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Fashoyin-Aje L.A.,Oncology Center
Journal of Supportive Oncology | Year: 2012

The Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons publishes accreditation standards that hospitals and cancer treatment centers implement to ensure quality care to cancer patients. These standards address the full spectrum of cancer care, from cancer prevention to survivorship and end-of-life care. The most recent revisions of these standards included new standards in "patient-centered areas," including the provision of palliative care services, treatment and survivorship plans, psychological distress screening, and patient navigation programs. Unified by their emphasis on the early identification of patients at risk of receiving suboptimal care and the importance of ensuring that issues arising during and after completion of cancer treatment are addressed, they are a welcome expansion of the standards guiding cancer care. As with all standards, however, the next steps will be to further define how they will be implemented and to determine how success will be assessed. This will require ongoing critical evaluation of the standards and their implementation, including the need for member institutions to define successful implementation methods and measurable outcomes and identification of areas most in need of further research. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Schaffer M.,Institute of Oncology | Schaffer P.M.,Oncology Center | Zidan J.,Institute of Oncology | Sela G.B.,University of Sfax
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care | Year: 2011

Purpose of Review: Several nutritional compounds are the focus of public attention because of their potential beneficial health effects. Turmeric is a spice that comes from the root Curcuma longa. Extensive research over the past half century and especially in recent years has revealed important functions of curcumin and a timely review of clinical state-of-the-art using curcumin. Recent Findings: In-vitro and in-vivo research has shown various activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antifungal, cytokines release, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, enhancing of the apoptotic process, and antiangiogenic properties. Curcumin also have been shown to be a mediator of chemo-resistance and radio-resistance. Summary: Various in-vitro and in-vivo and scarce number of clinical studies on curcumin were identified. The various effects and properties of curcumin are summarized in this review, including preclinical and especially clinical studies. This review concentrates on recent knowledge and research with curcumin clinical applications, and clinical studies, focusing on studies published between 2008 and 2011 demonstrating the gap between preclinical and clinical research. © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In order for cancer to spread, malignant cells must break away from a tumor and through the tough netting of extracellular matrix, or ECM, that surrounds it. To fit through the holes in this net, those cancerous cells must elongate into a torpedo-like shape. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and The Wistar Institute have now found that physical forces exerted between these cells and the ECM are enough to drive this shape change. Those forces converge on an optimal stiffness that allows cancer cells to spread. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that drugs that target the stiffness of the ECM could potentially be used to prevent metastasis. he study was led by Vivek Shenoy, professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering in Penn's School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Hossein Ahmadzadeh, a graduate student in his lab, with contributions from Ashani Weeraratna, the Ira Brind Associate Professor and program leader of the Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis Program at Wistar. Research on the physical-feedback mechanisms between cancer cells and their environment is part of Penn Engineering's larger efforts to understand such dynamics, housed at the Physical Sciences Oncology Center and the new Center for Engineering Mechanobiology, which is co-directed by Shenoy. Shenoy and colleagues published findings that detailed the feedback mechanism exhibited by cancer cells and the ECM surrounding them. There, they showed how this mechanism stiffens and aligns the collagen fibers found in ECM. The new work looks at the cell side of the equation and how cells must switch from rounded to elongated in order to leave the tumor squeeze through the ECM. "What we're showing is that the mechanical factors alone can lead to the change in phenotype in cancer cells," Shenoy said. "This is the first quantitative analysis of the shapes of cancer cells as they invade from the tumor." The Penn researchers postulated that the key factor of this interplay is finding a "sweet spot" in the stiffness of the ECM. "The cells in a tumor are sticky," Shenoy said. "Without the collagen fibers of the ECM pulling on those cells, you can't break that cell-cell adhesion. But, if the ECM is too stiff, the pores in the matrix become too narrow and the cells can't escape." After the Penn team modeled these interactions in computer simulations, the Weeraratna lab at Wistar conducted matching experiments to see if the results held up. "We used melanoma spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix as a 3-D model to mimic in vitro what happens in the body when tumor cells leave the primary tumor to invade other tissues," said Weeraratna. "Our observations perfectly matched and complemented the computer model. This study reaffirms, from a mechanobiology standpoint, the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in orchestrating the fate of cancer cells and dictating prognosis and response to therapy." Insights from cancer mechanobiology could inform future diagnostics and potentially even treatments. "The takeaway is that, if you look at what's going on outside the tumor, you could make a prognosis of whether it will spread," Shenoy said. Co-authors of this study include Marie R. Webster and Reeti Behera of Wistar and Angela M. Jimenez Valencia and Denis Wirtz of Johns Hopkins University. This work was supported by National Cancer Institute grants U01CA202177, U54CA193417 and U54CA210173; National Institutes of Health grants R01EB017753, R01CA174746 and K99 CA208012-01; and National Science Foundation grant CMMI-1548571. Core support for The Wistar Institute was provided by the Cancer Center Support Grant P30CA010815.


