Delaware, OH, United States

Ohio Wesleyan University

www.owu.edu
Delaware, OH, United States

Ohio Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college in Delaware, Ohio, United States. It was founded in 1842 by Methodist leaders and Central Ohio residents as a nonsectarian institution, and is a member of the Ohio Five — a consortium of Ohio liberal arts colleges. Ohio Wesleyan has always admitted students irrespective of religion or race and maintained that the university "is forever to be conducted on the most liberal principles. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Keen to promote agrarian revolution in space to ensure food sufficiency for astronauts on space missions, NASA has stepped up efforts to grow more plants and vegetables outside the Earth. The sense of urgency is spawned by the upcoming space missions including a Mars mission. The advantage of an accelerated food cultivation program will be keeping the astronauts healthy and inducing more self-sufficiency in food than bringing supplies from Earth. In the latest supplies payload sent to the International Space Station, the Advanced Plant Habitat or APH experiment stands out as a prominent plant and vegetable cultivation program. Unlike previous projects, APH is seeing more volume and faster production of vegetables at the space station and aims to increase the share of food of space crew. NASA's priority to raise plants in cosmic conditions has certainly moved to the next level. NASA has dovetailed the human mission to Mars with a plan for developing a reliable food supply to sustain the crew for longer periods on the Red Planet. Programs like APH are preparing the ground for growing vegetables outside the environment of Earth, noted Chris Wolverton, a professor of botany at Ohio Wesleyan University. "In the near-term, most experts expect astronauts will take the food they need for basic sustenance with them from the Earth," said Wolverton who studies plant gravity with the backing of NASA. The choice of leafy vegetables is unmistakable as they have been good at absorbing chemical elements and in producing vitamins to keep the crew healthy. In fact, APH is an offshoot of NASA's own initiative Vegetable Production System, called Veggie, launched in 2015. The Veggie program managed to produce lettuce successfully at the ISS as NASA's first food grown in space and which fed the astronauts. However, APH differs from Veggies with its subdued reliance on enclosed plants while the latter was processing more unfiltered air inside the station. The APH gives astronauts greater control of the growing chamber's environment as it is backed by many LEDs that emit white and infrared light to increase the output. "It's really a way for the scientists to modify the environment: the light, the water, the atmosphere," said program manager Bryan Onate. The harvest of red romaine lettuce at the ISS in August 2015 was the culmination of efforts that involved simulation of the Martian soil to grow vegetables in near-zero gravity conditions. Yet another experiment at Wageningen University showed that 10 crops can be grown on soil at conditions resembling Mars. The crops include pea, tomato, leek, rye, radish, spinach, garden rocket, cress, quinoa, and chives. Meanwhile, potato has emerged as the best candidate for a possible crop that can be planted on Mars. This is because potato can thrive in harsh environments and deliver 10 percent of caloric needs of a person. Collaboration is at work between scientists from the International Potato Center in Peru, NASA, and engineers at the University of Engineering and Technology in Lima for conducting advanced experiments in growing nutrient-rich spuds at Mars-like conditions. Compared with Earth, Mars gets less sunlight. Therefore, temperature and pressure are lower than that on Earth. Many variants of potatoes are under test for zeroing in on the best that can brave Martian conditions. That will help future astronauts to Mars to skip the effort at building warmer conditions equivalent to Earth. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


