Olds, Canada
Olds, Canada

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | June 20, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

OLDS, AB--(Marketwired - June 20, 2017) - Olds College and dmg :: events (Canada) inc. have partnered to bring a new and unique annual agriculture event and summer festival for Western Canada. FutureFarm Canada Expo is an exposition and festival focused on scientific advancements and innovations needed for tomorrow's agriculture businesses and future farm generations; while at the same time serves as an exciting new Alberta focused outdoor agricultural festival to kick off summer. The event will attract visitors from across Alberta, and over time develop into a leading international agricultural event based in Western Canada. The Expo, featuring more than 100 exhibiting companies, takes place July 6 - 8 at Olds College, and features the most cutting-edge products and services available to the industry; as well as providing fun for the entire family. Desiree Rattray, regional marketing manager for Farm Credit Canada, says an event like this gives farmers "meaningful exposure to a lot of different businesses and different opportunities to help them succeed and of course, their success is vital to our industry." "We help partner with our customers, and we are excited to be a part of this new event to bring the latest innovations to the forefront," says Rattray of the federal crown corporation, which is a financial institution advancing the business of agriculture in Canada through lending money to farmers and businesses related to the industry. Farm Credit Canada is a sponsor of the event and will showcase an exhibit as well. FutureFarm Canada Expo highlights smart agriculture technologies and practices through its educational workshops, presentations, and exhibits. It will offer companies a platform to demonstrate their newest technologies and showcase tomorrow's market-leading products in the outdoor exhibition. The show brings producers, suppliers, industry decision makers, private sector champions and government representatives together to develop and drive innovations for sustainable agriculture. The Expo features a Farm to Fork experience where attendees will be able to connect with companies and organizations focused on the entire food chain process. This featured area combines education about food production from the field to the dinner table with a showcase of local restaurants and chefs, food processors and producers of organic and sustainable agricultural products. Alex Villeneuve, of Ceres Solutions which is based in Olds, is excited about being an exhibitor at the Expo. The third-year apprentice chef and graduate of the brew master and brewery operations management program at Olds College, has created a company by taking spent grain from breweries in the province and growing oyster mushrooms and as a by-product of that he is also producing protein-enhanced livestock feed. "Since we're seeing this gigantic increase and expansion in the brewing industry right now, a lot of companies are either forced to throw it right in the garbage or they're forced to pay an exorbitant amount of money for composting companies to come in," says Villeneuve of the spent grain. Jack Stankievech, owner/manager of Trochu Motors, an agricultural dealership, also an exhibitor at the Expo, says the event is a new show the company wants to participate in. "We want to develop more business in that area. We're hoping to get a lot of exposure to some new products and some new salesmen that we have to get more people over that way. It's also to reconnect with some old customers," he says. Wes Carrington, sales manager in Olds of Noble Equipment, an agricultural equipment enterprise, says the company has locations in Olds, Nobleford and is opening a third location in Ponoka this summer and will have a booth at the Expo. "I think it gains exposure in the community. We are a new company and a growing company as well. It helps us in that aspect. It's nice to see a local show come up. So it's always nice to support the local event," says Carrington. Rick Erickson, territorial sales manager with Honey Bee Manufacturing based out of Frontier Sask., says the company will have a booth and a classroom during the event. "We're there to present our product so people can see the new AirFlex (header for combine) that we have built here in the last couple of years and we're promoting that for the future farmers. We're also having classrooms where we can invite farmers to learn more about the programming of their headers and combines," he says. Erickson says the Expo is important for farmers so they can learn more about the products out in the marketplace. In addition to seeing the latest equipment innovations available to farmers, there are free agri-business seminars, an agri-business exhibition, seed plot demonstrations, country life styles exhibit, three-days of live musical entertainment, Alberta craft brewers beer gardens, and Farm to Fork cooking demonstrations. FutureFarm Canada Expo registration is available online, and registrants are encouraged to book hotels and campsites as spots fill quickly. For more information, visit futurefarmexpo.com About Olds College Olds College is the premier Canadian integrated learning and applied research community specializing in agriculture, horticulture, land and environmental management. Olds College first opened its doors in 1913, and now includes programming that covers Animal Sciences, Horticulture, Land & Water, Fashion, Business, Hospitality & Tourism and Trades & Apprenticeships. For more information visit oldscollege.ca. About dmg :: events dmg :: events was founded in 1989 and now manages over 80 events in up to 25 countries each year. Headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, it is currently active in North America, the Middle East, North Africa, Europe, Asia, and Australia, employing over 300 staff. dmg :: events is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Daily Mail and General Trust plc, one of the largest media companies in the United Kingdom. DMGT's history dates back to 1896 when the Harmsworth brothers (Alfred and Harold) established the Daily Mail newspaper in the United Kingdom. For more event information, please visit FutureFarmExpo.com.


