Oncology Clinic

Warsaw, Poland

Oncology Clinic

Warsaw, Poland

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PubMed | Yeditepe University, Sandton Oncology Center, Maribor Teaching Hospital, King Faisal Specialist Hospital And Research Center and 15 more.
Type: Consensus Development Conference | Journal: Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) | Year: 2014

Bone is the most common site of distant metastases in breast cancer that can cause severe and debilitating skeletal related events (SRE) including hypercalcemia of malignancy, pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression and the need for palliative radiation therapy or surgery to the bone. SRE are associated with substantial pain and morbidity leading to frequent hospitalization, impaired quality of life and poor prognosis. The past 25 years of research on the pathophysiology of bone metastases led to the development of highly effective treatment options to delay or prevent osseous metastases and SRE. Management of bone metastases has become an integral part of cancer treatment requiring expertise of multidisciplinary teams of medical and radiation oncologists, surgeons and radiologists in order to find an optimal treatment for each individual patient. A group of international breast cancer experts attended a Skeletal Care Academy Meeting in November 2012 in Istanbul and discussed current preventive measures and treatment options of SRE, which are summarized in this evidence-based consensus for qualified decision- making in clinical practice.


News Article | December 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The High Reliability Organization Council (HROC) and Sepsis Alliance are joining forces to call for expanded deployment of a U.S. Air Force innovation called Military Acuity Model (MAM) into civilian, Veterans Administration (VA) and Military Health System (MHS) hospitals. MAM is a data-driven early warning system designed to help patients by preventing task saturation within the hospital. The result of a public-private partnership that was awarded the Military Healthy System Innovation Award in 2013, MAM has been shown to reduce incidents of sepsis. Initially proven at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in helping reduce failure to rescue, or preventable deaths, by 87% through process and team changes, the MAM is credited in "force-multiplying" teams toward the treatment of veterans seeking healthcare services. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which is always exploring ways to reduce patient risks and preventable deaths, analyzed hospital discharges between 2000-2010. Over that 10-year span, the top eight deadliest diagnoses all had double-digit declines in inpatient mortality except for one: sepsis. In fact, sepsis actually had a double-digit increase during that same period of time.1 “Sepsis is the tip of the spear, and we’re racing against the clock to raise sepsis awareness and help lower sepsis mortality,” said Thomas Heymann, Executive Director of Sepsis Alliance. “The MAM is a vital tool in combatting sepsis. We believe implementation, particularly in partnerships between public and private health organizations, can lead to higher recognition of sepsis as a medical emergency, which can significantly improve patient safety.” Past studies suggest there is a need to go beyond the four walls of the VA to engage civilian and community partners.2 Passage of the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014, more commonly known as the “Choice Act,” has led to more veterans going to civilian hospitals for treatment, Yet, even with The Choice Act in place, the unacceptably high rate of suicide among veterans suggests that access to care outside the VA system afforded by The Choice Act may not be enough. Sepsis Alliance and HROC are calling for Federal and civilian healthcare providers to partner in implementing MAM, given advantages each organization brings to the partnership. For instance, the Military and VA possess specialized knowledge and techniques that could be paired with the readily-available electronic data provided by civilian providers. Such partnerships could also include developing MAM-based cognitive resource-versus-risk models to lower suicide rates within the veteran community. “Suicide among veterans is a FTR, similar to sepsis, as it is a preventable death where time is of the essence,” added Lieutenant Colonel Jared Mort, an expert in the MAM. “MAM can help identify specific tasks at risk of failure, further upstream, instead of waiting for a patient to become thoroughly at risk at a late stage. This includes earlier interventions addressing more comprehensive quality of life issues that would otherwise create burdens. It is these burdens that can lead to 'moments of vulnerability', or trigger events, which then have deadly consequences for our veterans and active duty servicemembers." In a 2016 brief titled, “Facts About Veteran Suicide,” the VA estimated that sixty-five percent (65%) of veterans who commit suicide are aged 50 or higher who have not taken part in recent combat.3 MAM studies suggest that age may play a large role in these suicides, and that both physical and cognitive declines play significant roles in task saturation, creating moments of vulnerability that leave this retirement-age population more at risk of preventable death. “This is because task saturation may impair an individual's ability to overcome challenges they face,” added Lt. Col. Mort, “which can lead to two of the most significant interpersonal risk factors -- feelings of burdensomeness and hopelessness -- not frequently verbalized prior to veteran suicide.”4 In addition to task saturation, PSS may also contribute to higher suicide rates. A 2010 study published in the Journal of American Medical Association showed that PSS can increase cognitive impairment and cloud judgment, which also increases moments of vulnerability that can lead to suicide. Attacking the underlying incidents of sepsis will eliminate PSS, reducing the likelihood of these moments of vulnerability from happening in the first