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Amorim S.,Hopital Saint Louis | Stathis A.,Istituto Oncologico Della Svizzera Italiana | Gleeson M.,Royal Marsden Hospital | Iyengar S.,Royal Marsden Hospital | And 15 more authors.
The Lancet Haematology | Year: 2016

Background: The first-in-class small molecule inhibitor OTX015 (MK-8628) specifically binds to bromodomain motifs BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 of bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins, inhibiting them from binding to acetylated histones, which occurs preferentially at super-enhancer regions that control oncogene expression. OTX015 is active in haematological preclinical entities including leukaemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. We aimed to establish the recommended dose of OTX015 in patients with haematological malignancies. We report the results from a cohort of patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma (non-leukaemia cohort). Methods: In this dose-escalation, open-label, phase 1 study, we recruited patients from seven university hospital centres (in France [four], Switzerland [one], UK [one], and Italy [one]). Adult patients with non-leukaemia haematological malignancies who had disease progression on standard therapies were eligible to participate. Patients were treated with oral OTX015 once a day continuously over five doses (10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg, 80 mg, and 120 mg), using a conventional 3 + 3 design, with allowance for evaluation of alternative administration schedules. The primary endpoint was dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in the first treatment cycle (21 days). Secondary objectives were to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary clinical activity of OTX015. The study is ongoing and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01713582. Findings: Between Feb 4, 2013, and Sept 5, 2014, 45 patients (33 with lymphoma and 12 with myeloma), with a median age of 66 years (IQR 55-72) and a median of four lines of prior therapy (IQR 3-5), were enrolled and treated. No DLTs were observed in the doses up to and including 80 mg once a day (first three patients). We then explored a schedule of 40 mg twice a day (21 of 21 days). DLTs were reported in five of six patients receiving OTX015 at this dose and schedule (all five patients had grade 4 thrombocytopenia). We explored various schedules at 120 mg once a day but none was tolerable, with DLTs of thrombocytopenia, gastrointestinal events (diarrhoea, vomiting, dysgeusia, mucositis), fatigue, and hyponatraemia in 11 of 18 evaluable patients. At this point, the Safety Monitoring Committee decided to establish the feasibility of 80 mg once a day on a continuous basis, and four additional patients were enrolled at this dose. DLTs (grade 4 thrombocytopenia) was noted in two of the patients. In light of these DLTs and other toxicities noted at 120 mg, the dose of 80 mg once a day was selected, although on a schedule of 14 days on, 7 days off. Common toxic effects reported in the study were thrombocytopenia (43 [96%] patients), anaemia (41 [91%]), neutropenia (23 [51%]), diarrhoea (21 [47%]), fatigue (12 [27%]), and nausea (11 [24%]). Grade 3-4 adverse events were infrequent other than thrombocytopenia (26 [58%]). OTX015 plasma peak concentrations and areas under the concentration versus time curve increased proportionally with dose. Trough concentrations increased less than proportionally at lower doses, but reached or exceeded the in-vitro active range at 40 mg twice a day and 120 mg once a day. Three patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma achieved durable objective responses (two complete responses at 120 mg once a day, and one partial response at 80 mg once a day), and six additional patients (two with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, four with indolent lymphomas) had evidence of clinical activity, albeit not meeting objective response criteria. Interpretation: The once-daily recommended dose for oral, single agent oral OTX015 in patients with lymphoma is 80 mg on a 14 days on, 7 days off schedule, for phase 2 studies. OTX015 is under evaluation in expansion cohorts using this intermittent administration (14 days every 3 weeks) to allow for recovery from toxic effects. Funding: Oncoethix GmbH (a wholly owned subsidiary of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp). © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source


A method of treating B-cell malignant cancers or T-cell malignant cancers in a mammal by administering to a patient a pharmaceutically acceptable amount of a composition comprising (S)-2-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,3,9-trimethyl-6H-thieno[3,2-f][1,2,4]triazolo-[4,3-a][1,4]diazepin-6-yl]-N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)acetamide. The B-cell malignant cancers include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and splenic marginal zone lymphoma. The T-cell malignant cancers include anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma.


Disclosed herein are compositions comprising a galectin-1-targeting compound in a therapeutically effective composition for treating cancer. In an aspect, a galectin-1-targeting compound is OTX-008. Also disclosed herein are methods of making and using such compositions.


