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Sharma N.S.,University of Alabama at Birmingham | Hartwig M.G.,Duke University | Hayes D.,The Ohio State University
Annals of Translational Medicine | Year: 2017

Evolution in technology has resulted in rapid increase in utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to recovery and/or transplantation. Although there is limited evidence for the use of ECMO, recent improvements in ECMO technology, personnel training, ambulatory practices on ECMO and lung protective strategies have resulted in improved outcomes in patients bridged to lung transplantation. This review provides an insight into the current outcomes and best practices for utilization of ECMO in the pre- and post-lung transplantation period. © Annals of Translational Medicine. All rights reserved.


Pan J.,Ohio State University | Durand M.T.,Ohio State University | Vander Jagt B.J.,Ohio State University | Liu D.,The Ohio State University
Remote Sensing of Environment | Year: 2017

Recent applications of passive microwave remote sensing techniques to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE) increasingly rely on the comprehension of microwave emission theories, instead of traditional empirical fitting approaches. In this study, an advanced SWE retrieval algorithm based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method was developed. This method samples the posterior multiple-layer snow properties according to the likelihood of the brightness temperature (TB) simulation with the actual TB observations. The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks with improved Born approximation (MEMLS-IBA) was used as the observation model. Using a globally applicable method to produce prior estimates of snow properties, the retrieval approach is called the Bayesian Algorithm for SWE Estimation with Passive Microwave measurements (BASE-PM), and was applied on 48 snowpits at Sodankylä, Finland; Churchill, Canada and Colorado, US. The result shows that the root mean squared (RMS) error of the retrieved SWE is 42.7 mm excluding two outliers, and is 30.8 mm if the outliers as well as six deep snowpits from Colorado are excluded. This accuracy approximately meets the 30-mm requirement of Integrated Global Observing Strategy for shallow snow. The poor performance for the outlier and deep snowpits is explained. Additional experiments using more accurate priors show that SWE retrieval accuracy can be improved with local snowcover knowledge, e.g. if historical snowpit measurements or snow process model simulations are available. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Zheng W.,The Ohio State University | Kim S.H.,The Ohio State University
Journal of Power Sources | Year: 2017

A new method to accelerate pore-scale simulation of porous electrodes is presented. The method combines the macroscopic approach with pore-scale simulation by decomposing a physical quantity into macroscopic and local variations. The multiscale method is applied to the potential equation in pore-scale simulation of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) catalyst layer, and validated with the conventional approach for pore-scale simulation. Results show that the multiscale scheme substantially reduces the computational cost without sacrificing accuracy. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Nahar S.N.,The Ohio State University | Hernandez E.M.,Autonomous University of the State of Morelos | Hernandez L.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Antillon A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer | Year: 2017

An experimental and theoretical study of the single photoionization cross section of the P+ cation of phosphorus is presented. Photoionization (PI) cross sections are instrumental for the determination of abundances in the interstellar medium. The experiment was performed by merging an ion beam with a photon beam. The photon beam was nearly monochromatic and had an energy resolution of 24 meV. Calculations were carried out using the Breit–Pauli R-matrix method. The combined study was developed in the photon energy interval from 18 eV (68.9 nm) to 50 eV (24.8 nm). Comparison between the measured and the calculated cross section shows good agreement in general and identifies features of the process and existence of states in the experimental beam. The present results should provide for more accurate modeling of P+. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Das P.,The Ohio State University | Mitra R.N.,University of Cincinnati
Foundations and Frontiers in Computer, Communication and Electrical Engineering - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Foundations and Frontiers in Computer, Communication and Electrical Engineering, C2E2 - 2016 | Year: 2016

In this paper, we consolidate on the numerous research and development, whichendeavors towards seamless convergence of cloud computing, telecommunication, and networking. The advanced telecommunications and wireless networking technologies could further be accelerated successfully with the overlapping from cloud computing. Classically, networking, especially wireless and mobile networking, and cloud computing, have been taken under consideration by scientific literatures but through separate approaches. Recently, the need of virtual resource sharing is felt important through cloud computing in mobile networking due to the enhanced requirements of capacity and quality of services. As a result, we can see a large number of efforts are made to converge with wireless technology and cloud computing. It gives rise to the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) for the purpose of network virtualization thereby making Network as a Service (NaaS) a prospective dimension of cloud based networking. This survey comprehensively summarizes the endeavors from the perspective of next generation cellular networking and also takes into account the open research areas to get the utmost benefit from the amalgamation of telecommunication and cloud computing. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


Das P.,The Ohio State University | Mitra R.N.,University of Cincinnati | Suppakitjarak N.,University of Cincinnati
Foundations and Frontiers in Computer, Communication and Electrical Engineering - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Foundations and Frontiers in Computer, Communication and Electrical Engineering, C2E2 - 2016 | Year: 2016