ROCKVILLE, Md.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--John C. Landon, Ph.D., founded BIOQUAL in 1982. He led BIOQUAL for more than 30 years as President and Chief Executive Officer and grew BIOQUAL to become a $20M+ life sciences corporation. He retired as Chief Executive Officer on June 13, 2013, and was succeeded by Dr. Mark G. Lewis, BIOQUAL’s President. Dr. Landon remained as Chairman of the Board of Directors. Effective April 19, 2017, Dr. Landon retired as Chairman of the Board of Directors and as a member of the Board of Directors. Dr. Lewis, was appointed to succeed Dr. Landon as Chairman of the Board. Also on April 19, 2017, the Board of Directors elected David B. Landon, Ph.D., to fill the vacancy on the Board of Directors resulting from the retirement of Dr. John C. Landon. Dr. Lewis joined BIOQUAL as Senior Scientist in August 2003. He became the Executive Vice President in October 2008, and served in that capacity until he became President in 2010. Dr. Lewis, 62, received his B.A. (1977) degree from Ohio Wesleyan University and his Masters (1980) and Ph.D. (1983) degrees from Ohio State University, Department of Veterinary Pathology. He performed his post-doctoral studies (1983-1984) in the OSU Department of Pharmacology, and continued at OSU as a Research Associate until 1988. From 1988-1991, he was a Staff Virologist at the Southern Research Institute, Frederick, Maryland. From 1991 to 1998, he was a Principal Scientist for the Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Rockville, Maryland. In 1999, Dr. Lewis rejoined the Southern Research Institute as a Staff Scientist, and in 2002 was appointed Acting Director, Senior Scientist. Since joining BIOQUAL in 2003, Dr. Lewis has been the primary driver of BIOQUAL’s growth in the area of viral infectious diseases and has attracted to BIOQUAL several new commercial and government clients. He led the Company in its acquisition of the in-vivo animal model services -related assets from, and entry into a Strategic Teaming Agreement with Advanced Bioscience Laboratories, Inc. (ABL) in 2014. Dr. David Landon was appointed in 2003 as the Associate Director of the Andrew Fiske Memorial Center for Archaeological Research and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Massachusetts Boston, having served as a Senior Scientist in the Fiske Center from 2000 to 2002. He received his Ph.D. in 1991 from Boston University, and his B.A. in Economics in 1985 from Wesleyan University. He was an Associate Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University; a Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution in 1997-98; and Assistant Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University in 1991-97. He has published in more than a dozen journals and has received funding for projects supported by the National Science Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, Smithsonian, and other government and private sources. In his capacity as the Associate Director of the Fiske Center for Archaeological Research Dr. David Landon has primary responsibility for financial oversight of the Center’s expenditures, including research project budgets and the disbursements from the Center’s endowment. Dr. David Landon is 54 years old, and is a son of BIOQUAL’s founder, John C. Landon. He will be compensated at the same rate that the other BIOQUAL directors are compensated, currently $4,500 per quarter and $1,500 per meeting. Statements herein that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking and subject to risk and uncertainties. Actual results could differ materially from those currently anticipated due to a number of factors including risks relating to the ability to continue to extend current government contracts and obtain new contracts; the Company’s ability to obtain new commercial contracts; the performance of the business acquired in the ABL acquisition; the Company’s ability to perform under its contracts in accordance with the requirements of the contracts; the actual cost incurred in performing its contracts and the Company’s ability to manage its costs; dependence on third parties; future capital needs; the ability to fund its capital needs through the use of its cash on hand and line of credit; and the future availability and cost of financing/capital sources to the Company.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Male birds that have already paired up with a female aren't above looking for a little action on the side. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances explores how male juncos adjust their courtship behavior to their social landscape, finding that while both paired and unpaired males will try to get the attention of a new female on their turf, they go about it in different ways. A male bird's courtship behavior can be affected by factors like his size and hormone levels, but ornithologists are increasingly realizing that social context -- whether or not the male already has a mate, and what other birds are around to witness his exploits -- also plays a role. Dustin Reichard of Ohio Wesleyan University (formerly Indiana University) and his colleagues set out to tease apart the roles these different issues play in the courtship of Dark-eyed Juncos, comparing how unpaired males, paired males whose mates were present, and paired males whose mates were elsewhere behaved when presented with a new female. They found that paired males approached females more rapidly, spent more time close to the females, were more active, and spent more time with their body feathers erect than unpaired males. Paired males also sang fewer long-range songs than their single counterparts, perhaps not wanting other birds to overhear, although the actual presence or absence of their mates didn't affect their behavior. Reichard had noticed variation in male juncos' behavior during previous work to record their courtship songs, which led him to start developing hypotheses about what might underlie those differences. "Our results highlight the importance of considering both intrinsic and extrinsic factors when investigating the causes of variation in male courtship behavior," says Reichard. "The focus of the field has generally been intrinsic factors, such as male condition or circulating hormone levels, but our results suggest a potential role for eavesdroppers and social context in addition to condition-dependent factors." Reichard and his colleagues conducted their experiments at Mountain Lake Biological Station in Virginia, placing caged female juncos in front of free-living males and observing the males' reactions. After each trial, the researchers captured the male to record his size and weight and take a blood sample. "Often the male's mate would respond aggressively to the caged female, diving at the cage while pausing occasionally to chase her mate away from the area. The males were usually shameless during this process and continued to approach while singing and displaying, but to our knowledge none of the pairs in our study divorced as a result of this brief infidelity," says Reichard. "People called me a 'junco homewrecker' during these experiments, but there's little evidence to support that accusation." In the future, Reichard hopes to explore the possibility that males use different strategies to target potential social mates -- females they'll raise chicks with -- versus "extrapair" mates. According to Auburn University's Geoffrey Hill, an expert on mate choice in birds who was not involved in the research, "This study shows the potential for extremely complex behavioral interactions in birds that were long thought to be bland monogamists."


