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News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: phys.org

"I don't mean to be too forward, but the fate of the species literally depends on me," the rhino's profile says. "I perform well under pressure." The campaign called "The Most Eligible Bachelor in the World," by a Kenyan wildlife conservancy and the dating app, focuses on the rhino named Sudan. The 43-year-old and his last two female companions are unable to breed naturally because of issues that include old age. Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the app aim to raise $9 million for research into breeding methods, including in-vitro fertilization, in an effort to save the species from extinction. "We partnered with Ol Pejeta conservancy to give the most eligible bachelor in the world a chance to meet his match," said Matt David, head of communications and marketing at Tinder. "We are optimistic given Sudan's profile will be seen on Tinder in 190 countries and over 40 languages." The conservancy's website had crashed by Tuesday evening. Sudan lives at the conservancy, protected by guards around the clock, with the two females, Najin and Fatu. "The plight that currently faces the northern white rhinos is a signal to the impact that humankind is having on many thousands of other species across the planet," said Richard Vigne, the conservancy's chief executive officer. "Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized." Explore further: The last remaining male northern white rhino joins Tinder


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The last surviving male of the northern white rhino species is named Sudan and has joined Tinder on April 25 in hopes of becoming "the most eligible bachelor in the world." This is the title of the public awareness campaign aiming to raise the $9 million necessary for saving northern white rhinos from extinction. Like any other Tinder user, Sudan is looking for love and has now put his trust in global exposure to make his cause heard and hopefully help his species win the race against time. Perhaps the most endearing profile ever made on a dating app, Sudan's Tinder account stemmed from eager conservation efforts trying to prevent northern white rhinos from completely dying out. According to a Fauna and Flora International (FFI) news release, the campaign to save northern white rhinos was launched by Tinder in partnership with Ol Pejeta Conservancy, which houses the male rhinoceros. "The plight that currently faces the northern white rhinos is a signal to the impact that humankind is having on many thousands of other species across the planet," said Richard Vigne, CEO of Ol Pejeta Conservancy. The ultimate goal of this endeavor is "to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized," noted Vigne. To accomplish this, Ol Pejeta Conservancy is hoping to raise enough money to fund Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) currently researched by a consortium of institutions in the United States, Germany, and Japan. "Once perfected, this technology, in particular in vitro fertilization (IVF), will aid to achieve successful pregnancies to gradually build up a viable herd of northern white rhinos," shows the FFI news release. The research aims to establish a herd of 10 specimens through a five-year process of IVF and represents conservationists' last resort to save the species, after all previous attempts to breed northern white rhinos failed. If this feat ends in success, it will constitute a premiere in the artificial reproduction of rhinos. Upon hitting the "Like" button on Sudan's Tinder profile, people will be directed to the Ol Pejeta Conservancy website, where they can make donations to support the northern white rhino cause. Yesterday afternoon, the web page was temporarily down due to the large number of people trying to access it. "We partnered with Ol Pejeta conservancy to give the most eligible bachelor in the world a chance to meet his match," said Matt David, head of Tinder's communications and marketing department, who added that the company is confident that Sudan's profile will be visible on the app in 190 countries and more than 40 languages. In his Tinder profile, Sudan is described as "one of a kind" — and that's no exaggeration. He is in fact the last male white rhino on the entire planet. "I perform well under pressure. I like to eat grass and chill in the mud," reads Sudan's Tinder profile, mentioning the eligible bachelor is 6 feet tall and weighs 5,000 pounds. Sudan spends his days at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, protected by armed guards, and enjoying the company of two females of his species, Najin and Fatu. A series of challenges that include old age have kept these northern white rhinos from breeding naturally. Nevertheless, conservationists are weighing the option of crossing the species with Southern white rhinos. Although a distinct subspecies, they could provide around 17,000 potential female suitors for Sudan. The death of Suni, the other fertile male of the species in 2014 left Sudan, the only remaining male that can guarantee the proliferation of northern white rhinos. However, time is of the essence and all efforts must be made to ensure the species' survival while the rhino, aged 43, is still alive to fulfill his task. "To win this run against time it is very crucial to find major funds as quickly as possible," said Steven Seet, spokesperson for the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, which is part of the consortium. In 1960, there were more than 2,000 northern white rhinos living in the wild, according to World Wide Fund for Nature. By 1984, their numbers were decimated to just 15 due to poaching, since the rhinos' ivory horns were sold for big money in Asia. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

To fund in vitro fertilization research, Ol Pejeta Conservancy CEO Richard Vigne says researchers teamed up with the dating app Tinder to feature "Sudan" as the "Most Eligible Bachelor in the World."