place. “Without question, MAM can have a positive impact on our veterans and servicemembers, even before they begin experiencing such personal and emotional anguish,” added Lt. Col. Mort. “Based on MAM's reductions in similar preventable patient safety issues studied, HROC estimates that implementation of MAM can help reduce suicide rates by 30%, a factor which is incredibly significant.” Cancer mortality may also benefit through greater adoption of MAM. Expansion of application of the MAM to monitor veterans fighting cancer, given their high frequency of VA or civilian hospital stays, while reducing other risks, can help hospitals lower preventable deaths in the veteran community. Studies conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), as well as the VA, showed that exposure to carcinogens, such as herbicides during the Vietnam War and contaminants from oil-well fires during the Persian Gulf War, left veterans with significantly higher rates of certain types of cancer than the general population.5,6,7 One NIH study published in 2004 revealed that cancer patients are at almost 4 times greater risk8 to be hospitalized with severe sepsis -- which has at least a 28% mortality rate9 -- than the general population, with factors such as age, weakened immune systems, and emerging antibiotic-resistant bacteria contributing to these staggering numbers. Initial research on the MAM focused on its application in treating cancer patients. Dr. Shereef Elnahal, a radiation oncologist and physician expert who has researched MAM extensively, has published two peer-reviewed articles on MAM’s implementation at Johns Hopkins and Wright-Patterson AFB. In these articles, he revealed that his goal was to help diagnose and treat more cancer patients quickly, yet safely, using the MAM methodology. Elnahal noted that during his Hopkins study, “The busiest clinic days [average] increased from 5.3 patients per day to 10 per day during implementation, a 1.9-fold increase." 10,11 “Dr. Elnahal's implementation of MAM led to higher 'safe throughput' -- the clinic’s team could manage more patients at a higher level of safety, and without adding to staff headcount,” explained Terry Rajasenan, co-inventor of MAM who sits on the Executive Board of HROC. “In preventing task saturation, select team members became more reliable. The same team was then seeing essentially twice as many patients -- yet still safely. This was surprising at first glance, but quite logical once it was fully understood by our research. The end result is that better screenings and preventions, whether for sepsis, cancer deaths, or suicides, are possible for more patients – without the need to add staff or overwhelm existing staff with more and more work." Organizations interested in learning how to reduce task saturation, and the circumstances where MAM techniques can help, are encouraged to visit HROC at: http://www.thinkhro.org And for more information on reducing sepsis, please visit Sepsis Alliance at: HROC (http://www.thinkhro.org/) is a registered non-profit committed to scientific study and public safety, and serves as a platform for education and collaboration, supporting and assisting in the implementation of High Reliability Organizations (HRO) in healthcare, government, and nonprofit entities. It arose from over 2 years of pro bono work by ProcessProxy Corp. with the U.S. Air Force in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. HROC members are clinicians, researchers, veterans, and HRO practitioners on the frontline of educating the public on the need for healthcare to adopt HRO principles in the interest of significantly improving both patient and public safety. Sepsis Alliance is the nation’s leading sepsis advocacy organization, dedicated to saving lives by raising awareness of sepsis as a medical emergency. A 501(c)(3) organization, Sepsis Alliance was founded by Dr. Carl Flatley after the sudden, unnecessary death of his daughter Erin to a disease he had never even heard of. Sepsis Alliance produces and distributes educational materials for patients, families and health providers on sepsis prevention, early recognition and treatment. The organization also offers support to patients, sepsis survivors, and family members through its sepsis.org website which receives more than 1 million visits each year. The organization founded Sepsis Awareness Month in 2011, and works with partners to host community outreach events across North America. Since Sepsis Alliance began its mission, sepsis awareness has increased almost threefold, from 19% to 55%. For more information on Sepsis Alliance, a GuideStar Gold-rated charity, please visit http://www.sepsis.org/. 1 https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db118.pdf (CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2000-2010) 2 http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2016/11/10/are-public-private-partnerships-the-future-of-serving-veterans/) 3 http://www.dcoe.mil/Content/Navigation/Documents/SPC2012/2012SPC-Kronick-facts_about_veteran_suicide.pdf; https://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/Suicide_Prevention_FactSheet_New_VA_Stats_070616_1400.pdf 4 Kumar, Updesh. "The Wiley Handbook of Personality Assessment"; http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1119173442.html 5 http://www.research.va.gov/topics/vietnam.cfm 6 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2780333/ 7 http://www.cancer.net/blog/2014-11/cancer-and-gulf-war-veterans 8 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1065011/ 9 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1065011/ ; Angus DC, Linde-Zwirble WT, Lidicker J, Clermont G, Carcillo J, Pinsky MR, Epidemiology of severe sepsis in the United States: analysis of incidence, outcome, and associated costs of care https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11445675 Crit Care Med 2001;29(7):1303–1310 10 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1062860615613581 11 Improving Safe Patient Throughput In A Multi-Disciplinary Oncology Clinic, physicianleaders.org March/April 2015; http://bit.ly/2hL6kMh