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Male birds that have already paired up with a female aren't above looking for a little action on the side. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances explores how male juncos adjust their courtship behavior to their social landscape, finding that while both paired and unpaired males will try to get the attention of a new female on their turf, they go about it in different ways. A male bird's courtship behavior can be affected by factors like his size and hormone levels, but ornithologists are increasingly realizing that social context--whether or not the male already has a mate, and what other birds are around to witness his exploits--also plays a role. Dustin Reichard of Ohio Wesleyan University (formerly Indiana University) and his colleagues set out to tease apart the roles these different issues play in the courtship of Dark-eyed Juncos, comparing how unpaired males, paired males whose mates were present, and paired males whose mates were elsewhere behaved when presented with a new female. They found that paired males approached females more rapidly, spent more time close to the females, were more active, and spent more time with their body feathers erect than unpaired males. Paired males also sang fewer long-range songs than their single counterparts, perhaps not wanting other birds to overhear, although the actual presence or absence of their mates didn't affect their behavior. Reichard had noticed variation in male juncos' behavior during previous work to record their courtship songs, which led him to start developing hypotheses about what might underlie those differences. "Our results highlight the importance of considering both intrinsic and extrinsic factors when investigating the causes of variation in male courtship behavior," says Reichard. "The focus of the field has generally been intrinsic factors, such as male condition or circulating hormone levels, but our results suggest a potential role for eavesdroppers and social context in addition to condition-dependent factors." Reichard and his colleagues conducted their experiments at Mountain Lake Biological Station in Virginia, placing caged female juncos in front of free-living males and observing the males' reactions. After each trial, the researchers captured the male to record his size and weight and take a blood sample. "Often the male's mate would respond aggressively to the caged female, diving at the cage while pausing occasionally to chase her mate away from the area. The males were usually shameless during this process and continued to approach while singing and displaying, but to our knowledge none of the pairs in our study divorced as a result of this brief infidelity," says Reichard. "People called me a 'junco homewrecker' during these experiments, but there's little evidence to support that accusation." In the future, Reichard hopes to explore the possibility that males use different strategies to target potential social mates--females they'll raise chicks with--versus "extrapair" mates. According to Auburn University's Geoffrey Hill, an expert on mate choice in birds who was not involved in the research, "This study shows the potential for extremely complex behavioral interactions in birds that were long thought to be bland monogamists." "Condition- and context-dependent factors are related to courtship behavior of paired and unpaired males in a socially monogamous songbird" will be available May 17, 2017, at http://americanornithologypubs. (issue URL http://americanornithologypubs. ). About the journal: The Auk: Ornithological Advances is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology that began in 1884 as the official publication of the American Ornithologists' Union, which merged with the Cooper Ornithological Society in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. In 2009, The Auk was honored as one of the 100 most influential journals of biology and medicine over the past 100 years.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: phys.org