Harker K.N.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | O'Donovan J.T.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Blackshaw R.E.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Hall L.M.,University of Alberta | And 10 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Plant Science | Year: 2013

A field study was conducted at eight sites in western Canada to determine the influence of agronomic inputs on fatty acid profiles and biodiesel quality of canola. Protein and chlorophyll concentration and fatty acid profiles were determined from seed samples at all sites. Oil was extracted from canola seed samples from three sites, converted to biodiesel, and subjected to standard protocols. Protein concentration increased at higher than recommended rates of nitrogen (N) and the higher canola seeding rate (150 seeds m-2) reduced chlorophyll levels in canola oil. All biodiesel samples fell below new oxidation stability tolerance levels (minimum 8 h). However, given the routine addition of commercial antioxidant additives, all biodiesel samples from this study were suitable for blending in middle distillate fuels. Cloud point values were lowest at normal N (1×) rates. Normal N rates increased stearic acid content, whereas high N rates (1.5×) increased gadoleic acid content. Low seeding rates (75 seeds m-2) increased palmitic acid content. The combination of normal N (1×) with a high seed rate (150 seeds m-2) increased oleic acid content. Conversely, the combination of high N (1.5×) with a low seed rate (75 seeds m-2) increased linolenic acid content. Gadoleic acid content increased in the continuous canola rotation versus the canola-wheat-canola rotation; similar trends were observed with palmitic, linoleic, and linolenic acid. Oleic acid tended to be higher in canola rotated with wheat. Cold filter plugging point (CFPP) was predicted based on saturated fatty acid content. Usually, a high seeding rate (150 seeds m-2) combined with a normal N rate (1×) led to the most favourable (lowest) CFPP values. Low CFPP values were also associated with canola rotated with wheat compared with continuous canola production. Seeding rate, N, and crop rotation influenced protein and chlorophyll concentration, fatty acid profiles, cloud point, and CFPP.


Liu Y.,Low Carbon Technology | Lu H.,Low Carbon Technology | Ampong-Nyarko K.,Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development | MacDonald T.,Olds College | And 3 more authors.
Catalysis Today | Year: 2015

Biodiesel was produced by transesterification in the presence of trace sulfuric acid (0.02-0.1. wt% of oil mass). The kinetics for the transesterification of corn oil with ethanol was investigated between 155-195. °C. The transesterification in the pseudo-homogeneous system consisted of three consecutive steps. All steps were found to be second order reactions, with the first and the second steps being irreversible, while the third step was reversible. It was observed that the apparent rate constants of the forward reactions increased linearly with increasing acid concentration. Compared to the initial two steps of the ethanolysis reaction, the effect of the reversible transformation in the third step is significant, as the conversion of monoglyceride to glycerol is difficult. In addition, the presence of free fatty acids (<30. wt%), water (<3. wt%), and the use of stirring had little effect on the final content of biodiesel. Finally, it was observed that methanol exhibited a higher reactivity than ethanol in transesterification, while corn oil exhibited higher reactivity than Pennycress oil. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Liu Y.,Low Carbon Technology | Liu Y.,New York University | Lu H.,Low Carbon Technology | Lu H.,University of Sichuan | And 6 more authors.
Catalysis Today | Year: 2016