Biganzoli L.,Prato Hospital | Di Vincenzo E.,Prato Hospital | Jiang Z.,307 Hospital | Lichinitser M.,Modality | And 15 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2012

Background: There are limited data on treatment outcomes in the growing population of elderly patients with locally recurrent/metastatic breast cancer (LR/mBC). To gain information on first-line bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy in the elderly, we analyzed data from the ATHENA trial in routine oncology practice. Patients and methods: Patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative LR/mBC received firstline bevacizumab with standard chemotherapy until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or physician/patient decision. We carried out a subgroup analysis of safety and efficacy in patients aged ≥70 years. Possible correlations between tolerability and baseline comorbidities or Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status were explored. Results: Bevacizumab was combined with single-agent paclitaxel in 46% of older patients. Only hypertension and proteinuria were more common in older than in younger patients (grade ≥3 hypertension: 6.9% versus 4.2%, respectively; grade ≥3 proteinuria: 4.0% versus 1.5%, respectively). Grade ≥3 arterial/venous thromboembolism occurred in 2.9% versus 3.3%, respectively. Further analysis revealed no relationship between baseline presence and severity of hypertension and risk of developing hypertension during bevacizumab-containing therapy. Median time to progression was 10.4 months in patients aged ≥70 years. Conclusions: These findings suggest that bevacizumab-containing therapy is tolerable and active in patients aged ≥70 years. Hypertension was more common than in younger patients but was manageable. We find no evidence precluding the use of bevacizumab in older patients, including those with hypertension, although age may influence chemotherapy choice. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, Dec. 08, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Julie Hammon, Oncology Nurse Navigator at Oaklawn Hospital in Michigan, has been selected to join the Nursing Board at the American Health Council. She will be sharing her knowledge and expertise in Hematology, Oncology, Education, Leadership, Clinical Research, Nursing, Patient Care, and Healthcare Finance. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/7a711427-e8e0-41b4-bc81-12bc7e1d6a34. Ms. Hammon has been a practicing registered nurse for the past 25 years. Her nursing career started with an associates degree in 1991, a bachelor's from Michigan State in 2000 and her master's from the University of Michigan in 2008. Her first nursing venture was as a Medical Surgical Nurse. In 1994, her supervisor at the time approached her about venturing into the field of chemotherapy. Today she is one of four Oncology Certified Nurses at Oaklawn. Oaklawn Hospital is an independently owned non-profit hospital with a reputation for providing compassionate, personal care. It has been a “Magnet” hospital for the last 8 years. Ms. Hammon is committed to providing her patients the best evidence-based care available. Her day-to-day responsibilities as Oncology Nurse Navigator include educating patients and families about Oncology. This consists of teaching them about survivorship, drug side effects, and reoccurrence. She is also responsible for signing patients up for various foundations and low-cost drug programs and keeping her staff up-to-date on best practices in the field of Oncology. Ms. Hammon attributes her strong work ethic to being positive about what she does and always exchanging her information to others. No matter what, she always keeps trying and makes sure to have a plan A, B, and C. Of all her accomplishments, Ms. Hammon is most proud of being able to make a difference in the lives of her patients and having patients who say “thank you” for always helping them in their time of need. She was awarded an Oncology Nursing Society scholarship to attend the ONS Research Conference in 2013. Her long-term goals include continuing to grow the Oncology Clinic and always having the best resources available to help her patients. Ms. Hammon is affiliated with the Oncology Nursing Society, Michigan Cancer Consortium, and 5Cs (Calhoun County Cancer Control Coalition). She is an Adjunct Professor for Baker College of Jackson, MI, and contributes to the American Cancer Society. Ms. Hammon is a proud mother of three and grandmother of six. She enjoys quilting and scrapbooking in her free time.


