Ohio Willow Wood Company

Lake Darby, OH, United States

Ohio Willow Wood Company

Lake Darby, OH, United States
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Rink C.,Ohio State University | Wernke M.M.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Powell H.M.,Ohio State University | Gynawali S.,Ohio State University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development | Year: 2016

—A growing number of clinical trials and case reports support qualitative claims that use of an elevated vacuum suspension (EVS) prosthesis improves residual-limb health on the basis of self-reported questionnaires, clinical outcomes scales, and wound closure studies. Here, we report first efforts to quantitatively assess residual-limb circulation in response to EVS. Residual-limb skin health and perfusion of people with lower-limb amputation (N = 10) were assessed during a randomized crossover study comparing EVS with nonelevated vacuum suspension (control) over a 32 wk period using noninvasive probes (transepidermal water loss, laser speckle imaging, transcutaneous oxygen measurement) and functional hyperspectral imaging approaches. Regardless of the suspension system, prosthesis donning decreased perfusion in the residual limb under resting conditions. After 16 wk of use, EVS improved residual-limb oxygenation during treadmill walking. Likewise, prosthesis-induced reactive hyperemia was attenuated with EVS following 16 wk of use. Skin barrier function was preserved with EVS but disrupted after control socket use. Taken together, outcomes suggest chronic EVS use improves perfusion and preserves skin barrier function in people with lower-limb amputation. © 2016, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service. All rights reserved.


Gerschutz M.J.,Trine University | Hayne M.L.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Colvin J.M.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Denune J.A.,Ohio Willow Wood Company
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics | Year: 2015

Introduction: The functional purpose of lower-limb prosthetic suspension systems is to adhere the prosthesis to the residual limb of the individual with amputation. Elevated vacuum suspension, a recent advancement in suspension systems, creates subatmospheric pressure between the prosthetic socket and the interface material. This form of suspension has clinically demonstrated superior prosthetic linkage. The purpose of this study was to dynamically evaluate distal displacement for vacuum and suction suspension. Vacuumwas assessed at three different levels (8 in Hg, 14 in Hg, and 20 in Hg). In addition, the relationship between distal displacement and vacuum pressure fluctuations was compared. Materials and Methods: For five subjects with transfemoral amputation, an inductive sensor was used to measure the distal displacement during ambulation. Simultaneous vacuum pressure responses were collected for comparison. Results: The average distal displacement was 2.65 (1.21)mmfor suction suspension, 0.80 (0.40)mmfor vacuumat 8 in Hg, 0.21 (0.15) mm for vacuum at 14 in Hg, and 0.05 (0.04) mm for vacuum at 20 in Hg. Direct correlations were also determined between fluctuations in vacuum pressure and the amount of distal displacement providing insight regarding the dynamics within a vacuum suspended prosthetic socket. Conclusions: Vacuum suspension significantly reduced the amount of vertical displacement compared with suction displacement, and a linear correlation was determined between pressure fluctuations and distal displacement with vacuum suspension. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists.


Wernke M.M.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Schroeder R.M.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Kelley C.T.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Denune J.A.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Colvin J.M.,Ohio Willow Wood Company
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics | Year: 2015

Introduction: Common materials used for prosthetic liners and sockets have poor thermal properties, thus insulating the residual limb resulting in thermal discomfort and increased perspiration. The purpose of this work is to compare the temperature increase and amount of perspiration between traditional silicone liners and the SmartTemp liner, which incorporates phase change material to improve the thermal properties and mitigate perspiration. Materials and Methods: Sixteen individuals with transtibial amputations participated in a double-blind, randomized clinical trial. Participants were asked to cycle on a stationary bike for 25 minutes followed by a 10-minute rest period. This activity was completed once for each treatment with a 1-hour rest period between treatments. Temperature and perspiration data were collected as outcomes, and a paired 1-way Student t-test was used to compare the data. Results: The SmartTemp liner resulted in significantly reduced mean skin temperature and perspiration during the activity and postactivity periods when compared with the placebo liner. Conclusions: Use of the SmartTemp liner can positively impact the internal socket conditions. Reducing temperature andmoisture within the socket can improve comfort and suspension, and reduce the risk of skin injury for persons with amputation who use a prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists.