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE In this Monday Dec. 21, 2009 file photo, Sudan, a northern white rhino, arrives at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. There's just one male northern white rhino left in the world, and he's getting some help from the Tinder dating app. A Kenyan wildlife conservancy is teaming up with Tinder for a campaign called "The Most Eligible Bachelor in the World," focusing on the rhino named Sudan. They are raising money for research to save the species from extinction. Sudan and his last two female companions are unable to breed naturally because of issues that include old age. (AP Photo/Riccardo Gangale, File) NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The world's last male northern white rhino has joined the Tinder dating app as wildlife experts make a last-chance breeding effort to keep his species alive. "I don't mean to be too forward, but the fate of the species literally depends on me," the rhino's profile says. "I perform well under pressure." The campaign called "The Most Eligible Bachelor in the World," by a Kenyan wildlife conservancy and the dating app, focuses on the rhino named Sudan. The 43-year-old and his last two female companions are unable to breed naturally because of issues that include old age. Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the app aim to raise $9 million for research into breeding methods, including in-vitro fertilization, in an effort to save the species from extinction. "We partnered with Ol Pejeta conservancy to give the most eligible bachelor in the world a chance to meet his match," said Matt David, head of communications and marketing at Tinder. "We are optimistic given Sudan's profile will be seen on Tinder in 190 countries and over 40 languages." The conservancy's website had crashed by Tuesday evening. Sudan lives at the conservancy, protected by guards around the clock, with the two females, Najin and Fatu. "The plight that currently faces the northern white rhinos is a signal to the impact that humankind is having on many thousands of other species across the planet," said Richard Vigne, the conservancy's chief executive officer. "Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized."


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

The last male northern white rhino on earth has joined the dating app Tinder - as part of fundraising efforts by conservationists to save the species. At 43 (or 100 in rhino years), Sudan is described as "one of a kind", who likes to eat grass and chill in the mud. Attempts to mate the animal - who lives in Kenya - with only two surviving females have failed. Conservationists say they need to raise $10m (£7.8m) to develop in vitro fertilisation (IVF) methods for rhinos. "It's never ever has been done in rhinos before," Richard Vigne, head of Ol Pejeta Conservancy, told the BBC. "This is a 10-year programme to recover that species. "We'll hopefully keep him alive as long as we can - but we are in a race against time if we are going to recover this species." On Tinder, Sudan's profile reads: "I don't mean to be too forward, but the fate of my species literally depends on me. "I perform well under pressure... 6ft (183cm) tall and 5,000lb (2,268kg) if it matters." In a joint campaign launched by Ol Pejeta Conservancy and Tinder, app users now have an option to donate when they open Sudan's profile. Scientists in several countries are currently testing how to use IVF techniques on the two northern white rhino females. They also do not rule out using Sudan's sperm for IVF with southern white rhinos - although they are a distinct species. Still the crossing option would be better than extinction, they say. Sudan - who is often described as "the most eligible bachelor in the world" - has his own team of armed bodyguards, who are protecting him around the clock. Countless TV shows have been made about the ageing animal. Northern whites are the only rhinos that can survive in the wild in central Africa. But they have been hunted into near extinction by poachers who target their horns.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

