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Austin J.A.,OMV UK Ltd. | Cannon S.J.C.,DONG e and P UK Ltd | Cannon S.J.C.,Steve Cannon Geoscience Ltd | Ellis D.,Statoil
Geological Society Special Publication | Year: 2014

The oil and gas industry has been active in the West of Shetlands area for the last 40 years, but less than 200 wells have been drilled and only four fields have been developed. In the last ten years activity has picked up significantly with very active licensing rounds and increased drilling; however, the challenges of the complex geology and deep-water location, environmental constraints and commercial considerations have also increased at the same time. To fully develop the region successfully an attitude of compromise and collaboration between all the stakeholders must be nurtured, but with the scale of investment required this will remain a challenge for the future. © The Geological Society of London 2014. Source


Lawrie G.,OMV UK Ltd.
Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/APPEA Int. Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges | Year: 2012

The Macondo event brought into sharp focus the role and liabilities of non-operating partners in oil and gas developments. One of the partners in this tragic event recently settled liabilities of some $4 Billion, to pay for damages incurred by the operating party. This has raised the question among oil and gas companies, most of whom function as both Operator and Non-Operating Partner, as to what extent they should or could influence the HSE performance of an operating partner. There are still many conflicting opinions about the role that a non-operating partner should fulfil; from almost no involvement on the one hand to close supervision and direction at the other end of the scale. Non Operating Companies are being held liable for the actions of their operating partners and their contractors, so they must be prepared to take action to ensure that their operating partners develop and maintain HSE excellence throughout the lifetime of the project. Copyright 2012, SPE/APPEA International Conference on Health, Safety, and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production. Source


Pickering G.,OMV UK Ltd. | Rodriguez J.M.,OMV Exploration GmbH
73rd European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition 2011: Unconventional Resources and the Role of Technology. Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2011 | Year: 2011

The Tornado field lies in the northern area of the Judd Basin, West of Shetlands UKCS at approximately 1000m water depth. It is primarily a stratigraphic trap, defined by an amplitude anomaly on seismic data at Palaeocene Lamba level. As many amplitude anomalies previously drilled in the area proved to be unsuccessful the prospect was viewed as high risk. An extensive work programme was carried out to address these risks, including an analysis of the amplitude anomaly, a CSEM survey and the development of a geological model. The CSEM results and the seismic analysis predicted the presence of hydrocarbons in the prospect. This was supported by the geological work, which provided a basis for the key petroleum system requirements, particularly migration, reservoir and seal. Based on the results, a well was drilled in 2009 on the structure, proving the presence of both gas and oil. These results came in mostly as expected showing the value of the detailed analysis that had preceded the well. The Tornado discovery shows the importance of combining good geophysical work with a good geological model. Source


Jones M.T.,University of Oslo | Jerram D.A.,University of Oslo | Jerram D.A.,DougalEARTH Ltd. | Jerram D.A.,Queensland University of Technology | And 2 more authors.
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology | Year: 2016

The correlation between large igneous provinces (LIPs), extinction events, and rapid climate change suggests that volcanism can have a detrimental impact on Earth surface conditions. Changes in atmospheric and ocean chemistry, particularly the climate-sensitive carbon and sulphur cycles, are among the most probable processes for inducing global environmental stress. However, the interactions and feedbacks between volcanism and these cycles are numerous and complex, making the characterisation of the response to a LIP challenging. Here we summarise the sources and sinks of carbon and sulphur from large scale volcanism and magmatism using information from modern and ancient systems. For the sources, we review the current understanding of volcanic emissions, and explore the relative contributions and importance of magma-derived degassing versus volatile release from sediments affected by igneous intrusions and lava. In addition, we explore the various ways in which LIPs can reduce atmospheric concentrations of these same elements. The relative influences of each source and sink are in part determined by the mode of LIP emplacement and eruption style, along with the subsequent timescales of such effects. We focus on a few key examples, including the Siberian Traps, the Paraná-Etendeka, and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), to demonstrate how the environmental impact can vary considerably with differing modes of emplacement, LIP duration, and eruption styles. In particular, we show that the host rocks can have a dominant role as a source or sink of emissions, depending on the lithologies affected by the LIP emplacement. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source


Jones M.T.,University of Oslo | Jerram D.A.,University of Oslo | Jerram D.A.,Queensland University of Technology | Svensen H.H.,University of Oslo | Grove C.,OMV UK Ltd.
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology | Year: 2015

The correlation between large igneous provinces (LIPs), extinction events, and rapid climate change suggests that volcanism can have a detrimental impact on Earth surface conditions. Changes in atmospheric and ocean chemistry, particularly the climate-sensitive carbon and sulphur cycles, are among the most probable processes for inducing global environmental stress. However, the interactions and feedbacks between volcanism and these cycles are numerous and complex, making the characterisation of the response to a LIP challenging. Here we summarise the sources and sinks of carbon and sulphur from large scale volcanism and magmatism using information from modern and ancient systems. For the sources, we review the current understanding of volcanic emissions, and explore the relative contributions and importance of magma-derived degassing versus volatile release from sediments affected by igneous intrusions and lava. In addition, we explore the various ways in which LIPs can reduce atmospheric concentrations of these same elements. The relative influences of each source and sink are in part determined by the mode of LIP emplacement and eruption style, along with the subsequent timescales of such effects. We focus on a few key examples, including the Siberian Traps, the Paraná-Etendeka, and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), to demonstrate how the environmental impact can vary considerably with differing modes of emplacement, LIP duration, and eruption styles. In particular, we show that the host rocks can have a dominant role as a source or sink of emissions, depending on the lithologies affected by the LIP emplacement. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source

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