New Partnership with Behavioral Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) Company QOLPOM for a New Service to Benefit Patients SANTA MONICA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / November 10, 2016 / Parallax Health Sciences, Inc. ("Parallax" or the "Company") (PRLX), is pleased to announce that GRANDE RONDE HOSPITAL, INC. a state and nationally recognized, award winning, not-for-profit health system that includes a 25-bed Critical Access Hospital and 10 outpatient clinics located in Union County, Oregon, has selected QOLPOM, INC. as its provider of Remote Patient Monitoring Services. Grande Ronde serves a base population of more than 25,000 residents and has provided healthcare services for the greater eastern Oregon region since 1907. "This newest expansion of GRH TeleHealth services through our Patient-Centered Primary Care Program offers increased diversity and opportunity for providing in-home care to some of our most vulnerable patients. Our partnership with QOLPOM provides us with a great opportunity to offer even more healing and comfort for those patients who are being treated at home. They will continue to receive quality care from friendly faces with even greater support through a thriving specialty-consult technology network," said Doug Romer, GRH Executive Director of Patient Care Services. QOLPOM, a subsidiary of Parallax Health Sciences, Inc. of Santa Monica, CA, provides technology for comprehensive, next generation telehealth delivery and services. The QOLPOM Hub, a leader in secure Remote Patient Monitoring software, provides remote monitoring of patients requiring in-home and timely monitoring for a variety of medical conditions. The Hub can also provide a medication-dispensing device that will help assure patient compliance with prescription drug regimens. Synergistic with this QOLPOM Hub feature, Parallax and QOLPOM can provide prescription medications through its pharmacy division, Roxsan Pharmacy, based in Beverly Hills, CA (www.roxsan.com). Providing convenience for patients and cost reductions for the hospital are the measurable outcomes targeted by the program. The QOLPOM brand is an acronym for Quality of Life–Peace of Mind. QOLPOM services are directed at sustaining and improving the quality of life for individuals experiencing either transitory or long-term medical conditions. Knowing that help is always near gives peace of mind to patients and their loved ones, providing the confidence in care is professionally and continuously monitored. "Hospitals are breaking-out of their traditional four walls and providing care where and when patients need it," said Rick Pollack, President and CEO of the AHA. "These hospitals exemplify this transformation by harnessing technology, engaging patients and offering services remotely. Removing policy and other barriers to telehealth will allow even faster adoption of these amazing technologies." QOLPOM President Nathaniel Bradley concurs with Pollack's assessment, adding that QOLPOM is eager to partner with telehealth leader Grande Ronde Hospital to develop and refine the delivery of remote medical monitoring services to the community of Union County. "This partnership is indicative of Grande Ronde Hospital's continued commitment to innovate and build on new, dynamic patient interactions. QOLPOM offers the most complete, cost effective, evidence based and flexible remote health solutions in the market place today. Applying technology to assist individuals in their day-to-day functions is not a new concept. The key is to tailor services to meet the unique needs of individual clients and their families, that is, to wade through the confusing maize of services and find or create what works best for each individual and those who are caring for their loved one," says Bradley. QOLPOM's services are predicated on delivering the most state of the art, up to date tele- monitoring programs, devices and applications. The key is to customize services to meet the unique needs of individual clients and their families, that is, to wade through the confusing maize of services and find or create what works best. We are building software, technology and support infrastructure for the coming home healthcare revolution. We have access to the highest quality products and customizable monitoring operations that deliver quality of life for our users and peace of mind for those who care for and about them. QOLPOM operates out of Tucson, Arizona and its monitoring center is located in Tempe, Arizona. Please visit www.qolpom.com for more information. Parallax Health Sciences, Inc., with offices in Santa Monica, CA, is a fully reporting Nevada corporation (PRLX). Parallax is focused on personalized patient healthcare with its Pharmacy and Infertility business through its Beverly Hills, California based RoxSan Pharmacy and RoxSan Fertility Group operations and Parallax Diagnostics. Parallax Diagnostics has rights to a line of point of care diagnostic tests on a single proprietary platform, and plans to develop a novel, handheld diagnostic testing system that is simple, rapid and elegant, offering the potential to transform the diagnostic landscape by transitioning critical tests from the centralized lab directly to the hands of the physician, care givers or home use. www.parallaxhealthsciences.com and www.roxsan.com and www.roxsanfertility.com Grande Ronde Hospital, INC. is a state and nationally recognized and award winning not-for-profit health system that includes a 25-bed Critical Access Hospital and 10 outpatient clinics. We are located in Union County, Oregon, serving our base population of more than 25,000 residents, as well as providing services for the greater eastern Oregon region. Since 1907, Grande Ronde Hospital has led this region in efforts to stabilize and secure rural health care services for the communities we serve, while also working to improve the quality of life of all our residents. Today we employ more than 700 people, all dedicated to providing quality health care services to our patients. We offer a broad range of diagnostic, surgical and therapeutic outpatient services, a Level IV Trauma Emergency Services Department, a Family