In this paper, we present an innovated design and evaluation of SCARP (Smart shoes with Cueing system And Remote monitoring of Parkinson’s patients), a system comprising of sensor based wearable pair of smart shoes for online-offline monitoring and detecting gait impairment of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients. This novel system, hidden inside a shoe sole, is capable of providing visual cue on automatically recognizing Freezing of Gait (FoG), which then continues till the freezing is ceased. The shoe is equipped with a WiFi module to send the data from wearable sensors to a centralized server for remote monitoring. Health providers and doctors can access patients’ gait data in real-time and could also use it later for offline analysis. The data in the server may be used to create an online gait repository. We also developed a User Interface (UI) to aid online monitoring of gait data. This UI is provisioned with user’s selection of date-time as input for graphical representation of the data stored in database. This helps to graphically observe the variation of data over a period of days, week, and month. Thus, the work herein presented shows that wearable sensors combined with an embedded system makes real-time decision of initiating visual cue, provides reliable detection of FoG and sends the information that can be further used for clinical inferences. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Almost everyone covered through Ohio's Medicaid expansion would have no other viable insurance option should the Affordable Care Act be repealed, a new study has found. Law and public health researchers from The Ohio State University determined that 95 percent of newly enrolled beneficiaries would be without a plausible pathway to coverage. The research appears online in the American Journal of Public Health. "Many of these people have nothing else to turn to," said Eric Seiber, lead author and associate professor of health services management and policy in Ohio State's College of Public Health. "Their choice is Medicaid or medical bankruptcy." Ohio is one of 31 states (and Washington D.C.) to expand Medicaid eligibility as part of the Affordable Care Act. The move, which came in January 2014, made eligible those adults with incomes below 138 percent of the federal poverty level. (In 2015, that was about $16,243 earned annually for an individual.) Prior to the ACA, Ohio generally did not grant Medicaid eligibility to childless adults unless they were pregnant or disabled. Parents qualified for Medicaid only if their family income was below 90 percent of the federal poverty level. By October of last year, enrollment under expansion in Ohio had reached about 712,000 people. Efforts to repeal or substantially restructure the ACA reforms are under way. Seiber and Micah Berman, assistant professor of public health and law at Ohio State's College of Public Health and Moritz College of Law, evaluated data from 42,876 household that participated in Ohio's 2015 Medicaid Assessment Survey. The telephone survey includes a set of questions to identify coverage immediately before Medicaid enrollment. The new Ohio State research was driven by this question: "If the ACA is fully or partially repealed, who would lose their coverage and what would happen to them?" The researchers found that the vast majority would find themselves without insurance in the case of a full ACA repeal. Though 17.7 percent of survey participants had private health insurance prior to Medicaid enrollment, most had lost their jobs (and their coverage) or were ineligible for employer-sponsored group health plans at the time of enrollment. The researchers found that 4.8 percent of the new Medicaid recipients were eligible for insurance through their jobs, leaving 95.2 percent of new enrollees with no feasible alternative. Seiber and Berman also found that a rollback would predominantly affect older, low-income whites with less than a college education. "The impact of insurance is about a lot more than health care," Berman said. "For people newly enrolled in Medicaid, it means that should they have a major health-related event, they can still pay for food, have stable housing, get out of debt. These are all things that make a huge difference in quality of life." A recent Ohio Medicaid analysis, which was conducted with help from Seiber and Berman and mentioned in the new study, found that that the expansion increased access to medical care, reduced unmet medical needs, improved self-reported health status and alleviated financial distress - all results found in other states that have expanded access to government coverage. The new study shows that the majority of adults newly enrolled in Medicaid did not drop private insurance in favor of the government coverage, Seiber said. "These are very low-income adults, many of whom lost their jobs and have nothing to go back to," he said. Said Berman, "It counters this perception that people have health insurance but then go on Medicaid to save money. That's just not what the data show." That did happen, to an extent, with expansion of Medicaid coverage for children. But that was a different scenario because children's eligibility begins at much higher family income levels than those in place for new adult enrollees, Seiber said. Seiber and Berman said they hope the study offers some scientific data that will be useful during discussions of ACA repeal or revision and what it could mean for Americans now covered by Medicaid. "I don't think everyone realizes that if you repeal the ACA, that at the same time eliminates the Medicaid expansion," Seiber said. One potential weakness of the study is that the researchers were not able to evaluate how many people on Medicaid had the option to move to private insurance - because they were newly employed, for instance - but did not go that route. That type of analysis was not possible with the state-gathered data, Seiber said. "While it is possible that some portion of these enrollees have since been hired by an employer that offers (insurance), it is unlikely that this would meaningfully improve the insurance outlook for this population," he and Berman wrote. The researchers said it's important to consider the demographics of those covered under Medicaid expansion, including the fact that many are older and already have chronic health conditions that will become more costly and problematic without regular care. "It's a really broad cross section, and tends to be older and whiter and more rural than many would expect," Seiber said.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - A new nationwide study has found that children entering first grade in 2013 had significantly better reading skills than similar students had just 12 years earlier. Researchers say this means that in general, children are better readers at a younger age, but the study also revealed where gaps remain -- especially in more advanced reading skills. The good news was that even low-achieving students saw gains in basic reading skills over this time period and actually narrowed the achievement gap with other young readers. However, that didn't translate into better overall reading for the less-skilled children. The research showed that the gap between low-achieving readers and others actually widened when it came to advanced reading skills. "Overall, it is good news," said Jerome D'Agostino, co-author of the study and professor of educational studies at The Ohio State University. "We have evidence that the increased emphasis on learning important skills earlier in life is having a real impact on helping develop reading abilities by first grade." But the results also show that strategies to help preschoolers who are having trouble with language skills need to be adjusted, said co-author Emily Rodgers, associate professor of teaching and learning at Ohio State. "We're probably spending too much time emphasizing basic skills for the low-achieving students, when we should be giving them more opportunities to actually read text," she said. Their study is published in the current issue of the journal Educational Researcher. The study involved 2,358 schools from 44 states. A total of 364,738 children were assessed during the 12 years of the study. This included 313,488 low-achieving students who were selected to participate in Reading Recovery, a literacy intervention for first-grade students. Another 51,250 randomly selected students from the same schools also participated. All children were tested at the beginning of first grade, before the Reading Recovery students began their intervention program. Students took a screening test called An Observation Survey of Early Literacy Achievement. The survey measures four basic skills (letter identification, word recognition, ability to identify and use sounds and print awareness), as well as two advanced skills (writing vocabulary and text reading). The results showed that average scores on all six parts of the test increased over the 12 years, suggesting that many children end kindergarten with the skills they used to learn in first grade. "Children are better prepared when they enter first grade than they used to be. Kindergarten is the new first grade when it comes to learning reading skills," Rodgers said. In the four basic skills, low-achieving students narrowed the achievement gap with other readers. But in the two advanced skills -- including actually reading text -- the gap widened. This data can't say why that is, D'Agostino said. "There's a missing link between teaching low-achieving students basic literacy skills and having them actually put those skills to use in reading," he said. "We don't know what that is yet." However, he noted that while poorer readers did reduce the achievement gap in basics skills, the gap was still sizable. "We're getting the low-achievement students only part of the way there," Rodgers said. "They're doing better at learning sounds and letters and now we have to do a better job helping them put it all together and read text." Why have reading scores for entering first-graders improved since 2002? D'Agostino and Rodgers said that two influential national reports released in the 2000s (the National Reading Panel in 2000 and the National Early Literacy Panel in 2008) urged changes in reading instruction. Both of those reports, as well as the No Child Left Behind law, led to an increased emphasis on learning important skills related to reading achievement in preschool and kindergarten, the researchers said. "Those reports and legislation had at least some of the desired effect," D'Agostino said. "But now we need to make sure that low-achieving students don't fall further behind."