Gerschutz M.J.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Haynes M.L.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Colvin J.M.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Nixon D.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics | Year: 2010

The use of vacuum suspension (VS) in the prosthetic field has increased dramatically. However, knowledge regarding the mechanics of VS, the loading responses on the soft tissue, the short-term effects on perfusion, and the long-term effects on the residual limb are limited. In addition, little is known about what level of vacuum should be considered sufficient. Currently, there are no tools available to monitor the vacuum in a socket, how it varies with time, or the actual patient usage. This article presents a tool, the LimbLogic VS Communicator (The Ohio Willow Wood Company, Mt. Sterling, OH), that allows these types of studies to be performed in a nonintrusive manner, with the intent of facilitating the understanding and appropriate usage of VS systems. In this article, the accuracy of the LimbLogic VS Communicator is verified to the same standards as the LimbLogic VS System (accuracy: ±1 in Hg [±3.39 kPa]). The average accuracy of the LimbLogic VS Communicator, which is dependent on the VS pressure setting, is determined to be ±0.5 in Hg (±1.69 kPa). In addition, a study on the distribution of vacuum levels in a socket is presented. This VS measurement tool may simplify many possible future experiments in the prosthetic field. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists.


Gerschutz M.J.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Denune J.A.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Colvin J.M.,Ohio Willow Wood Company | Schober G.,Ohio Willow Wood Company
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics | Year: 2010

Lower limb amputees continue to contend with residual limb volume fluctuations. The stabilization of residual limb volume has the ability to increase comfort, reduce tissue breakdown, and improve daily function. Clinical evidence on elevated vacuum suspension has demonstrated the potential to maintain residual limb volume; however, the effect of different vacuum pressure settings has not been quantified. The purpose of this research is to gain outcome knowledge regarding elevated vacuum suspension and to investigate the effects of different vacuum pressure settings on lower limb amputee's residual limb volume. This single subject study focused on a K2 transtibial amputee new to elevated vacuum suspension with a history of residual limb volume fluctuations. The patient was fitted with a 0-ply total surface bearing socket that used the LimbLogic® VS. The percent change in volume was measured using the OMEGA® Tracer® volume feature at three treatment levels: absence of elevated vacuum (suction), vacuum (negative pressure) at 10 in Hg, and vacuum (negative pressure) at 15 in Hg. The results indicated a significantly less volume fluctuation with vacuum (0.8%) compared with suction (4.9%). Vacuum settings at 10 and 15 in Hg generated similar absolute percent changes in volume; however, 15 in Hg demonstrated a decreasing rate of change potentially suggesting a physiological alteration in the residual limb. During the duration of the study (3.5 months), an improvement was seen in volume retention with the length of vacuum suspension usage. In addition, the progressive healing of a distal wound was observed. As lower limb amputees continue to contend with residual limb volume fluctuations, it is important to understand the benefits the elevated vacuum can provide. Future research is necessary to investigate any physiological changes to the residual limb because of vacuum pressure settings. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists.


Patent
Ohio Willow Wood Company | Date: 2016-10-05

Evacuation devices for evacuating the socket of a prosthetic limb, and prosthetic limb systems employing such vacuum devices. The evacuation devices each preferably include at least an electrically powered vacuum pump and a power source. Such evacuation devices can be attached at various locations on or in a prosthetic limb. Because the electrically powered pump does not require manual manipulation to create vacuum, it is substantially easier to use than a manual pump. Due to the small size and small power source required by such an electrically powered pump, an evacuation device may be readily incorporated into a prosthesis.

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