Fayetteville, NC, February 24, 2017 --( The project, which began in late August 2016, required demolition of the existing space. Renovations to the facility include new acoustical ceiling tiles and grids, new wall coatings, wall protection, doorframes, floor tile and epoxy flooring, updated fire protection, as well as upgrades to the facility’s electrical and plumbing systems. The renovations to the CFVH Lung Nodule Clinic and Oncology Center will improve patient care by enabling the hospital to determine whether a patient’s lung nodule is benign or malignant in a more efficient manner. These diagnoses allow the hospital staff to properly treat lung cancer, giving the hospital an upper hand and another asset in the fight against cancer. Located within the Cape Fear Valley Health System in Fayetteville, the CFVH Lung and Nodule Clinic and Oncology Center will be staffed by pulmonologists, respiratory therapists and nurses. Known for completing projects on time and on budget, Riley Contracting Group has extensive experience with medical and laboratory construction projects in the Triangle, including projects for Duke University Health Systems and WakeMed Health and Hospitals. Most recently, Riley Contracting completed a $1.3M interior fit up for Duke Primary Care Oxford to relocate the family medical clinic to a more convenient location for the community. Quotes: “We’re proud to have been given the opportunity to work with Cape Fear Valley Health, an exceptional hospital serving the Fayetteville and Fort Bragg communities, on this project and other upcoming projects as well,” said Calin Riley, president of Riley Contracting. “The updated facilities will aid Cape Fear Valley’s premiere staff deliver patient-centered care and save lives of those suffering from cancer.” New Media Content: Riley Contracting Group Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rileycontgroup Riley Contracting Group Twitter account: https://twitter.com/rileycontgroup Riley Contracting Group LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/riley-contracting-group-inc- About Riley Contracting Group: Riley Contracting Group, Inc. is a team-oriented general contractor that has been building relationships throughout central North Carolina for more than 25 years. Founded in 1987 by Michael G. Riley, the firm specializes in commercial construction for industries including assisted living, biotech and pharmaceutical, retail, healthcare, education, industrial and municipal. Riley Contracting Group serves both the North Carolina and South Carolina markets. Fayetteville, NC, February 24, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Riley Contracting Group, a family-owned, local general contractor serving North Carolina for over 25 years, has completed renovations to the Cape Fear Valley Health (CFVH) Lung Nodule Clinic and Oncology Center, increasing the scope of patient care available at the facility.The project, which began in late August 2016, required demolition of the existing space. Renovations to the facility include new acoustical ceiling tiles and grids, new wall coatings, wall protection, doorframes, floor tile and epoxy flooring, updated fire protection, as well as upgrades to the facility’s electrical and plumbing systems.The renovations to the CFVH Lung Nodule Clinic and Oncology Center will improve patient care by enabling the hospital to determine whether a patient’s lung nodule is benign or malignant in a more efficient manner. These diagnoses allow the hospital staff to properly treat lung cancer, giving the hospital an upper hand and another asset in the fight against cancer.Located within the Cape Fear Valley Health System in Fayetteville, the CFVH Lung and Nodule Clinic and Oncology Center will be staffed by pulmonologists, respiratory therapists and nurses.Known for completing projects on time and on budget, Riley Contracting Group has extensive experience with medical and laboratory construction projects in the Triangle, including projects for Duke University Health Systems and WakeMed Health and Hospitals. Most recently, Riley Contracting completed a $1.3M interior fit up for Duke Primary Care Oxford to relocate the family medical clinic to a more convenient location for the community.Quotes:“We’re proud to have been given the opportunity to work with Cape Fear Valley Health, an exceptional hospital serving the Fayetteville and Fort Bragg communities, on this project and other upcoming projects as well,” said Calin Riley, president of Riley Contracting. “The updated facilities will aid Cape Fear Valley’s premiere staff deliver patient-centered care and save lives of those suffering from cancer.”New Media Content:Riley Contracting Group Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/rileycontgroupRiley Contracting Group Twitter account:https://twitter.com/rileycontgroupRiley Contracting Group LinkedIn page:https://www.linkedin.com/company/riley-contracting-group-inc-About Riley Contracting Group:Riley Contracting Group, Inc. is a team-oriented general contractor that has been building relationships throughout central North Carolina for more than 25 years. Founded in 1987 by Michael G. Riley, the firm specializes in commercial construction for industries including assisted living, biotech and pharmaceutical, retail, healthcare, education, industrial and municipal. Riley Contracting Group serves both the North Carolina and South Carolina markets. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Riley Contracting


