Ramsey, NJ, United States
Ramsey, NJ, United States

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Zuidema C.,Okonite Company | Kegerise W.,Okonite Company | Fleming R.,Kerite Company | Welker M.,ExxonMobil | Boggs S.,University of Connecticut
IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine | Year: 2011

Several synthetic alternatives to natural rubber have been developed for the use in the electrical insulation applications. The properties of polymers are the result of molecular composition and structure. Compositionally, ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) is a hydrocarbon, having an unsaturated carbon backbone, dominated by linear -CH2- and branched -CH- units, which are relatively stable and flexible building blocks for a polymer. The polymers that have a more random distribution of differing backbone units and/or branching points do not allow the polymer chains to organize very efficiently. Linear polymers that have only one type of backbone unit and no branching, such as found in some polyethylenes and polypropylenes, can organize much more easily. Their crystallinity leads to more rigid polymer networks, which is demonstrated by their physical properties such as high hardness, high modulus, and high tensile strength.


Cox P.,Memphis Light | Fleming R.,Kerite Company | Krajick F.,Okonite Company | Boggs S.,Nonlinear Systems Inc. | Cao Y.,University of Connecticut
IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine | Year: 2016

Many electric utilities, including Memphis Light, Gas & Water (MLGW), began installing underground residential electric (URD) facilities in the late 1960s. The earliest URD customers at MLGW were served by paper-insulated lead-covered (PILC) type cable which has a very good service history but was expensive and time-consuming to install. In an effort to install URD facilities at a comparable cost to traditional overhead facilities, direct buried high-molecular weight polyethylene (HMWPE) insulated cables were utilized. These unjacketed cables were constructed with a #2 AWG copper conductor, 6.1 mm (240 mils) of HMWPE insulation, and copper concentric neutrals. Unjacketed feeder cables were constructed with a 380 mm2 (750 kcmil) aluminum conductor, 6.1 mm (240 mils) of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulation, and copper concentric neutrals. Initially, feeder cables were direct buried but by the mid-1970s were installed in conduit. All cables were operated at either 12 kV or 23 kV phase-to-phase system voltages. © 2006 IEEE.


Zhang L.,University of Connecticut | Tian X.,University of Connecticut | Boggs S.A.,University of Connecticut | Bartolucci E.J.,Okonite Company
IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery | Year: 2011

An analytical approach is presented for estimating the total resistive loss in the randomly positioned conductors of a multiple circuit, three-phase cable system, as in a duct bank. By breaking the total resistive loss into three components, i.e., skin effect loss and two independent proximity effect losses, the problem is simplified so that each loss component can be computed separately. A semi-empirical formula for determining the proximity effect loss from a single external source current is established, which is the building block for solving the total proximity effect loss. For a typical three-phase duct bank scenario, the proposed approach achieves good agreement in predicting the total resistive loss when compared to finite-element analysis simulations. © 2011 IEEE.


Bartolucci E.J.,Okonite Company | Matto G.R.,Okonite Company
IEEE Conference Record of Annual Pulp and Paper Industry Technical Conference | Year: 2011

Continuously welded corrugated (CWC) armored type cables, UL designated as Type MC-HL are being specified and used in all types of industrial, commercial, and utility installations. They supply plant electrical power, and distribute power to motors, pumps, fans, and other equipment. A large percentage of these cables are extensively used in the petrochemical industry. Its use has become so wide spread that the National Electrical Code (NEC) has permitted its use in a variety of code articles. This paper will review the various advantages and uses, code articles, and the proper methods used when installing CWC armored cable. © 2011 IEEE.


Bartolucci E.J.,Okonite Company | Schiro Jr. C.S.,Marathon Petroleum
Record of Conference Papers - Annual Petroleum and Chemical Industry Conference | Year: 2010

Continuously corrugated welded (CCW) armored type cables, UL designated as Type MC-HL are being specified and used in all types of oil and gas, industrial, commercial, utility, installations to supply electrical power to motors, pumps, fans, and other equipment. A large percentage of these cables are extensively used in the petrochemical industry. Its use has become so wide spread that the National Electrical Code (NEC) has permitted its use in a variety of code articles. This paper will review the various advantages and uses, code articles, and the proper methods used when installing CCW armored cable. ©2010 IEEE.


Bartolucci E.J.,Okonite Company | Thiele M.,Okonite Company
IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications | Year: 2016

It has been more than 20 years since the newer cable field-testing methods of very low frequency (VLF), tan delta, and field partial discharge testing were introduced to the field-testing arena. Over time, these technologies have matured, spawned a new testing industry, IEEE standards, technical committees, and a plethora of technical papers. How has this affected the cable manufacturer and what is its perspective on this area of field testing both as an acceptance and maintenance test method? This paper intends to discuss the guidelines established and some of the shortcomings that have been found. Although this paper may review the various standards and testing methods, its focus will be with the VLF test. © 1972-2012 IEEE.


Bartolucci E.J.B.,Okonite Company | Matto G.R.,Okonite Company
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2013

Continuously Welded Corrugated (CWC) Armored Cables, classified by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) as a metal-clad (MC) hazardous location (HL) type, are being specified and used in all types of industrial, commercial, and utility installations. They supply plant electrical power and distribute power to motors, pumps, fans, and other equipment. A large percentage of these cables are extensively used in the petrochemical industry. Their use has become so widespread that the National Electrical Code (NEC) has permitted their use in a variety of code articles. In this article, we will review the various advantages and uses, the code articles, and the proper installation methods for CWC armored cables. © 2013 IEEE.

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