Sam Ting speaks softly and deliberately as he gets ready to deliver some juicy news to his audience. "You normally cannot hear me anyway," jokes the physicist at the start of a talk this past December at CERN, the particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, while a technician fiddles with his microphone. Ting may be soft-spoken, but few would call him retiring. Two decades ago, Ting persuaded funders to spend $1.5 billion to build the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). In 2011, NASA launched the 8.5-metric-ton magnet on the penultimate space shuttle flight and attached it to the International Space Station (ISS). Now he is capturing attention again, with a hint—buried at the end of his talk—that the AMS is finally delivering on the promise of its original name, when "AM" stood for "antimatter." So far, the AMS has measured the masses and electric charges of some 90 billion particles that have passed through the magnet's maw. Nearly all of those are protons and helium nuclei, along with a smattering of electrons and nuclei of carbon, oxygen, and iron. A precious few are antiprotons and positrons: the antimatter counterparts of protons and electrons. To Ting, those antiparticles may be clues to the unseen "dark matter" that weighs down galaxies with extra gravity, although many astrophysicists regard them as the byproduct of humdrum galactic events. Those antiparticles are not Ting's big news, however. At CERN, and again in a 16 February talk at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, where he has worked since 1969, Ting says that the AMS may have trapped a bigger and weirder form of antimatter. The AMS, he says, has seen a handful of candidate particles of antihelium-3, made of two antiprotons and an antineutron. In labs on Earth, physicists have made antihelium for a few fleeting instants, but no one has ever detected it in space. "It was shocking," says physicist Michael Salamon, AMS project manager at the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, D.C., who heard about the results when Ting called him during a vacation. It's so unexpected that Ting says he has refrained from publishing the finding or even asking theorists what might be going on. "I want to make sure the signal is genuine," he tells Science. Detecting antihelium in nature could shake up cosmology. A single confirmed detection could indicate the existence of islands of antimatter that have survived since the big bang, or point to particle interactions beyond the standard model of physics. And for Ting, who turned 81 in January, it would be a vindication, a final retort to his strident critics. In 1976, Ting shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for discovering a subatomic particle called the J/Psi meson. It was 1994 when he first proposed using the AMS to take the particle hunt to space. He promptly drew flak. Some contended that the project, funded by international partners and DOE, had won support through savvy political maneuvering instead of a normal scientific review, and that it wouldn't deliver big insights. Ting's results so far amount to "physics by press conference," says Greg Tarlé, an astrophysicist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and a vocal critic of Ting and the AMS. Ting's marquee AMS result—that more high-energy positrons than expected are buzzing around the galaxy—has not impressed the doubters. That positron excess, which a European satellite found in the mid-2000s and the AMS confirmed, has sparked hundreds of theory papers connecting it to hypothetical dark matter particles. The mutual annihilation of those particles might create a half-and-half blend of electrons and positrons in a narrow energy range. The electrons would fade into a sea of electrons from other sources, but the rarer positrons might stand out. To Ting, the best explanation for the extra positrons is a dark matter particle with a mass of 1 teraelectronvolt—about as much energy as a flying mosquito. Other researchers favor more familiar astrophysical sources. The proliferation of dark matter models, including those that Ting points to, "maybe has more to do with communities and how fast they write papers than it does with science," says Tim Linden, a particle astrophysicist at The Ohio State University in Columbus. He and others note that the Milky Way is a messy laboratory, roiling with pulsars—the spinning, highly magnetic cores of collapsed stars—and supernovas, which accelerate protons to ultrahigh energies and send them slamming into cooler gas. Both phenomena could generate the antimatter that the AMS sees. But the "four or five" antihelium candidates Ting says it has tallied over the past 5 years would be something else altogether. There are few conceivable ways for conventional astrophysical processes or dark matter particles to generate that much antihelium, says Kerstin Perez, a particle astrophysicist at MIT. She is co-leading a balloon experiment that could search for antihelium when it launches over Antarctica in 2020. "If it's real," she says of Ting's claim, "it's something fundamentally new." It also would validate Ting's original proposal. When Ting sold NASA and DOE on the AMS, he said it might find runaway particles from oases of antimatter, helping solve a deep riddle. The big bang produced matter and antimatter in equal amounts. Soon after, they began colliding and annihilating each other in puffs of gamma rays. But somehow, matter came to dominate the observable universe. That could be because of some fundamental difference between the two—or maybe it was just a coin flip, where certain regions of space came to be ruled by one or the other. Ting's idea to look for those regions galvanized his critics, who considered it outlandish because clumps of antimatter coexisting with normal galaxies would produce more gamma radiation than astronomers observe. Moreover, large antiparticles could not easily survive the journey to the AMS. But if antimatter were there, the AMS would sniff it out—or so the original pitch went. The feeling both inside and outside of the AMS team, though, is that it's still far too early to rule out a more mundane explanation: a problem in the detector. As charged particles pass through the doughnut-shaped magnet, its field bends their paths into signature curves that indicate their charge and momentum. The particles arc through nine cooled-down silicon detectors that track the curves. About a billion times a year the particle turns out to be a helium nucleus, with two positive charges. But each year has also brought one event or so that for all the world looks like it is curving with charge equal to minus two, Ting says—the expected signature of antihelium. The events could just be heliums bouncing unusually off an atom inside the experiment, leading to a misidentification. But the team has used computers to model all the possible paths a particle could take in the detector. "We still do not see any possible way this could come from any background," Ting says. "Many people in the collaboration think we should publish it." That he hasn't done so yet is typical of Ting, his supporters say. "That is kind of his trademark, so to speak , to be extremely sure when something comes out," says Philip von Doetinchem of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu, who is a member of the AMS team but has not worked on the antihelium problem. But critics see it differently. "He knows that he has an instrumental problem," Tarlé says. To Tarlé, Ting is strategically playing coy to drum up further support for the mission. And Ting may need it. DOE, which will review the AMS in 2019, is eager for breakthroughs—not routine astrophysics. "Understanding the spectra of particular species of cosmic rays is good to know, but it's not as important, quite frankly," Salamon says. A more pressing concern is that just one of four redundant pumps that cool its silicon trackers is working at full strength. If the AMS can last until 2024, when the United States and other nations plan to stop funding the ISS, the magnet should be able to double its census of particles. Achieving that would not only help differentiate between exotic and mundane interpretations of its positron signals but also could give Ting more antihelium candidates. Ting won't say whether having 10 or more will provide the statistical power required to call this a discovery, but he says each one helps. Ting says he is planning to replace the broken pumps with a new system that astronauts would install during a spacewalk. A NASA spokesperson confirms that planning for the repair is underway, in case the last pump breaks. The agency has devoted $16 million to possible spacewalks between now and 2019. DOE and Ting's international partners have already purchased the replacement parts, he says. "There's no money issue," Ting says. If, after all these years, the AMS falls short of finding antihelium, it won't be for lack of trying. Clarification: A previous version of the story incorrectly suggested that DOE is impatient with the AMS project.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Legal marijuana shops are linked to higher levels of property crime in nearby areas, according to a nearly three-year study in Denver. Researchers found that crime isn't higher in the area immediately surrounding marijuana outlets. But adjacent areas saw about 84 more property crimes per year than neighborhoods without a nearby marijuana store. In Denver, no significant increase in violent crime was seen as a result of marijuana sales. The results show that legal marijuana sales come with a cost, said Bridget Freisthler, lead author of the study and professor of social work at The Ohio State University. "If you're looking strictly from a public health standpoint, there is reason to be somewhat concerned about having a marijuana outlet near your home," Freisthler said. Putting this risk in context, marijuana outlets led to similar levels of property crime as bars, liquor stores and restaurants that serve alcohol, data from the study suggests. And businesses that sold alcohol led to much more violent crime than marijuana outlets. The study was published online today in the Journal of Primary Prevention. The researchers examined crime statistics for 481 Census block groups in Denver over 34 months (January 2013 to October 2015). When the study began, marijuana could only be sold for medical purposes. But beginning in January 2014, marijuana outlets were able to sell to the general public, giving the researchers the opportunity to see if recreational sales were tied to increases in crime. They examined three types of crime, based on data from the Denver Police Department: Violent crime, property crime and marijuana outlet specific crime. The change in the law allowing recreational sales did not result in an increase in crime, results showed. "It is the number and density of outlets that is important, not whether they are medical or recreational," Freisthler said. But there is a caveat to that finding. After the law was first changed to allow recreational sales, only those dispensaries that already were selling for medical purposes were allowed to apply for a license to sell recreational marijuana in Colorado. As a result, the number of outlets didn't change much. This is the second study Freisthler and colleagues have published on crime and marijuana outlets. The earlier study, published last year, was done in Long Beach, Calif. In both studies, property crimes didn't increase right next to the outlet, but in the adjacent neighborhood. That's probably because the dispensaries often have security guards and cameras keeping an eye out on the immediate area, Freisthler said. "The areas we examined in our study were relatively small (about a third of a square mile), so a guard could conceivably be keeping criminals away from the neighborhood directly surrounding the outlets," she said. One way to understand the effect of marijuana stores on crime is to compare them to places that sell alcohol. Data from the study showed that marijuana outlets contributed to 1,579 property crimes in Denver over 34 months, compared to the combined alcohol outlet contribution of 1,521. "The levels of property crimes were similar, although marijuana outlets were responsible for slightly more," Freisthler said. Alcohol outlets, however, were responsible for about four times more violent crimes during the 34 months of the study than those that sold marijuana (372 vs. 93). But Freisthler cautioned that a direct comparison is difficult because the effects related to marijuana outlets take into account crimes in local and adjacent areas while the data for alcohol outlets only look at adjacent areas. Still, she said it is concerning that there is this level of crime associated with marijuana sales, despite the fact that the density of marijuana outlets is much lower compared to that of alcohol outlets. "Over time, as marijuana grows in popularity, densities of marijuana outlets may increase, resulting in higher crime," Freisthler said. While this study did not find a significant increase in violent crime related to marijuana shops, the study in Long Beach did. That suggests it is too early to say that legal marijuana sales don't result in significantly more violent crime, she said. This new study did find, not surprisingly, that legal sales were linked to an increase in burglaries and other crimes at marijuana outlets themselves. From the data in the study, the researchers can't tell who is committing the crimes and who the victims are in the nearby neighborhoods. Customers of the marijuana outlets could be the victims or the perpetrators, according to Freisthler. "That's important to know, because residents may want to mobilize if they are the victims of increased crime. But if it is not the residents being victimized, they may not care as much," she said. Freisthler said the findings of this, as well as her previous study, suggest there are reasons for citizens to be cautious about legal marijuana sales. "There are definitely negative public health consequences, including increased crime," she said. "There may be economic benefits in terms of more tax revenue and money spent in neighborhoods. Citizens have to decide how they want to measure the benefits and costs." Freisthler conducted the study with Andrew Gaidus, William Ponicki and Paul Gruenewald of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation; and Christina Tam of UCLA. The research was supported by grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.