Biodiesel was produced by transesterification in the presence of trace sulfuric acid (0.02-0.1 wt% of oil mass). The kinetics for the transesterification of corn oil with ethanol was investigated between 155-195 °C. The transesterification in the pseudo-homogeneous system consisted of three consecutive steps. All steps were found to be second order reactions, with the first and the second steps being irreversible, while the third step was reversible. It was observed that the apparent rate constants of the forward reactions increased linearly with increasing acid concentration. Compared to the initial two steps of the ethanolysis reaction, the effect of the reversible transformation in the third step is significant, as the conversion of monoglyceride to glycerol is difficult. In addition, the presence of free fatty acids (<30 wt%), water (<3 wt%), and the use of stirring had little effect on the final content of biodiesel. Finally, it was observed that methanol exhibited a higher reactivity than ethanol in transesterification, while corn oil exhibited higher reactivity than Pennycress oil. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Sutton R.K.,UN Lincoln | Harrington J.A.,UW Madison 25 Agricultural Hall | Skabelund L.,Kansas State University | MacDonagh P.,Kestrel Design Group | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Green Building | Year: 2012

Native prairie species have been both promoted and questioned in their ability to serve as vegetative covers for green roofs. The green roof environment with its exposure to intense sun and wind and limited moisture restricts the capacity for a large diversity of species. The result has been, in many cases, a standard, low-diversity mix of Sedum species often focused on ornament and minimizes the potential for wider environmental benefits. We reviewed the ecological literature on prairie and grassland communities with specific reference to habitat templates from stressed environmental conditions and examined analogs of prairie-based vegetation on twenty-one existing green roofs. We found that many, but not all prairie and grassland species will survive and thrive on green roofs, especially when irrigated as needed or given adequate growing medium depth. We raise several important questions about media, irrigation, temperature, biodiversity and their interactions needing more study.


Meadus W.J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Duff P.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | McDonald T.,Olds College | Caine W.R.,Caine Research Consulting
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology | Year: 2014

Camelina sativa is an oil seed crop which can be grown on marginal lands. Camelina seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids (>35%) and γ-tocopherol but is also high in erucic acid and glucosinolates. Camelina meal, is the by-product after the oil has been extracted. Camelina meal was fed to 28 d old weaned pigs at 3.7% and 7.4% until age 56 d. The camelina meal supplements in the soy based diets, improved feed efficiency but also significantly increased the liver weights. Gene expression analyses of the livers, using intra-species microarrays, identified increased expression of phase 1 and phase 2 drug metabolism enzymes. The porcine versions of the enzymes were confirmed by real time PCR. Cytochrome 8b1 (CYP8B1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2), and thiosulfate transferase (TST) were all significantly stimulated. Collectively, these genes implicate the camelina glucosinolate metabolite, methyl-sulfinyldecyl isothiocyanate, as the main xeniobiotic, causing increased hepatic metabolism and increased liver weight. © 2014 Meadus et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Blackshaw R.E.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Johnson E.N.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Gan Y.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | May W.E.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | And 4 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Plant Science | Year: 2011

Increased demand for biodiesel feedstock has encouraged greater napus canola (Brassica napus L.) production, but there may be a need for greater production of other oilseed crops for this purpose. A multi-site field study was conducted to determine the oil yield potential of various crops relative to that of napus canola in the semi-arid, short-season environment of the Canadian prairies. Oilseed crops evaluated included rapa canola (Brassica rapa L.), juncea canola (Brassica juncea L.), Ethiopian mustard (Brassica carinata L.), oriental mustard (Brassica juncea L.), yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.), camelina (Camelina sativa L.), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Max.]. Crop emergence and growth were generally good for all crops, but soybean did not fully mature at some locations. The number of site-years (out of a total of 9) that crops attained similar or greater yields compared to napus canola were camelina (6), oriental mustard (5), juncea canola (3), flax (3), soybean (3), rapa canola (2), yellow mustard (2), and Ethiopian mustard (1). The ranking of seed oil concentration was napus canola=rapa canola=juncea canola-flax=camelina=oriental mustard>Ethiopian mustard>yellow mustard>soybean. Considering yield and oil concentration, the alternative oilseed crops exhibiting the most potential for biodiesel feedstock were camelina, flax, rapa canola and oriental mustard. Oils of all crops were easily converted to biodiesel and quality analyses indicated that all crops would be suitable for biodiesel feedstock with the addition of antioxidants that are routinely utilized in biodiesel fuels.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