News Article | April 2, 2015
Site: www.fiercebiotech.com

Index Ventures now has 650 million more euros to invest. The venture group, which has two big teams active on both sides of the Atlantic in life sciences as well as tech, filed documents with the SEC noting that its new Index Ventures Growth III--domiciled in Jersey--is fully sold. There was no immediate response to a query from FierceBiotech about its plans for the new money. But Index has been a key go-to VC in the European biotech scene in recent years. And like a lot of VCs, Index is finding that an acquisitive crowd of Big Pharma players has provided some nice exits in a booming market, setting the stage for a whole new generation of funds like this. In just the last few months Index has seen its first exit (for X01) out of its special, asset-centric biotech portfolio set up with J&J and GlaxoSmithKline, the sale of GlycoVaxyn, a spinout from ETH Zurich that was snapped up by GlaxoSmithKline for its work on bioconjugate vaccines, and Merck's buyout of OncoEthix. Even with a weak euro Index still has $706 million to invest, making it one of the bigger new funds to debut in a go-go investment scene. Flagship Ventures rolled out its new early-stage fund with $537 million just days ago, as it was partnering up with Arch Venture to operate a special $150 million venture effort aimed at encouraging the growth of a biotech hub in New York City. Two months ago Lux Capital, which includes biotech in its lineup, raised $350 million. New Enterprise Associates is working on its latest $2.5 billion-plus behemoth, while a whole string of new funds has appeared over the past 18 months promising to bankroll a new wave of biotechs for several years to come. Related Articles: Levicept emerges from Pfizer's R&D ashes with $20M and a new pain drug Egalet scores up to $20M for next-gen pain drug as FDA aims to block abuse Swiss biotech OncoEthix snags $19M round to back leukemia drug study


Berthon C.,Lille University Hospital Center | Raffoux E.,Hopital Saint Louis | Raffoux E.,University Paris Diderot | Thomas X.,University of Lyon | And 17 more authors.
The Lancet Haematology | Year: 2016

Background: Bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins are chromatin readers that preferentially affect the transcription of genes with super-enhancers, including oncogenes. BET proteins bind acetylated histone tails via their bromodomain, bringing the elongation complex to the promoter region. OTX015 (MK-8628) specifically binds to BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4, preventing BET proteins from binding to the chromatin, thus inhibiting gene transcription. OTX015 inhibits proliferation in many haematological malignancy cell lines and patient cells, in vitro and in vivo. We aimed to establish the recommended dose of OTX015 in patients with haematological malignancies. We report the results of patients with acute leukaemia (leukaemia cohort). Methods: In this dose-escalation, phase 1 study we recruited patients from seven university hospital centres (in France [five], UK [one], and Canada [one]). Adults with acute leukaemia who had failed or had a contraindication to standard therapies were eligible to participate. OTX015 was given orally at increasing doses from 10 mg/day to 160 mg/day (14 of 21 days), using a conventional 3 + 3 design. In this open-label trial, OTX015 was initially administered once a day, with allowance for exploration of other schedules. The primary endpoint was dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), assessed during the first treatment cycle (21 days). The study is ongoing and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01713582. Findings: Between Jan 18, 2013, and Sept 9, 2014, 41 patients, 36 with acute myeloid leukaemia, a median age of 70 years (IQR 60-75) and two lines of previous therapy, were recruited and treated across six dose levels of OTX015. No DLT was recorded until 160 mg/day, when one patient had grade 3 diarrhoea and another had grade 3 fatigue. However, concomitant grade 1-2 non-DLT toxic effects (ie, gastrointestinal, fatigue, or cutaneous) from 120 mg doses hampered patient compliance and 80 mg once a day was judged the recommended dose with a 14 days on, 7 days off schedule. Common toxic effects for all OTX015 doses were fatigue (including grade 3 in three patients) and bilirubin concentration increases (including grade 3-4 in two patients). OTX015 plasma exposure increased proportionally up to 120 mg/day with trough concentrations in the in-vitro active range from 80 mg/day (274 nmol/L). Three patients (receiving 40 mg/day, 80 mg/day, and 160 mg/day) achieved complete remission or complete remission with incomplete recovery of platelets lasting 2-5 months, and two additional patients had partial blast clearance. No predictive biomarkers for response have been identified so far. Interpretation: The once-daily recommended dose for oral, single agent oral OTX015 use in patients with acute leukaemia for further phase 2 studies is 80 mg on a 14 days on, 7 days off schedule. Funding: Oncoethix GmbH, a wholly owned subsidiary of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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