LYON, France, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- EDAP TMS SA (Nasdaq:EDAP), the global leader in therapeutic ultrasound, today announced the publication of results comparing Ablatherm Focal HIFU with Robotic Radical Prostatectomy. The results of the study have been electronically published in the prestigious peer-reviewed medical Journal of Endourology; the study will subsequently appear in a print edition. This matched pair analysis of HIFU hemiablation vs robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy was conducted by Professor Roland van Velthoven, Head of the Urology Department at the Institut Bordet Oncology Center in Brussels, Belgium. In this study, 55 patients with unilateral localized prostate cancer were treated using Ablatherm-HIFU and their outcomes were compared 1:1 with patients, having similar clinical criteria but underwent robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. The matched pair analysis concluded that HIFU was comparable to robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of prostate cancer and showed HIFU to have significantly better functional outcomes. Prof. van Velthoven commented: "Clinical outcomes from this comparative study are extremely encouraging as they confirm the efficacy of HIFU focal in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, reporting similar results to radical prostatectomy in terms of cancer control at 5 years. More importantly, the study proves focal HIFU superiority in terms of side effects with significantly higher continence and potency preservation rates at both 1 month and 2 years after the procedure. Focal HIFU is the ideal minimally invasive approach for patients with low risk prostate cancer seeking treatment of their disease while preserving their quality of life". Marc Oczachowski, EDAP TMS Chief Executive Officer, added: "We are very enthusiastic about the published results from this study. Once again, the data confirms HIFU as a viable option in the focal ablation of prostatic tissue. It offers patients a non-invasive alternative to current radical treatments. The need for our HIFU treatment is now more evident following the recent publications of the ProtecT study in the New England Journal of Medicine and the Ablatherm-HIFU hemiablation study in the European Urology journal." Link to abstract: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27799004 (epub ahead of print in Journal of Endourology). EDAP TMS SA markets today Ablatherm® for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for prostate tissue ablation in the U.S. and for treatment of localized prostate cancer in the rest of the world. HIFU treatment is shown to be a minimally invasive and effective option for prostatic tissue ablation with a low occurrence of side effects. Ablatherm-HIFU is generally recommended for patients with localized prostate cancer (stages T1-T2) who are not candidates for surgery or who prefer an alternative option, or for patients who failed radiotherapy treatment. Ablatherm-HIFU is approved for commercial distribution in Europe and some other countries including Mexico and Canada, and has received 510(k) clearance by the U.S. FDA. The Company also markets an innovative robot-assisted HIFU device, the Focal One®, dedicated to focal therapy of prostate cancer. Focal One® is CE marked but is not FDA approved. The Company also develops its HIFU technology for the potential treatment of certain other types of tumors. EDAP TMS SA also produces and distributes medical equipment (the Sonolith® lithotripters’ range) for the treatment of urinary tract stones using extra-corporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) in most countries including Canada and the U.S. For more information on the Company, please visit http://www.edap-tms.com, and http://www.hifu-planet.com. In addition to historical information, this press release may contain forward-looking statements. Such statements are based on management’s current expectations and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including matters not yet known to us or not currently considered material by us, and there can be no assurance that anticipated events will occur or that the objectives set out will actually be achieved. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results anticipated in the forward-looking statements include, among others, the clinical status and market acceptance of our HIFU devices and the continued market potential for our lithotripsy device. Factors that may cause such a difference also may include, but are not limited to, those described in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission and in particular, in the sections "Cautionary Statement on Forward-Looking Information" and "Risk Factors" in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 20-F.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Herbert B. Newton, MD, FAAN, Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. He is a highly-trained and qualified neurologist with expertise in all facets of his work. Dr. Herbert B. Newton has been practicing for more than 32 years, 25 of which were spent at Ohio State University and the Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, having retired in June 2015. He is currently on staff at the Kettering Cancer Center and the Florida Hospital Cancer Institute, serving patients in Neuro-Oncology. As of December 31, 2015, Dr. Newton will be leaving Kettering Cancer Center, transitioning to be the full time Director of the Neuro-Oncology Center and CNS Oncology Program at the Florida Hospital Cancer Institute. Dr. Herbert B. Newton gained his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Buffalo in New York State in 1984. An internship then followed at Buffalo University Hospital, prior to completing his residency in Neurology at the University of Michigan Medical Center, and fellowship in Neuro-Oncology at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. He is the author of eight published books, and numerous articles and papers, along with remaining a member of the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Newton has also earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, and attributes his success to his hard work and dedication. When not assisting patients, he likes to play music, and enjoys scuba diving. Learn more about Dr. Newton here: https://www.floridahospitalcancer.com/ and by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit: http://www.findatopdoc.com


