Olive Research Station

Kāzerūn, Iran

Olive Research Station

Kāzerūn, Iran
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Aydar A.Y.,Celal Bayar University | Bagdatlioglu N.,Celal Bayar University | Koseoglu O.,Olive Research Station
Grasas y Aceites | Year: 2017

In this study, the effects of different extraction parameters including ultrasound time, temperature and malaxation time on olive oil quality were investigated. The extraction variables ultrasound initial temperature (20-50 °C), ultrasound time (2-10 min) and malaxation time (30-50 min) were studied to obtain ideal conditions of ultrasonic treatment on the olive paste for obtaining of a greater yield in the extraction of oil, while maintaining a maximum level of commercial quality. To evaluate the level of commercial quality, absorbance in the UV region, peroxide (PV) and free acidity values (AV), the total chlorophyll, carotenoid, phenol contents, total antioxidant activity and sensory analysis of EVOOs extracted from Edremit cultivar were determined. The optimum conditions were found to be 50 °C, 2 min and 43.23 min for ultrasound initial temperature, sonication time and malaxation time, respectively. This optimal condition gave an extraction yield of 8.25 % and the acidity value of 0.24 mg oleic acid/100 g olive oil. The experimental values obtained under optimal conditions were in agreement with the theoretical values. © 2017 CSIC.


Chegini M.N.,Guilan University | Malekroudi M.R.,Olive Research Station | Golfazani M.M.,Guilan University | Seighalani R.,Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran
Acta Agriculturae Slovenica | Year: 2016

Iran is known as one of the origins of olive in the world with many different olive cultivars, mainly in the north. Eighty eight accessions belong to 4 main olive cultivars were investigated by 21 morphological characters and 11 ISSR markers. Analyses of morphological characters revealed the existence of high genetic variability among cultivars. Based on both morphological and ISSR cluster analyses, 88 accessions were grouped in five distinct clusters. The ISSR primers produced 77 polymorphic bands. AMOVA showed significant difference in both between and within olive cultivars. The highest and lowest coefficient of Nei's genetic distance was observed in 'Mari' and 'Shengeh' (0.105) and 'Zard' and 'Rowghani' (0.061), respectively. In both morphological and ISSR data analyses, 'Mari' showed the highest homogeneity. The olive cultivars were not clustered based on their geographical origin.


Ramezani S.,Shiraz University | Shekafandeh A.,Shiraz University | Taslimpour M.R.,Olive Research Station
International Journal of Fruit Science | Year: 2010

This study was conducted on ten-year-old 'Shengeh' olive trees at the Kazerun Olive Research Station, Iran to investigate the effect of gibberellic acid (GA3) and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) sprays on fruit yield and oil production. A factorial experiment (4 × 4 × 4) was arranged in a randomized complete block design. The plants were sprayed with 0, 15, 30, and 45 ppm GA3 and 0, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75% ZnSO4 in August, which was about halfway through the fruit growth period. Maximum fruit retention (90%) was obtained by spraying with 0.5% ZnSO4 and 45 ppm GA3. The greatest fruit weight (3.25 g/fruit) was achieved with 30 ppm GA3 and 0.75% ZnSO4. The highest oil % on a dry weight basis (34.75) was produced with 0.50% ZnSO4 + 30 ppm GA3. The results showed that appropriate spraying with GA3 in combination with ZnSO4 increases oil production by increasing both fruit oil and fruit retention. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Kaya H.B.,Ege University | Cetin O.,Olive Research Station | Kaya H.,Olive Research Station | Sahin M.,Olive Research Station | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Background:The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is a diploid (2n = 2x = 46) outcrossing species mainly grown in the Mediterranean area, where it is the most important oil-producing crop. Because of its economic, cultural and ecological importance, various DNA markers have been used in the olive to characterize and elucidate homonyms, synonyms and unknown accessions. However, a comprehensive characterization and a full sequence of its transcriptome are unavailable, leading to the importance of an efficient large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in olive. The objectives of this study were (1) to discover olive SNPs using next-generation sequencing and to identify SNP primers for cultivar identification and (2) to characterize 96 olive genotypes originating from different regions of Turkey.Methodology/Principal Findings:Next-generation sequencing technology was used with five distinct olive genotypes and generated cDNA, producing 126,542,413 reads using an Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx. Following quality and size trimming, the high-quality reads were assembled into 22,052 contigs with an average length of 1,321 bases and 45 singletons. The SNPs were filtered and 2,987 high-quality putative SNP primers were identified. The assembled sequences and singletons were subjected to BLAST similarity searches and annotated with a Gene Ontology identifier. To identify the 96 olive genotypes, these SNP primers were applied to the genotypes in combination with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers.Conclusions/Significance:This study marks the highest number of SNP markers discovered to date from olive genotypes using transcriptome sequencing. The developed SNP markers will provide a useful source for molecular genetic studies, such as genetic diversity and characterization, high density quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis, association mapping and map-based gene cloning in the olive. High levels of genetic variation among Turkish olive genotypes revealed by SNPs, AFLPs and SSRs allowed us to characterize the Turkish olive genotype. © 2013 Kaya et al.


Kaya H.B.,Ege University | Cetin O.,Olive Research Station | Kaya H.S.,Olive Research Station | Sahin M.,Olive Research Station | And 2 more authors.
Biochemical Genetics | Year: 2016

Olive (Olea europaea L.) is one of the most important fruit trees especially in the Mediterranean countries due to high consumption of table olive and olive oil. In olive breeding, the phenotypic traits associated to fruit are the key factors that determine productivity. Association mapping has been used in some tree species and a lot of crop plant species, and here, we perform an initial effort to detect marker-trait associations in olive tree. In the current study, a total of 96 olive genotypes, including both oil and table olive genotypes from Turkish Olive GenBank Resources, were used to examine marker-trait associations. For olive genotyping, SNP, AFLP, and SSR marker data were selected from previously published study and association analysis was performed between these markers and 5 yield-related traits. Three different approaches were used to check for false-positive results in association tests, and association results obtained from these models were compared. Using the model utilizing both population structure and relative kinship, eleven associations were significant with FDR ≤ 0.05. The largest number of significant associations was detected for fruit weight and stone weight. Our results suggested that association mapping could be an effective approach for identifying marker-trait associations in olive genotypes, without the development of mapping populations. This study shows for the first time the use of association mapping for identifying molecular markers linked to important traits in olive tree. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


PubMed | Ege University and Olive Research Station
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biochemical genetics | Year: 2016

Olive (Olea europaea L.) is one of the most important fruit trees especially in the Mediterranean countries due to high consumption of table olive and olive oil. In olive breeding, the phenotypic traits associated to fruit are the key factors that determine productivity. Association mapping has been used in some tree species and a lot of crop plant species, and here, we perform an initial effort to detect marker-trait associations in olive tree. In the current study, a total of 96 olive genotypes, including both oil and table olive genotypes from Turkish Olive GenBank Resources, were used to examine marker-trait associations. For olive genotyping, SNP, AFLP, and SSR marker data were selected from previously published study and association analysis was performed between these markers and 5 yield-related traits. Three different approaches were used to check for false-positive results in association tests, and association results obtained from these models were compared. Using the model utilizing both population structure and relative kinship, eleven associations were significant with FDR0.05. The largest number of significant associations was detected for fruit weight and stone weight. Our results suggested that association mapping could be an effective approach for identifying marker-trait associations in olive genotypes, without the development of mapping populations. This study shows for the first time the use of association mapping for identifying molecular markers linked to important traits in olive tree.

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