MASON, Ohio--(BUSINESS WIRE)--After completing a seed round of funding raising $1.2 million for its new technology which offers a non-invasive tool for the detection and localization of cardiovascular disease, startup Genetesis has chosen the Mason Tech Elevator as its new home where company founders will work to scale the business for clinical testing and commercialization. “We have found the right partner for long-term growth and talent attraction in the City of Mason,” said Peeyush Shrivastava, CEO of Genetesis and junior in biomedical science at The Ohio State University. “This is truly a milestone for us, and we love being in the middle of the growing biotech corridor in Mason.” CardioFlux, the Genetesis technology, was developed by Peeyush and some of his high school friends, who are now co-founders with him. The technology monitors the electrical current flowing around a beating heart non-invasively. This ability to localize abnormalities of the heart through magnetic imaging is a game-changing discovery that could improve time to treatment for chest pain patients, potentially saving lives and substantial healthcare delivery costs. “We are so enthusiastic about the potential to provide a thoughtful, patient-friendly diagnostic system for chest pain that will provide a fast, accurate diagnosis, reducing the number of tests needed, lengths of stay and overall costs,” said Alisa Niksch, M.D., Chief Medical Officer for Genetesis and Director of Pediatric Electrophysiology and Exercise Stress Lab at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. Genetesis completed a preliminary study with 28 patients at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, and published results via poster at the American Heart Association’s 2016 conference. A new study to gauge accuracy on 100 patients will begin in May at St. John Hospital and Medical Center in Detroit. Mason Mayor Victor Kidd said, “The future of our economy depends on how well we leverage and support powerful, life-changing discoveries like this one and help that technology reach the markets it serves.” “Supporting groundbreaking bioscience technology like CardioFlux and the bright young minds that developed it is exactly why we established the Mason Tech Elevator program,” said Michele Blair, Director of Economic Development. Genetesis announced it had raised $1.2 million in November of 2016 in a seed financing round led by CincyTech and billionaire Mark Cuban’s Radical Investments. Shrivastava says he approached Cuban with a direct appeal to his personal email. Cuban began as an advisor and then grew interested in investing. “This young company has made considerable progress, already generating meaningful clinical data through its partnership with the Mayo Clinic,” said John Rice, PhD, Director of Life Sciences at CincyTech. “Mason continues to be a solid partner for us with several of our life science companies finding the resources, collaboration and connections to others in their field through a growing hub there.”


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

That wonderful moment when the solution to a problem suddenly pops into your head might actually be signaled beforehand by your eyes, a new study finds. By tracking the eye movements of people in the study, the researchers were able to pinpoint the moment leading up to a person's epiphany, or an "aha" moment. The researchers were studying what's called "epiphany learning" — in other words, that exact "aha" moment when a person has an "unexpected moment of insight," according to the study, which was published today (April 17) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [10 Things You Didn't Know About You] But because epiphanies are, by nature, "sudden, unexpected and irreversible," it's difficult for scientists to predict when a person will have one, the researchers, James Chen, a graduate student in economics at The Ohio State University; and Ian Krajbich, a professor of psychology at the same institution, wrote in the study. To zero in on the moment people experienced epiphanies, the researchers asked the 59 students in the study to play a strategy game on a computer. Here's how the game worked: In each round, two students faced off against each other. Each player was shown the numbers zero to 10 and was asked to pick a number. Without the students’ knowing exactly how the game worked, the computer averaged the numbers that the two players chose and then multiplied that number by 0.9, which resulted in a final number. This final number was displayed to the students, and the player who had initially selected the number closest to this final number was the winner. "Because the average of the two numbers is by definition halfway between those numbers," and multiplying that average by 0.9 will result in a smaller number, the person who picks the smaller number will always win, the researchers wrote. "Therefore, picking zero is the optimal strategy, regardless of what the other player chooses," they wrote. Of course, the students playing the game weren't told what the optimal strategy was beforehand. The researchers wanted to see what would happen during the "epiphany" moment when they finally figured it out on their own. "There's a sudden change in their behavior," Krajbich said in a statement. "They are choosing other numbers, and then all of a sudden, they switch to choosing only zero. That's the hallmark of an epiphany." [Top 10 Mysteries of the Mind] In the study, 42 percent of the students figured out the optimal strategy of choosing zero at some point during the game, the researchers found. Another 37 percent committed to a strategy in which they selected the same number over and over, although it was the wrong number, and 20 percent never seemed to develop a strategy. To see if there were any clues leading up the students' epiphanies, the researchers tracked the students' eye movements as they played the game. In the game, the 10 numbers were displayed in a circle (like that of a rotary phone). After the player selected his or her number, a new screen appeared, asking if the player wanted to commit to his or her choice for the rest of the game — in other words, stick with the number for all of the remaining rounds. The third and final screen that appeared showed the results of the each round. The researchers found that in the rounds of the game leading up a person's epiphany moment (the moment he or she committed to zero for the remaining games), he or she looked at zero and other low numbers more often than people who didn't have an epiphany, even if the player didn't always choose zero. "We don't see the epiphany in their choice of numbers, but we see it in their eyes," Chen said in a statement. "Their attention is drawn to zero," he said. The researchers also looked at pupil dilation, which is a sign that a person is paying close attention and learning, Krajbich said. They found that during each round before the epiphany, the player's pupils dilated when he or she viewed the final screen showing the results. After a player had the epiphany, that person's pupils didn't dilate when the participant viewed the results screen. The findings suggested that these players were learning before they had their epiphany, while the players who didn’t have epiphanies weren't learning, Krajbich said.


