malignancy in a kindred subject to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, an autosomal dominant disease. Unaffected family members and spouses were selected randomly for testing. Serum Se levels were performed on dialyzed sera using the neutron activation technique. Hair Se assays were determined by a spectrofluorometric method. Family members were classified as having low, intermediate, or high risk for colon cancer based on family history. There was no correlation between serum and hair Se measurements. There was also no significant difference in hair or serum Se levels between any of the groups, suggesting that serum Se levels do not correlate with hereditary risk for colon cancer. Prospective studies are in progress to evaluate tissue Se levels and serial Se measurements in high risk patients to establish whether Se levels change with the development of colon cancer.

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