Birthing Center; Physical, Occupational and Speech Rehabilitation Therapy Services, and Home Care Services providing both home health and hospice care needs. We also operate 10 primary and specialty care clinics: the Cardiology Clinic, the Elgin Clinic, the Hematology & Oncology Clinic, the Neurology Clinic, the Regional Medical Clinic, the Sleep Clinic, the Specialty Clinic (General Surgery, Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Otolaryngology (ENT), Urology, and Wound Ostomy Care), the Walk-In Clinic, the Union Clinic, and the Women's & Children's Clinic (Gynecology, Obstetrics and Pediatrics). For more information, visit www.grh.org. New Partnership with Behavioral Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) Company QOLPOM for a New Service to Benefit Patients SANTA MONICA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / November 10, 2016 / Parallax Health Sciences, Inc. ("Parallax" or the "Company") (PRLX), is pleased to announce that GRANDE RONDE HOSPITAL, INC. a state and nationally recognized, award winning, not-for-profit health system that includes a 25-bed Critical Access Hospital and 10 outpatient clinics located in Union County, Oregon, has selected QOLPOM, INC. as its provider of Remote Patient Monitoring Services. Grande Ronde serves a base population of more than 25,000 residents and has provided healthcare services for the greater eastern Oregon region since 1907. "This newest expansion of GRH TeleHealth services through our Patient-Centered Primary Care Program offers increased diversity and opportunity for providing in-home care to some of our most vulnerable patients. Our partnership with QOLPOM provides us with a great opportunity to offer even more healing and comfort for those patients who are being treated at home. They will continue to receive quality care from friendly faces with even greater support through a thriving specialty-consult technology network," said Doug Romer, GRH Executive Director of Patient Care Services. QOLPOM, a subsidiary of Parallax Health Sciences, Inc. of Santa Monica, CA, provides technology for comprehensive, next generation telehealth delivery and services. The QOLPOM Hub, a leader in secure Remote Patient Monitoring software, provides remote monitoring of patients requiring in-home and timely monitoring for a variety of medical conditions. The Hub can also provide a medication-dispensing device that will help assure patient compliance with prescription drug regimens. Synergistic with this QOLPOM Hub feature, Parallax and QOLPOM can provide prescription medications through its pharmacy division, Roxsan Pharmacy, based in Beverly Hills, CA (www.roxsan.com). Providing convenience for patients and cost reductions for the hospital are the measurable outcomes targeted by the program. The QOLPOM brand is an acronym for Quality of Life–Peace of Mind. QOLPOM services are directed at sustaining and improving the quality of life for individuals experiencing either transitory or long-term medical conditions. Knowing that help is always near gives peace of mind to patients and their loved ones, providing the confidence in care is professionally and continuously monitored. "Hospitals are breaking-out of their traditional four walls and providing care where and when patients need it," said Rick Pollack, President and CEO of the AHA. "These hospitals exemplify this transformation by harnessing technology, engaging patients and offering services remotely. Removing policy and other barriers to telehealth will allow even faster adoption of these amazing technologies." QOLPOM President Nathaniel Bradley concurs with Pollack's assessment, adding that QOLPOM is eager to partner with telehealth leader Grande Ronde Hospital to develop and refine the delivery of remote medical monitoring services to the community of Union County. "This partnership is indicative of Grande Ronde Hospital's continued commitment to innovate and build on new, dynamic patient interactions. QOLPOM offers the most complete, cost effective, evidence based and flexible remote health solutions in the market place today. Applying technology to assist individuals in their day-to-day functions is not a new concept. The key is to tailor services to meet the unique needs of individual clients and their families, that is, to wade through the confusing maize of services and find or create what works best for each individual and those who are caring for their loved one," says Bradley. QOLPOM's services are predicated on delivering the most state of the art, up to date tele- monitoring programs, devices and applications. The key is to customize services to meet the unique needs of individual clients and their families, that is, to wade through the confusing maize of services and find or create what works best. We are building software, technology and support infrastructure for the coming home healthcare revolution. We have access to the highest quality products and customizable monitoring operations that deliver quality of life for our users and peace of mind for those who care for and about them. QOLPOM operates out of Tucson, Arizona and its monitoring center is located in Tempe, Arizona. Please visit www.qolpom.com for more information. Parallax Health Sciences, Inc., with offices in Santa Monica, CA, is a fully reporting Nevada corporation (PRLX). Parallax is focused on personalized patient healthcare with its Pharmacy and Infertility business through its Beverly Hills, California based RoxSan Pharmacy and RoxSan Fertility Group operations and Parallax Diagnostics. Parallax Diagnostics has rights to a line of point of care diagnostic tests on a single proprietary platform, and plans to develop a novel, handheld diagnostic testing system that is simple, rapid and elegant, offering the potential to transform the diagnostic landscape by transitioning critical tests from the centralized lab directly to the hands of the physician, care givers or home use. www.parallaxhealthsciences.com and www.roxsan.com and www.roxsanfertility.com Grande Ronde Hospital, INC. is a state and nationally recognized and award winning not-for-profit health system that includes a 25-bed Critical Access Hospital and 10 