Treatment of epilepsy has been a big challenge for patients experiencing intense and uncontrollable convulsions or seizures. In most medications for epilepsy, the relief is assessed on the basis of success in reducing the frequency of seizures. There is now some good news as some components of cannabis can be useful in treating epilepsy. Unlike other forms of epilepsy, those with refractory epilepsy such as Dravet syndrome or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or LGS, have been facing the problem of insufficient treatment options to control the multiple seizures. They also face the challenge of side effects such as cognitive impairment, behavioral disturbances, and developmental delays. Now the silver lining is that there are promising results for patients of hard-to-treat epilepsy with marijuana extracts. Two components in cannabis — THC, the main psychoactive substance, and cannabidiol or CBD — are finding useful applications in treating such extreme cases. A study reports new evidence of oil cannabidiol helping the reduction of seizures in those affected with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Already there is the inspirational case of Charlotte Figi, a Colorado girl aged six, who had been hit by Dravet syndrome and who experienced relief from a cannabis derivative. After the failure of many treatments, the little girl's parents persuaded the doctors to prescribe cannabis oil with lower THC and higher CBD concentrations. It worked, and the girl showed remarkable reductions in seizures with the numbers down to two or three a month compared with 300 seizures a week. The case was widely reported on media. Inspired by Charlotte's case and pot legalization in some states, scientists started investigating how the marijuana plant can help people with refractory epilepsy. For patients with LGS, drop seizures are accompanied by convulsions in the entire body, and they also lose consciousness. The seizures are tough to control, and medications will not work in most cases. The worry is that such cases also impair intellectual development. "Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizures that are otherwise difficult to control," said study author Anup Patel, M.D., of Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus. During the test's trials, cannabidiol was administered to 225 people in the age group of 16, most of whom were affected by LGS. The trials lasted 14 weeks to assess whether an oil form of cannabidiol can cut a special type of seizures called "drop seizures" compared with a placebo. The results turned out to be positive, with average drop seizures of 85 a month showing a 42 percent decline after giving participants a higher dose of cannabidiol. Nearly 40 percent of the participants reported a remarkable reduction in seizures. That showed cannabidiol taken in liquid drops with no dosage limit had led to fewer seizures than the placebo group, where the drug was given in varying doses. Though medical marijuana has been dubbed an easy route for a high, THC in pill form has been advised for people under chemotherapy to avoid nausea and weight loss. In the case of epilepsy, cannabidiol is being used for treating the sick. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Bloomington, IN - April 27, 2017 - The Midwest Political Science Association announced fourteen award recipients at its annual MPSA Business Meeting earlier this month at the Palmer House Hilton in Chicago. Awards committees select the winners from among nominations made by chairs, discussants and section heads at the previous year's conference. Best Paper by an Emerging Scholar - Honoring the best paper, regardless of field or topic, by a scholar or scholars who has or have received the terminal degree(s) within six years of the year in which the paper was presented. Javier Osorio, City University of New York Livia I. Schubiger, London School of Economics Michael Weintraub, Binghamton University, SUNY Best Paper in International Relations - Honoring the best paper on the topic of international relations. Award Committee: Vesna Danilovic, University at Buffalo (Chair); David Cunningham, University of Maryland; Karl Kalenthaler, University of Akron Best Paper Presented by a Graduate Student - Honoring the best paper delivered by a graduate student. Can New Procedures Improve the Quality of Policing? The Case of 'Stop, Question and Frisk' in New York City Best Paper Presented in a Poster Format - Honoring the best paper presented in a poster format. Best Undergraduate Paper Presented in a Poster Format - Honoring the best paper presented in a poster format by an undergraduate. The Effect of Nationality on Grass-root Volunteer and Donors Support for Nongovernmental Organizations Kellogg/Notre Dame Award - Honoring the best paper in comparative politics. Anti-Identities in Latin America: Chavismo, Fujimorismo, and Uribismo in Comparative Perspective Award Committee: Sarah Brooks, The Ohio State University (Chair); Alex Tan, University of Canterbury; Zeynep Somer-Topcu, The University of Texas at Austin Kenneth J. Meier Award - Honoring the best paper in bureaucratic politics, public administration, or public policy. Slow-Rolling, Fast-Tracking, and the Pace of Bureaucratic Decisions in Rulemaking Lucius Barker Award - Honoring the best paper on a topic investigating race or ethnicity and politics and honoring the spirit and work of Professor Barker. Saved from a Second Slavery: Black Voter Registration in Louisiana from Reconstruction to the Voting Rights Act Review of Politics Award (co-winners) - Honoring the best paper in normative political theory. Reparative Justice and the Moral Limits of Discretionary Philanthropy Chiara Cordelli, University of Chicago Edmund Burke and the Deliberative Sublime Rob Goodman, Columbia University Robert H. Durr Award - Honoring the best paper applying quantitative methods to a substantive problem. Of Rents and Rumors: Government Competence and Media Freedom in Authoritarian Countries Sophonisba Breckinridge Award - Honoring the best paper on the topic of women and politics. Making Space for Women: Explaining Citizen Support for Legislative Gender Quotas in Latin America Pi Sigma Alpha Award - Honoring the best paper presented at the MPSA Annual National Conference. Sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor society. AJPS Best Article Award - Honoring the best article appearing in the volume of the American Journal of Political Science published in the year preceding the conference. The Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA) is an international organization with a membership of approximately 7,000 political science faculty, researchers and graduate students representing more than 100 countries. Founded in 1939, the MPSA is dedicated to the advancement of scholarship in all areas of political science. MPSA publishes the American Journal of Political Science the top research journal in the discipline.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Family structure including regular bedtimes, mealtimes and limited screen time appear to be linked to better emotional health in preschoolers, and that might lower the chances of obesity later, a new study suggests. "This study provides more evidence that routines for preschool-aged children are associated with their healthy development and could reduce the likelihood that these children will be obese," said lead author Sarah Anderson of The Ohio State University. The study - the first to look at the connections between early childhood routines and self-regulation and their potential association with weight problems in the pre-teen years - appears in the International Journal of Obesity. Researchers evaluated three household routines when children were 3 years old: regular bedtime, regular mealtime and whether or not parents limited television and video watching to an hour or less daily. Then they compared those to parents' reports of two aspects of children's self-regulation at that same age. Lastly, they investigated how the routines and self-regulation worked together to impact obesity at age 11, defined based on international criteria. (The U.S. criteria for childhood obesity is set lower and would have included more children.) The research included 10,955 children who are part of the Millennium Cohort Study, a long-term study of a diverse population of children born in the United Kingdom from September of 2000 to January of 2002. At age 3, 41 percent of children always had a regular bedtime, 47 percent always had a regular mealtime and 23 percent were limited to an hour or less daily of TV and videos. At age 11, about 6 percent were obese. All three household routines were associated with better emotional self-regulation - a measure based on parents' responses to questions such as how easily the child becomes frustrated or over-excited. Those children with greater emotional dysregulation were more likely to be obese later. "We saw that children who had the most difficulties with emotion regulation at age 3 also were more likely to be obese at age 11," said Anderson, an associate professor in Ohio State's College of Public Health. Anderson and her colleagues also found that the absence of a regular preschool bedtime was an independent predictor of obesity at 11. Obesity risk increased even when children "usually" had a regular bedtime, as opposed to "always." The risk was greatest for those who had the least amount of consistency in their bedtimes. How persistent and independent children were at age 3 - another aspect of self-regulation - was not related to obesity risk, nor were routines associated with these aspects of self-regulation. The new findings build on previous research by Anderson and her colleagues showing an association between earlier preschool bedtimes and decreased odds of obesity later. Previous work published in 2010 showed in a US national sample that obesity prevalence was lowest for children who got enough sleep, had limits on screen time and ate meals with their families. "This research allows us to better understand how young children's routines around sleep, meals, and screen time relate to their regulation of emotion and behavior," Anderson said. "The large, population-based, UK Millennium Cohort Study afforded the opportunity to examine these aspects of children's lives and how they impact future risk for obesity." This research should prompt future work looking at the role of emotional self-regulation in weight gain in children and how bedtime routines can support healthy development, Anderson said. "Sleep is so important and it's important for children in particular. Although there is much that remains unknown about how sleep impacts metabolism, research is increasingly finding connections between obesity and poor sleep," she said. While it's impossible from this work to prove that routines will prevent obesity, "Recommending regular bedtime routines is unlikely to cause harm, and may help children in other ways, such as through emotion regulation," Anderson said. But competing family pressures including parents' work schedules don't always allow for consistency, Anderson pointed out. "As a society, we should consider what we can do to make it easier for parents to interact with their children in ways that support their own and their children's health." The National Institutes of Health and the U.K. Economic and Social Research Council supported the study. Researchers from the University College London and Temple University also worked on the study.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Everybody loves those rare "aha moments" where you suddenly and unexpectedly solve a difficult problem or understand something that had previously perplexed you. But until now, researchers had not had a good way to study how people actually experienced what is called "epiphany learning." In new research, scientists at The Ohio State University used eye-tracking and pupil dilation technology to see what happens as people figured out how to win a strategy game on a computer. "We could see our study participants figuring out the solution through their eye movements as they considered their options," said Ian Krajbich, co-author of the study and assistant professor of psychology and economics at Ohio State. "We could predict they were about to have an epiphany before they even knew it was coming." Krajbich conducted the study with James Wei Chen, a doctoral student in economics at Ohio State. Their results were published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Most decision-making research has focused on reinforcement learning, where people gradually adjust their behavior in response to what they learn, Chen said. "Our work is novel in that we're looking at this other kind of learning that really has been neglected in past research," he said. For the study, 59 students played a game on a computer against an unseen opponent. On the screen were 11 numbers (0 to 10) arranged in a circle (like a rotary phone, for those old enough to remember). The students chose one number and then their opponent chose a number. The details of how they won are somewhat complex (it had to be complex for them to have something to figure out), but essentially the optimal game strategy boils down to picking the lower number. Therefore, picking zero was always the best choice. The participants played 30 times in a row, always against a new opponent. The researchers created an incentive to win by awarding small payments for each victory. An eye-tracker sitting under the computer screen could tell what numbers they were looking at as they considered their options during parts of the experiment. After each of the trials, participants had the option of committing to playing one number for the rest of the trials. They were encouraged to do so by the promise of an extra payment. Participants were then reminded what number they chose, what number their opponent had chosen, and whether they had won or lost. The goal for the researchers was to see when players had that epiphany, that "aha moment," in which they realized that zero was always the best choice and then committed to playing that number for the rest of the experiment. The results showed that about 42 percent of players had an epiphany at some point and committed to playing zero. Another 37 percent committed to a number other that zero, suggesting they didn't learn the right lesson. The remaining 20 percent never committed to a number. The researchers could tell when a player had an epiphany. "There's a sudden change in their behavior. They are choosing other numbers and then all of a sudden they switch to choosing only zero," Krajbich said. "That's a hallmark of epiphany learning." These participants gave clues that they were about to have that aha moment, even if they didn't realize it. The eye-tracker showed they looked at zero and other low numbers more often than others did in the trials just before their epiphany, even if they ended up choosing other numbers. "We don't see the epiphany in their choice of numbers, but we see it in their eyes," Chen said. "Their attention is drawn to zero and they start testing it more and more." Those who had the epiphanies also spent less time looking at their opponents' number choices and more time considering the result of each trial - whether they won or lost. The researchers said this suggests they were learning that their choice of a low number was the key to victory. A key to epiphany learning is that it comes suddenly, which was evident when the researchers looked at eye-tracking results on the commitment screen. This was the screen where participants could choose to commit to zero (or another number) for the rest of the trials. "Those who showed epiphany learning weren't building up confidence over time. There was no increase in the amount of time they looked at the 'commit' button as they went through the trials, which would have indicated they were considering committing," Krajbich said. "They weren't paying a lot of attention to the commit button until the moment they decided to commit," Chen added. Findings on pupil dilation provided additional evidence that epiphany learners were reacting differently than others. "When your pupil dilates, we see that as evidence that you're paying close attention and learning," Krajbich said. Results showed those who experienced epiphany learning experienced significant pupil dilation while viewing the feedback screen (telling them whether they won or lost) before they made the commit decision. The dilation disappeared after they committed. "They were showing signs of learning before they made the commitment to zero," Krajbich said. "We didn't see the same results for others." These results suggest that you have to look within to truly experience epiphany learning. "One thing we can take away from this research is that it is better to think about a problem than to simply follow others," Krajbich said. "Those who paid more attention to their opponents tended to learn the wrong lesson." This research was supported by a National Science Foundation Career Grant to Krajbich.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - A financially strapped pregnant woman's worries about the arrival and care of her little one could contribute to birth of a smaller, medically vulnerable infant, a new study suggests. Researchers at The Ohio State University found that pregnancy-specific distress, such as concerns that the baby's needs won't be met, appears to be a pathway between financial strain and higher likelihood of a low-birth-weight infant. The study appeared in the journal Archives of Women's Mental Health. "There is an opportunity here to look for interventions during pregnancy that could help mitigate the effects of financial strain on birth outcomes," said lead author Amanda Mitchell, a postdoctoral researcher in Ohio State Wexner Medical Center's Stress and Health in Pregnancy Research Program. While larger efforts to improve access to housing, jobs and support for low-income women is critical, there are potential low-cost, stress-reduction techniques that could help reduce risk, Mitchell said. Meditation and breathing exercises could prove useful, for instance, she said. "It's important for all women who experience pregnancy-related stress to seek out help coping with that stress," Mitchell said. "And ob-gyns and other medical providers should also talk about stress during their visits with expecting moms." The study included 138 pregnant women who filled out questionnaires to assess financial strain, depressive symptoms, pregnancy-specific distress, perceived stress and general anxiety. Moms in the racially diverse study group were between five and 31 weeks pregnant and 29 years old on average at the time of the assessment. The study, which was primarily designed to evaluate flu vaccine effectiveness, ran from 2013 to 2015. After the participants' babies were born, researchers were able to review medical records to compare birth weight against moms' questionnaire responses during pregnancy. The researchers knew from previous studies that pregnant moms who are socioeconomically disadvantaged have a higher likelihood of having smaller babies and worse birth outcomes. What they wanted to learn was whether specific factors could be driving that connection - factors that could lead to positive interventions for women at risk of delivering low-birth-weight babies. Statistical models designed to identify those drivers landed on one statistically significant factor: pregnancy-specific distress. "This includes concerns about labor and delivery, about relationships changing, about working after the baby arrives, paying for medical care, and whether the baby will be unhealthy," said study senior author Lisa Christian, associate professor of psychiatry and a member of the Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research at Ohio State. Financial strain was assessed based on a five-point scale derived from moms' responses to three questions: "How difficult is it for you to live on your total household income right now?" "In the next two months, how likely is it that you and your family will experience actual hardships, such as inadequate housing, food, or medical attention?" and "How likely is it that you and your family will have to reduce your standard of living to the bare necessities of life?" Low-birth-weight babies often suffer from serious health problems and spend their first weeks or months in intensive care. About 8 percent of babies born in the United States are underweight at birth. Low birth weight is clinically defined as below 2,500 grams, or 5 pounds and 8 ounces. "It's important to understand the factors that make it more likely for a woman with lower socioeconomic conditions to have a baby at higher risk of complications and death," Mitchell said. Limitations of the study include the fact that it was a secondary analysis of data collected during a different study, and that the overall number of low-birth-weight babies was small, at 11. The researchers suggest that replicating this study in a larger group would be beneficial. The Ohio State researchers are working on another study looking at blood biomarkers that might better explain what biological changes could be at play, including inflammation, Mitchell said. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Diabetes raises risk for many cancers, but not most common malignant brain tumor COLUMBUS, Ohio - New research further illuminates the surprising relationship between blood sugar and brain tumors and could begin to shed light on how certain cancers develop. While many cancers are more common among those with diabetes, cancerous brain tumors called gliomas are less common among those with elevated blood sugar and diabetes, a study from The Ohio State University has found. The discovery builds on previous Ohio State research showing that high blood sugar appears to reduce a person's risk of a noncancerous brain tumor called meningioma. Both studies were led by Judith Schwartzbaum, an associate professor of epidemiology and a researcher in Ohio State's Comprehensive Cancer Center. The new glioma study appears in the journal Scientific Reports. "Diabetes and elevated blood sugar increase the risk of cancer at several sites including the colon, breast and bladder. But in this case, these rare malignant brain tumors are more common among people who have normal levels of blood glucose than those with high blood sugar or diabetes," Schwartzbaum said. "Our research raises questions that, when answered, will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in glioma development," she said. Glioma is one of the most common types of cancerous tumors originating in the brain. It begins in the cells that surround nerve cells and help them function. The disease is typically diagnosed in middle age. At present, there is no treatment that ensures long-term survival, but several potential options are being studied. The Scientific Reports paper included data from two large long-term studies. One, called AMORIS, included 528,580 Swedes. The second, Me-Can, consisted of 269,365 Austrians and Swedes. In all, 812 participants developed gliomas. Schwartzbaum and her collaborators evaluated blood sugar and diabetes data and its relationship to subsequent development of brain cancer and found that those with elevated blood sugar and diabetes had a lower risk of developing glioma. "This really prompts the question, 'Why is the association between blood glucose levels and brain cancer the opposite of that for several other cancerous tumors?" she said. The researchers found that this relationship was strongest within a year of cancer diagnosis. "This may suggest that the tumor itself affects blood glucose levels or that elevated blood sugar or diabetes may paradoxically be associated with a protective factor that reduces brain tumor risk," Schwartzbaum said. "For example, insulin-like growth factor is associated with glioma recurrence and is found in lower levels in people with diabetes than those who don't have the disease." The brain accounts for only about 2 percent of body weight, but consumes about 20 percent of the body's available glucose, Schwartzbaum said. The body of research on restrictive diets and their effect on brain cancer development has shown mixed results and more work is needed to determine if there's something about the sugar/tumor relationship that can be modified in a way that's beneficial to brain cancer patients, she said. The research was supported by the National Cancer Institute. Schwartzbaum's collaborators included co-lead author Michael Edlinger of the Medical University of Innsbruck in Austria and Grzegorz Rempala of Ohio State's College of Public Health.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Researchers are turning to cannabidiol to help cut seizures in half for those suffering from a severe form of epilepsy. In a new study presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s (ANN) Annual Meeting held April 22 to April 28, nearly 40 percent of people with Lennix-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) experienced a 50 percent reduction in drop seizures when taking a liquid form of cannabidiol, compared to the only 15 percent of patients taking a placebo. Cannabidiol is a molecule from the cannabis plant that does not have the psychoactive properties. In a drop seizure, a person collapses due to changes in muscle tone. While drop seizures are often very brief, they frequently lead to injury and emergency room visits. Patients with LGS, which begins in childhood, experience multiple kinds of seizures including drop seizures and tonic-clonic seizures, which involve the loss of consciousness and full-body convulsions. These are both difficult to control and do not respond well to medications. “Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizures that are otherwise difficult to control,” Dr. Anup Patel, an attending pediatric neurologist at Nationwide Children’s and assistant professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Neurology at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, said in a statement. The researchers followed 225 people who had an average of 85 drop seizures per month and had already tried an average of six epilepsy drugs that did not work. The patients in the study were taking an average of three epilepsy drugs during the study’s 14 weeks. The average age of the participants was 16. Each participant in the study was given either 20 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg daily of cannabidiol daily, or a placebo as an add-on to their current medications over the duration of the study. The patients in the higher dose group saw a 42 percent reduction in drop seizures overall and 40 percent saw their seizures reduced by at least 50 percent. The participants taking the lower dose had a 37 percent reduction overall and 36 percent of the participants saw a reduction of at least 50 percent. The placebo patients only had a 17 percent reduction in drop seizures and only 15 percent of the participants saw at least a 50 percent reduction. There were mild-to-moderate side effects, including decreased appetite and sleepiness for 94 percent of those taking the higher dose, 84 percent of those taking the lower dose and 72 percent of those taking the placebo. The cannabidiol patients were also up to 2.6 times more likely to say their overall condition improved than those receiving the placebo. Up to 66 percent of the cannabidiol patients reported improvement, compared to 44 percent of those receiving the placebo. “Our results suggest that cannabidiol may be effective for those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in treating drop seizures,” said Patel. “This is important because this kind of epilepsy is incredibly difficult to treat. “While there were more side effects for those taking cannabidiol, they were mostly well-tolerated,” he added. “I believe that it may become an important new treatment option for these patients.” The researchers plan to submit a New Drug Application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration later this year.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