OLDS, ALBERTA--(Marketwired - November 23, 2016) - dmg events (Canada) inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of DMGT (Daily Mail Group & Trust plc) and Olds College are partnering to develop and organize a new event for the agriculture industry. FutureFarm Canada Expo 2017 is a unique trade show focused on scientific advancements and innovations needed for tomorrow's agriculture businesses and future farm generations. The event will take place at Olds College on July 6 - 8, 2017, coinciding with the kick-off of the Calgary Stampede. The exhibition will focus on Canada's unique agricultural landscape and feature international companies demonstrating the most innovative products and services in the industry. FutureFarm Canada Expo is changing the model of current shows by attracting new to market exhibitors and international attendees. Olds College is the premier Canadian college for integrated learning and applied research specializing in agriculture. Event attendees will network, meet industry experts, enjoy onsite demonstrations and have the opportunity to participate in onsite courses offered by the College. The Expo site will be the same location that was used to host the highly successful 2013 World Plowing Championships. This show has come about as result of the fast changing nature of agriculture as it adjusts to production, profitability and environmental challenges. FutureFarm Canada Expo will be the show to see and learn about Smart Agriculture technologies and practices that are being implemented in response to these opportunities. "dmg events is thrilled to enter into a long term partnership with Olds College and have the opportunity to develop a world class event that fully represents the agriculture industry," said Wes Scott, Executive Vice President, dmg events. "In addition, we are excited to utilize our unmatched market reach to bring this unique event to Western Canada." Olds College is partnering with dmg events to host FutureFarm Canada Expo to capitalize on the opportunity to profile smart agriculture in Alberta. Tanya McDonald, Vice President, Advancement at Olds College says, "We have a unique ability, in collaboration with stakeholders in the agricultural industry, to demonstrate and showcase emerging technologies and innovation in an outdoor learning environment." For more event information, please visit FutureFarmExpo.com. dmg events is the name behind many of the largest events in the world, such as The Big 5 (Abu Dhabi, UAE); Global Petroleum Show (Calgary, Canada); The Hotel Show (Dubai, UAE); ADIPEC (Abu Dhabi, UAE); Index International Design Exhibition (Dubai,UAE); International Pipeline Exposition (Calgary, Canada); Heavy Oil Latin America Conference & Exhibition (Mexico); Oil Sands Trade Show & Conference (Fort McMurray, Canada); and Gastech (Japan). Headquartered in London, UK with offices in key locations including Calgary, Canada; Abu Dhabi, UAE; Houston, Texas; and Dallas, Texas; dmg events brings more than 100 years' experience in organizing exhibitions and conferences around the world. Olds College is the premier Canadian integrated learning and applied research community specializing in agriculture, horticulture, land and environmental management. Olds College first opened its doors in 1913, and now includes programming that covers Animal Sciences, Horticulture, Land & Water, Fashion, Business, Hospitality & Tourism and Trades & Apprenticeships.


Hamlin R.,University of Otago | Knight J.,University of Otago | Cuthbert R.,Olds College
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems | Year: 2015

In many developed countries agriculture is undergoing significant changes. Traditional commodity markets are increasingly being supplemented or even displaced by niche markets served by firms producing specialty products. The purpose of this paper is to determine why firms seek out niche markets and what contributes to their success. This paper investigates the characteristics that make niche markets attractive to small and medium-sized agricultural firms and the ways in which these firms become highly adapted for their chosen niche. Results indicate that forming alliances and the development of horizontal and vertical networks are among the most common and most important strategies employed by successful niche marketers. The study found that firms market niche products as part of a portfolio of products that often includes an anchoring commodity. Results also suggest that aggressive growth and pricing strategies may negatively impact a firm's ability to sustain barriers to entry. The development of a niche positioning strategy is often the outcome of a reaction to an existing situation rather than of a priori strategic planning. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015

Loading Olds College collaborators
Loading Olds College collaborators