outpatient clinics. We are located in Union County, Oregon, serving our base population of more than 25,000 residents, as well as providing services for the greater eastern Oregon region. Since 1907, Grande Ronde Hospital has led this region in efforts to stabilize and secure rural health care services for the communities we serve, while also working to improve the quality of life of all our residents. Today we employ more than 700 people, all dedicated to providing quality health care services to our patients. We offer a broad range of diagnostic, surgical and therapeutic outpatient services, a Level IV Trauma Emergency Services Department, a Family Birthing Center; Physical, Occupational and Speech Rehabilitation Therapy Services, and Home Care Services providing both home health and hospice care needs. We also operate 10 primary and specialty care clinics: the Cardiology Clinic, the Elgin Clinic, the Hematology & Oncology Clinic, the Neurology Clinic, the Regional Medical Clinic, the Sleep Clinic, the Specialty Clinic (General Surgery, Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Otolaryngology (ENT), Urology, and Wound Ostomy Care), the Walk-In Clinic, the Union Clinic, and the Women's & Children's Clinic (Gynecology, Obstetrics and Pediatrics). For more information, visit www.grh.org.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Allegheny Health Network (AHN) has opened western Pennsylvania’s first after-hours clinic for cancer patients, designed specifically to address their unique needs outside the emergency room setting. With the opening of Allegheny Health Network Cancer Institute Extended Hours Oncology Clinic, AHN is at the forefront of an emerging national trend of expanded, after-hours care for cancer patients, many of whom will visit an emergency room at some point during their treatment or recovery. These patients need timely care in the appropriate clinical setting in order to maintain their wellness and quality of life, and optimize their symptom management. Embedded in the West Penn Hospital’s Mellon Pavilion Medical Oncology Clinic in Pittsburgh’s Bloomfield neighborhood, the clinic will initially be open Monday through Friday from 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. and staffed by a certified registered nurse practitioner, a registered nurse and a medical assistant, all trained in oncology-specific protocols and working under the direction of an oncologist. “The side effects of treatment can pose considerable difficulty for cancer patients. In 2014, western Pennsylvania emergency rooms logged nearly 3,000 visits from cancer patients,” said David Parda, MD, Chair, Allegheny Health Network Cancer Institute. “With the opening of the Extended Hours Oncology Clinic, AHN is filling a gap in the continuum of care for one of our most vulnerable populations.” Side effects can significantly decrease quality of life for cancer patients. These symptoms – many of which worsen in the evening hours - may include pain, fever, fatigue, upper respiratory infections, coughing, painful mouth sores that make it difficult to eat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, dehydration and rashes. While a trip to the emergency room will continue to be the best option for cancer patients with life-threatening symptoms such as chest pain or shortness of breath, the ER can be risky for cancer patients, who may have compromised immune systems. Having a designated treatment space for cancer patients is also expected to decrease wait times for treatment. Care for patients doesn’t end with a visit to the extended hours clinic. Clinic caregivers will connect patients with services that will ensure a smooth transition of care from clinic to home and community, services such as AHN’s Healthcare@Home and Supportive Medicine Service. AHN’s philosophy is that all cancer patients should have access to supportive care, regardless of their disease stage. A 48-hour post-discharge follow-up call from a nurse navigator to all patients will ensure that needed services have begun and help facilitate any additional patient needs. “The extended hours clinic for oncology patients is expected to optimize clinical outcomes, reduce hospital admissions and readmissions, expand access to at-home, supportive and palliative care, and enhance the patient experience while reducing the cost of care,” Dr. Parda said. “It is a positive step forward for healthcare in western Pennsylvania, and most importantly, for our patients.” Alex Brennsteiner, Clinical Program Manager, Highmark Home and Community Services; Crystal Costanza Ross, Director of Program Development, Allegheny Health Network Cancer Institute, and Marjie Leslie, Director of Clinical Services for Allegheny Clinic Medical Oncology played leading roles in the planning and development of the oncology after-hours clinic. The Allegheny Health Network Cancer Institute Extended Hours Oncology Clinic can be accessed via the Mellon Pavilion entrance at 4815 Liberty Ave. or the parking garage at the corner of Liberty Avenue and South Millvale Street. A staff member will escort patients to the clinic. The clinic is open only to patients being treated for cancer at Allegheny Health Network. Appointments are required and can be made only through designated oncologists. Those wanting more information about the Extended Hours Clinic may contact Joann Straessley at 412-359-3559. About Allegheny Health Network Allegheny Health Network is a western Pennsylvania-based integrated healthcare system that serves patients from across a five state region that includes Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland and New York. The Network’s Cancer Institute offers a complete spectrum of oncology care, including access to state-of-the-art technologies and new therapies being explored in clinical cancer trials. The Network’s radiation oncology program is the largest in the country and is accredited by the American College of Radiology. AHN also has a formal affiliation with the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, one of the nation’s 41 comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute, for research, medical education and clinical services.