One in 10 Americans screened said they sometimes smoked, study found COLUMBUS, Ohio - Social smokers' risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol is identical to those who light up every day, new research has found. This large, nationally representative study is the first to look at blood pressure and cholesterol in social smokers. More than 10 percent of 39,555 people surveyed said they were social smokers, meaning they didn't smoke every day. That's on top of the 17 percent who called themselves current smokers. Among current and social smokers (after researchers adjusted for differences in factors including demographics and obesity), about 75 percent had high blood pressure and roughly 54 percent had high cholesterol. "Not smoking at all is the best way to go. Even smoking in a social situation is detrimental to your cardiovascular health," said lead author Kate Gawlik, assistant professor of clinical nursing at The Ohio State University. "One in 10 people in this study said they sometimes smoke, and many of them are young and already on the path to heart disease," she said. Smoking is a risk factor for unhealthy blood pressure and cholesterol and both are significant contributors to cardiovascular disease, the leading killer of men and women worldwide. The study appears in the American Journal of Health Promotion "These are striking findings and they have such significance for clinical practice and for population health," said study senior author Bernadette Melnyk, dean of Ohio State's College of Nursing and chief wellness officer for the university. Melnyk said doctors and nurses should strive to identify social smokers and offer them advice and tools to quit smoking. "This has been a fairly neglected part of the population. We know that regular smoking is an addiction, but providers don't usually ask about social smoking," Melnyk said. "The typical question is 'Do you smoke or use tobacco?' And social smokers will usually say 'No'." Participants in the study were screened from February 2012 to February 2016 as part of Ohio State's Million Hearts educational program. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2012 launched Million Hearts, a five-year initiative to improve cardiovascular health co-led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Ohio State was the first university-wide partner. During the screenings, participants identified themselves as nonsmokers, current smokers or social smokers. The screenings also included measures of blood pressure and total cholesterol. Social smokers in the study were more likely to be younger (between 21 and 40 years old), male and Hispanic. After the researchers took into account demographic and biometric differences between the smokers and social smokers in the study, they found no difference in the risk of hypertension or high cholesterol. Social smokers were defined as those who do not smoke cigarettes daily, but who smoke in certain social situations regularly. The good news about this study is there's plenty of room for intervention and prevention of future death and disease, the researchers said. "Simple healthy lifestyle behavior changes including appropriate aspirin therapy, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, stress management and -- very importantly -- smoking cessation can do away with much of the risk of chronic disease," Melnyk said. The percentage of participants who called themselves "current smokers" was in line with estimates from the CDC, which reports that 17.8 percent of U.S. adults identify as smokers. Gawlik and Melnyk said those who consider themselves social smokers should be aware that the toll on their cardiovascular health could be just as great as if they smoked every day. And this study should prompt clinicians to rethink how they ask patients about smoking, they said. "Are you a smoker?" isn't likely to work with social smokers, because they don't think of themselves as addicted, Gawlik said. In the study, the researchers advise asking "Do you ever smoke cigarettes or use tobacco in social situations such as at bars, parties, work events or family gatherings?" Another option: "When was the last time you had a cigarette or used tobacco with friends?" Furthermore, clinicians working with smokers should be aware that cutting back on smoking isn't a good answer from a heart-health perspective. "Doctors and nurses need to educate patients that social smoking is still a major health risk and is not a long-term healthy choice," Gawlik said. Limitations of the study include the fact that the researchers don't have information about prior smoking behavior, just what the participants reported at the screenings. In addition, the screenings were open to people who chose to participate, meaning the study subjects were self-selected. Gawlik said she'd like to know more about how many of those who smoke socially go on to become everyday smokers. "That's a huge area for clinical intervention because you might be able to reach them before they're completely and totally addicted," she said. Ohio State has led a national effort through Million Hearts, which now has over 150 participating organizations and universities, to provide free education and support to health care providers, students and community members looking to reduce cardiovascular death and disease. More information is available at https:/