A male junco reacts to the site of a caged female. Credit: J. Welklin Male birds that have already paired up with a female aren't above looking for a little action on the side. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances explores how male juncos adjust their courtship behavior to their social landscape, finding that while both paired and unpaired males will try to get the attention of a new female on their turf, they go about it in different ways. A male bird's courtship behavior can be affected by factors like his size and hormone levels, but ornithologists are increasingly realizing that social context—whether or not the male already has a mate, and what other birds are around to witness his exploits—also plays a role. Dustin Reichard of Ohio Wesleyan University (formerly Indiana University) and his colleagues set out to tease apart the roles these different issues play in the courtship of Dark-eyed Juncos, comparing how unpaired males, paired males whose mates were present, and paired males whose mates were elsewhere behaved when presented with a new female. They found that paired males approached females more rapidly, spent more time close to the females, were more active, and spent more time with their body feathers erect than unpaired males. Paired males also sang fewer long-range songs than their single counterparts, perhaps not wanting other birds to overhear, although the actual presence or absence of their mates didn't affect their behavior. Reichard had noticed variation in male juncos' behavior during previous work to record their courtship songs, which led him to start developing hypotheses about what might underlie those differences. "Our results highlight the importance of considering both intrinsic and extrinsic factors when investigating the causes of variation in male courtship behavior," says Reichard. "The focus of the field has generally been intrinsic factors, such as male condition or circulating hormone levels, but our results suggest a potential role for eavesdroppers and social context in addition to condition-dependent factors." Reichard and his colleagues conducted their experiments at Mountain Lake Biological Station in Virginia, placing caged female juncos in front of free-living males and observing the males' reactions. After each trial, the researchers captured the male to record his size and weight and take a blood sample. "Often the male's mate would respond aggressively to the caged female, diving at the cage while pausing occasionally to chase her mate away from the area. The males were usually shameless during this process and continued to approach while singing and displaying, but to our knowledge none of the pairs in our study divorced as a result of this brief infidelity," says Reichard. "People called me a 'junco homewrecker' during these experiments, but there's little evidence to support that accusation." In the future, Reichard hopes to explore the possibility that males use different strategies to target potential social mates—females they'll raise chicks with—versus "extrapair" mates. According to Auburn University's Geoffrey Hill, an expert on mate choice in birds who was not involved in the research, "This study shows the potential for extremely complex behavioral interactions in birds that were long thought to be bland monogamists." Explore further: Drosophila buzzatii fruit fly females may use courtship songs to pick same-species mates More information: "Condition- and context-dependent factors are related to courtship behavior of paired and unpaired males in a socially monogamous songbird" will be available May 17, 2017, at americanornithologypubs.org/doi/full/10.1642/AUK-16-214.1


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of the best colleges and universities in Ohio for 2017. 50 four-year schools were ranked, with Ursuline College, Xavier University, Ohio Northern University, Case Western Reserve University and John Carroll University coming in as the top five. Of the 29 two-year schools that also made the cut, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, Belmont College, Sinclair College, Owens Community College and Columbus State Community College were in the top five. A complete list of schools is included below. “Earning a certificate or degree can be a major stepping stone for career development,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “These schools offer more than just educational opportunities, they represent Ohio’s best combination of education and employment resources that translate to strong post-college earnings for students.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Ohio” list, institutions must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit schools. Each college is also ranked on metrics like the variety of degree programs offered, the number of employment and academic resources offered, financial aid availability, graduation rates and annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Ohio” list, visit: http://www.learnhowtobecome.org/college/ohio/ Ohio’s Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Ashland University Baldwin Wallace University Bluffton University Bowling Green State University-Main Campus Capital University Case Western Reserve University Cedarville University Cleveland Institute of Art Cleveland State University Defiance College Denison University Franciscan University of Steubenville Franklin University Heidelberg University Hiram College John Carroll University Kent State University at Kent Kenyon College Lake Erie College Lourdes University Malone University Marietta College Miami University-Oxford Mount Saint Joseph University Mount Vernon Nazarene University Muskingum University Notre Dame College Oberlin College Ohio Dominican University Ohio Northern University Ohio State University-Main Campus Ohio State University-Mansfield Campus Ohio University-Main Campus Ohio Wesleyan University Otterbein University The College of Wooster The University of Findlay Union Institute & University University of Akron Main Campus University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Dayton University of Mount Union University of Toledo Ursuline College Walsh University Wilberforce University Wittenberg University Wright State University-Main Campus Xavier University Youngstown State University Ohio’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Belmont College Bowling Green State University-Firelands Central Ohio Technical College Choffin Career and Technical Center Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Clark State Community College Columbiana County Career and Technical Center Columbus State Community College Cuyahoga Community College Eastern Gateway Community College Edison State Community College Hocking College Lakeland Community College Lorain County Community College Marion Technical College North Central State College Northwest State Community College Ohio Institute of Allied Health Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute Owens Community College Remington College-Cleveland Campus Rhodes State College Sinclair College Southern State Community College Stark State College Terra State Community College University of Akron Wayne College Washington State Community College Zane State College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.

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