Zolnierek J.,Oncology Clinic | Nurzynski P.,Oncology Clinic | Langiewicz P.,Oncology Clinic | Oborska S.,Oncology Clinic | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology | Year: 2010

Introduction: This single-centre retrospective analysis of data from three randomised studies and two expanded-access studies compared the effect of interferon (IFN)-alfa, sunitinib, and sorafenib on the occurrence and progression of metastatic bone lesions in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: The analysis included 292 patients: 107 received sunitinib 50 mg/day in 6-week cycles (Schedule 4/2), 147 received sorafenib 800 mg/day, and 38 received placebo or IFN-alfa 9 MU t.i.w. Results: Pre-existing metastatic bone lesions were reported in 82 patients, of which 30 experienced progression. Twenty-three of 210 patients developed new bone lesions. Overall, sunitinib appeared slightly more effective than sorafenib or IFN-alfa at extending mean time to progression of pre-existing bone lesions (P = 0.057). Compared with sorafenib, sunitinib significantly decreased formation (P = 0.034) and prolonged time to occurrence of new bone lesions (P = 0.047). Conclusion: Further evaluation of the effect of these therapies on bone metastases in RCC is warranted. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.


Ellidag H.Y.,Central Laboratories of Antalya Education and Research Hospital | Eren E.,Antalya Public Health Center | Aydin O.,Central Laboratories of Antalya Education and Research Hospital | Yldrm M.,Oncology Clinic | And 2 more authors.
Medical Principles and Practice | Year: 2013