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Promising results from a large-scale, controlled, Phase 3 clinical study of epilepsy patients being treated with cannabidiol will be presented April 25 at the American Academy of Neurology’s Annual Meeting in Boston. GW Pharmaceuticals’ liquid oral formulation of cannabidiol (CBD), called Epidiolex, is one of 500 compounds found in cannabis. Unlike the well-known compound, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CBD does not produce a “high” as the psychoactive component is absent. Results from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study found that almost 40 percent of people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) had at least a 50 percent reduction in drop seizures, compared to 15 percent taking a placebo. LGS is a severe form of epilepsy that often results in impaired intellectual development and does not usually respond well to medications. “Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizure that are otherwise difficult to control,” study author Anup Patel, M.D., of Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine said in a prepared statement. The study involved 225 people, who for 14 weeks received either a daily higher dose of cannabidiol, a lower dose, or a placebo in addition to their current medications. The average age of participants was 16, and prior to the study all had an average of 85 drop seizures per month.  On average, participants had already tried six epilepsy drugs that were not successful, and continued to take about three epilepsy drugs during the study. Those taking the higher 20 mg/kg daily cannabidiol dose saw an overall 42 percent decrease in drop seizures. For 40 percent of the participants, seizures were reduced by 50 percent or more. Participants receiving the lower 10 mg/kg dose, saw an overall 37 percent decrease in drop seizures. A reduction of 50 percent or more was seen in 36 percent of patients. Comparatively, the placebo group experienced a 17 percent decrease in drop seizures, and seizures were cut in half or more for 15 percent of the participants. Side effects were more common in the higher dose groups, with 94 percent compared to 72 percent in those taking the placebo, but most were mild to moderate.  Decreased appetite and sleepiness were the two most common side effects. Participants receiving the CBD were more likely to report an improvement in overall condition, with 66 percent saying they had improved, compared to 44 percent of patients in the placebo group. “Our results suggest that cannabidiol may be effective for those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in treating drop seizures,” Patel said. “This is important because this kind of epilepsy is incredibly difficult to treat. While there were more side effects for those taking cannabidiol, they were mostly well-tolerated. I believe that it may become an important new treatment option for these patients.” A New Drug Application is expected to be submitted to the Food and Drug Administration later this year.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New insights into the impact forests have on surface temperature will provide a valuable tool in efforts to mitigate climate change, according to a new research paper co-authored by Clemson University scientist Thomas O'Halloran. For the first time, scientists have created a global map measuring the cooling effect forests generate by regulating the exchange of water and energy between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere. In many locations, this cooling effect works in concert with forests' absorption of carbon dioxide. By coupling information from satellites with local data from sensors mounted to research towers extending high above tree canopies, O'Halloran and his collaborators throughout the world have given a much more complete, diagnostic view of the roles forests play in regulating climate. Their findings have important implications for how and where different types of land cover can be used to mitigate climate change with forest protection programs and data-driven land-use policies. Results of their study were recently published in the journal Nature Climate Change. "It's our hope that such global maps can be used to optimize biophysics in addition to carbon when planning land-use climate change mitigation projects," said O'Halloran, assistant professor of Forestry and Environmental Conservation at Clemson's Baruch Institute of Coastal Ecology and Forest Science in Georgetown. Previously, scientists measured vegetation's impact on local land temperatures using satellite imagery, which is limited to only clear-sky days and few measurements per day, or they used local stations, which are limited in their reach. Integrating data from towers extending more than 100 feet in the air with satellite measurements allows for a more advanced view of the variables impacting surface temperature. The research team found that forests' cooling effect was greater than thought and most pronounced in mid- and low-latitude regions. This new statistical model of analyzing forests' impact on local temperature will allow communities around the world to pinpoint ideal locations for forest protection or reforestation efforts. "We wanted every country in the world to have some estimation of the cooling effects of forests and vegetation," O'Halloran said. "It's about optimizing the benefit of land management for climate change mitigation." A tower similar to those used for this study is under construction at Baruch in collaboration with the University of South Carolina to help provide greater analysis of local climate, he said. "The towers will really help us understand how ecosystems respond to change," O'Halloran said. "In South Carolina, we've had a lot of extreme weather events, droughts, flood and hurricanes. This will help us understand the resilience of local ecosystems to those types of events." O'Halloran co-authored the article in Nature Climate Change with lead author Ryan Bright of The Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research in Norway and several additional collaborators throughout Europe and the United States. Unlike local climate changes owed to global emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, local climate changes linked to land-related activities are unique in that they are only influenced by the local land-use policies that are in place, Bright said. "The results of our study now make it easier for individual nations or regions to begin measuring and enforcing climate policies resulting in tangible mitigation or adaptation benefits at the local scale," says Bright. "This is especially critical moving forward in a world facing increasing competition for land resources." Other research collaborators were Edouard Davin of the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science in Switzerland; Julia Pongratz of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Germany; Kaiguang Zhao of the School of Environment and Natural Resources at The Ohio State University; and Alessandro Cescatti of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Italy.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Whether rich or poor, one thing unites Americans of all economic classes: Our love for fast food. A new nationwide study of young baby boomers contradicts the popular belief that fast-food consumption is concentrated among the poor. Results showed that middle-income Americans were most likely to eat fast food, although the differences from other groups was relatively small. Even the richest people were only slightly less likely to report fast food consumption than others. "It's not mostly poor people eating fast food in America," said Jay Zagorsky, co-author of the study and research scientist at The Ohio State University's Center for Human Resource Research. "Rich people may have more eating options, but that's not stopping them from going to places like McDonald's or KFC." Zagorsky, who also has an appointment with the Ohio Education Research Center, conducted the study with Patricia Smith of the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Their study was recently published online and will appear in the November 2017 issue of the journal Economics and Human Biology. The researchers used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, which has questioned the same group of randomly selected Americans since 1979. The NLSY is conducted by Ohio State's Center for Human Resource Research. In the study, Zagorsky and Smith used data from about 8,000 people who were asked about their fast-food consumption in the 2008, 2010 and 2012 surveys. Participants, who were in their 40s and 50s at the time of the surveys, were asked how many times in the past seven days they had eaten "food from a fast-food restaurant such as McDonald's, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Pizza Hut or Taco Bell." Results were compared with the participants' answers to questions about their wealth and income. While there were some slight differences in how wealth and income were related to fast-food consumption, Zagorsky said the results were similar. Overall, 79 percent of respondents ate fast food at least once and 23 percent ate three or more meals during any one of the weeks recorded in the study. In one analysis, the researchers divided the participants into 10 groups based on income. About 80 percent of those in the lowest 10 percent of income ate at least once at a fast-food restaurant, compared to about 85 percent of those who were ranked near the middle (40 to 50 percent) in terms of income. Of the richest 10 percent, about 75 percent reported eating at least one fast-food meal. The number of fast-food meals eaten during the three weeks of the study showed a similar pattern. The lowest 10 percent in terms of income ate about 3.6 fast-food meals during the three weeks of the survey, compared to about 4.2 meals for middle-income people and three meals for the richest 10 percent of participants. Another key finding was that people whose income or wealth changed dramatically during the four years of the study - either going way up or way down - didn't change their eating habits. "If you became richer or poorer, it didn't change how much fast food you ate," Zagorsky said. One hallmark of the heavy users of fast food was a lack of time. The study found that fast-food eaters tended to have less leisure time because they were more likely to work and work more hours than non-fast-food eaters. The researchers also found an interesting tidbit that should be of interest to people who saw the 2004 documentary Supersize Me. In the movie, Morgan Spurlock documented what happened to his body when he ate nothing but McDonald's for 30 days. "I thought that was just a publicity stunt, but we found real people out there who seem to eat all their meals at fast-food restaurants," Zagorsky said. In 2008, 10 respondents claimed to eat three times a day at fast-food restaurants, as did five people in 2010 and two in 2012. Given that about 8,000 people participated in the survey, that suggests there may be quite a few people in the United States who go through periods of time during which they eat only fast food, Zagorsky said. Zagorsky cautioned that there are some limitations to the study. For one, the participants were not asked what they ate at the fast-food restaurants. Some may choose healthier options such as salads, or they may sometimes just go for a cup of coffee. Also, this study included only people in their 40s or 50s. Consumption habits may be different for people at different ages. Zagorsky said he hopes the results of this study can help guide policymakers when they come up with laws regarding how to prevent obesity or guide nutritional choices for Americans. "If government wants to get involved in regulating nutrition and food choices, it should be based on facts. This study helps reject the myth that poor people eat more fast food than others and may need special protection," he said.