Mohammed A.A.,Oncology Center | Mohammed A.A.,Zagazig University
Medical Oncology | Year: 2014

Currently, most men are diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) after a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test shows an elevated level of the PSA protein. An elevated level suggests cancer may be present. If an elevation is detected, a biopsy to detect cancer is followed. But the PSA test is controversial. An elevated level does not always mean there is cancer present. The test often leads men to having unnecessary biopsies and treatments. Even if cancer is found on biopsy, many of these cancers are slow growing and would not impact the lives of the men who have them. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for PCa. The purpose of this review is to examine the advances in PCa biomarkers and implication for possible improving disease outcome. The future of cancer prognosis may rely on small panels of markers that can accurately predict PCa presence, stage, and metastasis and can serve as prognosticators, targets, and/or surrogate endpoints of disease progression and response to therapy. © Springer Science+Business Media 2014.


Orphanos G.,Private Hospital | Kountourakis P.,Oncology Center
Hematology/ Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy | Year: 2013

The advent of targeted therapies has revolutionized the treatment of certain types of cancer. Identification of molecular targets on cancer cells has led to the design of novel drugs, which either used as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy, has prolonged survival in metastatic disease, or contributed to curative treatment in the adjuvant setting. A literature review was conducted to identify and present current knowledge on the molecular function of the HER2 receptor, its role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and anti-HER2 targeted drugs in use or under development. Many molecular targets have been identified in breast cancer, with the HER family of receptors being the ones most extensively studied. Trastuzumab and lapatinib target the HER2 receptor and are approved drugs for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Several other targeted agents, including T-DM1, pertuzumab, neratinib, afatinib and ertumaxomab, are currently being tested in vivo as well as in clinical studies. The use of targeted therapies in metastatic breast cancer has improved prognosis, increased survival and dramatically changed the way we treat breast cancer patients today.


Ibrahim E.M.,Oncology Center | Al-Homaidh A.,Prince Sultan Cancer Center
Medical Oncology | Year: 2011

Published data have shown that physical activity (PA) has a positive role on the primary prevention of breast cancer risk. However, the role of PA on breast cancer outcome has been controversial with inconsistent data. The lack of a meta-analysis that addresses that issue prompted the current report. A comprehensive literature search identified eight studies, of which two studies were excluded. The remaining six studies (12,108 patients with breast cancer) were included in this meta-analysis. Pre-diagnosis PA reduced all causes mortality by 18% but had no effect on breast cancer deaths. Post-diagnosis PA reduced breast cancer deaths by 34% (HR = 0.66, 95% CI, 0.57-0.77, P < 0.00001), all causes mortality by 41% (HR = 0.59, 95% CI, 0.53-0.65, P < 0.00001), and disease recurrence by 24% (HR = 0.76, 95% CI, 0.66-0.87, P = 0.00001). Breast cancer mortality was reduced by pre-diagnosis PA in women with body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m2, while post-diagnosis PA reduced that risk among those with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. On the other hand, post-diagnosis PA reduced all causes mortality regardless of the BMI. The analysis showed that post-diagnosis PA reduced breast cancer deaths (HR = 0.50, 95% CI, 0.34-0.74, P = 0.0005), and all causes mortality (HR = 0.36, 95% CI, 0.12-1.03, P = 0.06) among patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumor, while women with ER-negative disease showed no gain. The current meta-analysis provides evidence for an inverse relationship between PA and mortality in patients with breast cancer and supports the notion that appropriate PA should be embraced by breast cancer survivors. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Elsamany S.,Oncology Center | Elsamany S.,Mansoura University | Abdullah S.,Oncology Center
Medical Oncology | Year: 2014

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype comprising about 10-20 % of breast cancer patients with an overall poor prognosis. Recently, it was found to be a heterogeneous disease that has been classified into six subtypes based on molecular signature. In preclinical trials, these subtypes have different active signaling pathways with variable response to chemotherapy. To improve treatment outcome of TNBC, therapy should be tailored according to the active driving signaling aberration. Molecular testing represents the optimal way to stratify patients, but it has some difficulties to be implemented in routine clinical practice. This article provides an assumption for stepped diagnostic algorithm of TNBC based on immunohistochemistry markers in addition to a suggested tailored therapeutic strategy for advanced TNBC based on the driving aberrations. Furthermore, most TNBC patients develop early relapse despite adjuvant chemotherapy. We provide a design for future adjuvant therapy for the disease. This design is based on targeting proposed active pathways in breast cancer stem cells responsible for regenerating the tumor and disease relapse. Finally, we provide a proposed design for future clinical trials in TNBC to allow for investigation of different medications in this heterogeneous disease based on upfront patient stratification and then allocation to the suitable treatment arms. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

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