There's a new bachelor on the prowl on Tinder, and he's literally horny. Sudan, the last male northern white rhinoceros in the world, has a profile on the dating app as of Tuesday, thanks to Tinder's partnership with the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, the 90,000-acre reserve in Kenya's Laikipia region where Sudan is protected under armed guard, along with the last female northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu. Najin, born in 1989, is Sudan's daughter, and Fatu is his daughter with Najin, making her both Sudan's daughter and granddaughter. This shallow gene pool, combined with the females' infertility with older age and 44-year-old Sudan's low sperm count, has prompted conservationists to cast a wider dating net so he can save his critically endangered subspecies from total erasure. Over the past 40 years, northern white rhinos have been poached to extinction in the wild. Their horns are considered extremely valuable in Asian medicinal markets, and the demand has reduced the known world population to Sudan and his daughters. Captured at three years old, Sudan is the last northern white rhino born in the wild. Fortunately, however, southern white rhinos—the most abundant rhino subspecies on Earth—can interbreed with their northern brethren (northern and southern white rhinos are the two subspecies of the white rhino species, in case you want to get phylogenetic about it). There are around 20,000 southern white rhinos left in the wild, and around 17,000 females that could potentially carry Sudan's species-saving calf. As amazing as it would be to have Sudan swipe through all these eligible bachelorettes, Tinder and the Ol Pejeta Conservancy have another goal in mind for "The Most Eligible Bachelor in the World," as the campaign calls Sudan. The rhino's profile is designed to raise awareness and generate donations that can support research into assisted reproductive technologies, like in-vitro fertilization (IVF), that could leverage Sudan's ailing sperm into a bunch of adorable infant rhinos, with mothers that may never even meet their baby daddy. The goal is to raise nine million dollars for this cause. Read More: China's 'Tinder for Dancing Grannies' Is Sparking a Dance Revolution Scientists have never artificially inseminated rhinos before. "This represents the last option to save the species after all previous breeding attempts proved futile," said Richard Vigne, CEO of the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, in a statement. "Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild which is where their true value will be realized." Sudan's Tinder profile, linked to a donation prompt, is available in 190 countries and over 40 languages as of April 25. "I don't mean to be too forward," his bio reads, "but the fate of my species literally depends on me." It's a solid pickup line, and when followed up by "I like to eat grass and chill in the mud" and "5,000 lbs if it matters," Sudan seems downright charming. It was definitely a smart move not to lead with the whole "I had a daughter with my daughter" angle. Subscribe to Science Solved It , Motherboard's new show about the greatest mysteries that were solved by science.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The world's most eligible bachelor is coming to Tinder — and he may not be who you expect. In a new campaign launched Tuesday, Tinder has partnered with the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in central Kenya to introduce users to Sudan, the last known male northern white rhino in existence. The platform hopes to save Sudan's species from extinction. SEE ALSO: 9 incredible ways we're using drones for social good As the last hope for all northern white rhinos, 42-year-old Sudan is one of the most protected animals on the planet, surrounded by armed guards at all times. He lives at the conservancy with the only two female northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu. But he's been unable to breed with Najin and Fatu due to a number of issues, including old age and a low sperm count. Through Sudan's Tinder profile — complete with an adorable profile photo — Tinder and the Ol Pejeta Conservancy hope to raise a hefty $9 million to fund in-vitro efforts in lieu of natural breeding to save the northern white rhino. "As a platform that makes millions of meaningful connections every day, raising awareness about Sudan the Rhino and the importance of finding his match seemed like something we could support in a really impactful way," a Tinder spokesperson told Mashable. "We've heard countless stories about Tinder babies, but this would be the first match to save a species." Any users who see ads on Tinder could potentially see Sudan the Rhino in their card stack. When users swipe right on Sudan, they'll receive a message that features a link to donate, which would help fund ongoing research focusing on "assisted reproductive technologies." Scientists are currently testing ways to use in-vitro fertilization on Najin and Fatu, as well as female southern white rhinos with Sudan's stored sperm, hoping to achieve white rhino pregnancies to support population growth. Southern white rhinos aren't endangered, but they are a different subspecies from northern white rhinos. These offspring, then, wouldn't be 100 percent northern white rhino, but experts say that option is better than extinction. And there are currently 17,000 southern white rhinos in existence, meaning chances of success are much higher. White rhino populations around the globe have been severely threatened by poaching, with hundreds killed each year by illegal hunters. The animals are killed for their horns, which are traded illegally and used in traditional Asian medicines to treat a range of illnesses. They're particularly vulnerable to poaching because they're relatively unaggressive and travel in herds. If successful, this would be the first time scientists carry out artificial reproduction in rhinos. They hope to establish a herd of 10 northern white rhinos after five years.  "Saving the northern white rhinos is critical if we are to, one day, reintroduce rhinos back into Central Africa," said Richard Vigne, CEO of the Ol Pejeta Conservancy. "They contain unique genetic traits that confer upon them the ability to survive in this part of Africa. Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized." This isn't Tinder's first foray into supporting social good causes. Recently, the dating app let any user allocate $100 to a women-focused charity on International Women's Day. In 2014, the company partnered with Amnesty International to bring awareness to child and forced marriage around the globe through a series of in-app ads. WATCH: The last Sumatran rhino left the U.S. to save his species


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

World's last male northern white rhino gets help from Tinder (AP) — The world's last male northern white rhino has joined the Tinder dating app as wildlife experts make a last-chance breeding effort to keep his species alive. "I don't mean to be too forward, but the fate of the species literally depends on me," the rhino's profile says. "I perform well under pressure." The campaign called "The Most Eligible Bachelor in the World," by a Kenyan wildlife conservancy and the dating app, focuses on the rhino named Sudan. The 43-year-old and his last two female companions are unable to breed naturally because of issues that include old age. Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the app aim to raise $9 million for research into breeding methods, including in-vitro fertilization, in an effort to save the species from extinction. "We partnered with Ol Pejeta conservancy to give the most eligible bachelor in the world a chance to meet his match," said Matt David, head of communications and marketing at Tinder. "We are optimistic given Sudan's profile will be seen on Tinder in 190 countries and over 40 languages." The conservancy's website had crashed by Tuesday evening. Sudan lives at the conservancy, protected by guards around the clock, with the two females, Najin and Fatu. "The plight that currently faces the northern white rhinos is a signal to the impact that humankind is having on many thousands of other species across the planet," said Richard Vigne, the conservancy's chief executive officer. "Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized."