Objective: To investigate the status of the oxidant/antioxidant balance in patients with multiple myeloma compared to healthy controls. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 40 multiple myeloma patients and 40 healthy controls of matched age and sex. Serum total thiol, oxidative stress index (OSI), total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured using colourimetric methods; paraoxonase-1 and arylesterase enzyme activities were also quantified. Results: Serum paraoxonase-1 and arylesterase activities and total thiol levels were significantly lower (p = 0.0001, p = 0.036 and p < 0.0001, respectively), whereas TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher (p < 0.0001 for both parameters) in multiple myeloma patients compared to controls. However, no significant differences in TAS were identified when the two groups were compared. Conclusions: Our findings indicate an impaired oxidative/antioxidative balance in multiple myeloma. We recommend further studies with larger groups to investigate the possible relationship between oxidative stress and the aetiopathogenesis of multiple myeloma. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Kaprara A.,Anticancer Hospital Theagenio | Pazaitou-Panayiotou K.,Anticancer Hospital Theagenio | Chemonidou M.C.,Democritus University of Thrace | Constantinidis T.C.,Laboratory of Hygiene | And 6 more authors.
Neuropeptides | Year: 2010

The hypothalamic neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) has been found in several types of human cancer, where its biological role is not clarified. In experimental models of breast cancer CRF has been shown to exert anti-proliferative and other actions. Aim of the present study was to describe the expression of the two types of CRF receptors CRF1 and CRF2 in human breast tumors. Receptor expression was studied in breast biopsies from patients diagnosed for primary breast adenocarcinoma, obtained from the tumor and the adjacent benign tissue. Gene expression levels were evaluated by real-time PCR following reverse transcription of total RNA extracts. CRF1 transcripts were found in 23.1% of benign and in 23.1% of malignant biopsies. CRF2(a) was found in 22.2% of benign and 36.0% of malignant biopsies. Transcript levels of both receptors did not differ significantly between cancer and benign biopsies from the same tumor. No correlation was found between CRF receptor expression and patient histo/clinicopathological characteristics. Histological mapping using immunohistochemistry revealed positive CRF1 immunostaining in the cancerous implants and breast ducts, whereas CRF2 immunoreactivity was localized mainly in the perineural invasions. In conclusion, both CRF receptors were found in breast cancer and the respective benign adjacent tissue. The two CRF receptor proteins presented distinct distribution and subcellular localization, pointing into differing biological roles. CRF receptors could serve as targets of endogenous ligands expressed in the tumor microenvironment, regulating cancer growth. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Oncology Clinic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Best practice & research. Clinical rheumatology | Year: 2012

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory spondyloarthritis that occurs in combination with psoriasis. The exact prevalence of PsA is unknown, and its pathogenesis has not yet been fully elucidated. Genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors have all been implicated. The appearance of arthritis might precede, succeed or occur concomitant with skin lesions. PsA is sometimes considered a benign form of arthritis, but it affects patient quality of life and also causes functional impairment. Up to 20% of affected patients exhibit extremely destructive and disfiguring forms of the disease, and PsA is associated with increased mortality. The treatment of PsA aims to provide relief from signs and symptoms of the disease, prevent structural damage to joints, improve patient quality of life and decrease mortality. The choice of treatment depends on the severity of clinical presentation. The use of immunobiological agents is restricted to cases that do not respond to conservative treatment.

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