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

World's last male rhino getting help from Tinder dating app (AP) — The world's last male northern white rhino has joined the Tinder dating app as wildlife experts make a last-chance breeding effort to keep his species alive. "I don't mean to be too forward, but the fate of the species literally depends on me," the rhino's profile says. "I perform well under pressure." The campaign called "The Most Eligible Bachelor in the World," by a Kenyan wildlife conservancy and the dating app, focuses on the rhino named Sudan. The 43-year-old and his last two female companions are unable to breed naturally because of issues that include old age. Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the app aim to raise $9 million for research into breeding methods, including in-vitro fertilization, in an effort to save the species from extinction. "We partnered with Ol Pejeta conservancy to give the most eligible bachelor in the world a chance to meet his match," said Matt David, head of communications and marketing at Tinder. "We are optimistic given Sudan's profile will be seen on Tinder in 190 countries and over 40 languages." The conservancy's website had crashed by Tuesday evening. Sudan lives at the conservancy, protected by guards around the clock, with the two females, Najin and Fatu. "The plight that currently faces the northern white rhinos is a signal to the impact that humankind is having on many thousands of other species across the planet," said Richard Vigne, the conservancy's chief executive officer. "Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized."


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

He's big, smelly and a little past his prime, but should you happen to see a northern white rhinoceros named Sudan pop up on your Tinder, you might want to swipe right anyway. Sudan is the last male of the northern white rhinoceros subspecies (Ceratotherium simum simum). He's not on Tinder to find love — there are only two female northern white rhinoceroses left, and both live with Sudan at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. One, Najin, is too old to breed. The other, Fatu, has a uterine condition that renders her infertile. Instead, Sudan's Tinder debut is designed to garner donations for rhino-assisted reproduction. Swiping right will take users to a donation page with the goal of funding rhino in-vitro fertilization to save the northern white subspecies. [A Crash of Rhinos: See All 5 Species] The northern white rhino has been pushed to near-extinction by habitat loss and poaching. Rhino horn is used as a status symbol and in traditional Chinese medicine, despite it being mostly keratin, the same substance that makes up human hair and fingernails. The last northern white rhinos seen in the wild were a group of four that lived in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's Garamba National Park. They haven't been spotted since 2007 and are presumed dead. Political instability and war across the northern white's former territory have contributed to the difficulty of protecting these rare rhinos. Meanwhile, the few northern whites in captivity are aging and beginning to die off. In 2015, the Dvůr Králové Zoo in the Czech Republic lost Nabiré, a 31-year-old female, to a ruptured cyst. Just a few months later, the San Diego Zoo had to euthanize Nola, its 41-year-old female, due to a bacterial infection that resisted all treatment. Sudan is 43 years old, and conservationists and scientists are racing to help him breed before it's too late. Rhinoceros IVF currently does not exist, so scientists are trying to tweak horse IVF to make the process work; horses and rhinoceroses are related, so they may have similarities in their hormones and uterine environments. Zookeepers and veterinarians harvested sperm and eggs from the surviving northern white rhinoceroses, and have already banked tissues from those that have died. At the San Diego Zoo, researchers are even testing methods to turn regular body cells into stem cells, which they then hope to coax into becoming sperm and egg cells. "We could have a source of eggs that we could actually produce in the lab," Barbara Durrant, director of reproductive physiology at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, told Live Science in 2015. All these efforts cost money, so Ol Pejeta has partnered with Tinder and the communications agency Ogilvy & Mather for the dating-app effort. The goal is to raise $9 million to go toward assisted technology research in rhinoceroses. Though the two remaining northern white rhinoceros females are not healthy enough to carry pregnancies, researchers hope they can harvest their eggs, fertilize them and implant them in southern white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum cottoni), a closely related subspecies. "Financial support remains the biggest challenge to this project. At 43 years, Sudan does not have much longer to live," Steven Seet, a spokesman for Leibniz-IZW, part of the research consortium, said in a statement. "To win this run against time it is very crucial to find major funds as quickly as possible." During this process, Ol Pejeta must also pay for round-the-clock armed guards to protect Sudan, Najin and Fatu from poachers. Organized criminal gangs have become increasingly brazen in the hunt for rhino horn. In February, armed men stormed a rhinoceros orphanage in South Africa and killed two baby rhinos while holding the staff hostage. In March, poachers broke into a zoo in France and killed a southern white rhinoceros in its enclosure.

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