You've probably already seen The Oatmeal comic in your social media feed several times now. Its beautiful illustrations are paired with an elegant, clever explanation about something called the "backfire effect." Basically, it describes why people double down on their beliefs when presented with contradictory information. SEE ALSO: What Facebook must do to prepare its 3,000 new moderators for the trauma they'll face The cartoon is powerful because we can all relate to that feeling of using facts to inform a heated political debate or sway someone's opinion and getting nowhere. And that's exactly the problem the comic's author, Matthew Inman, wanted to address, especially in the wake of Donald Trump's election. The only problem is that political scientists aren't sure the backfire effect is a real thing, and if it does exist, it may be rare. We know what you're thinking: Why do the fact police have to ruin the best thing that happened to your social media feed all week? The cartoon is pretty, funny, smart, and even hopeful about the importance of finding common ground when we vehemently disagree. That's all great stuff, and very important. But what you should keep in mind while reading the cartoon is that the backfire effect can be hard to replicate in rigorous research. So hard, in fact, that a large-scale, peer-reviewed study presented last August at the American Political Science Association’s annual conference couldn't reproduce the findings of the high-profile 2010 study that documented backfire effect. Tom Wood and Ethan Porter, political scientists and assistant professors at The Ohio State University and George Washington University, respectively, and co-authors of the recent study, say they came to the subject of backfire effect as "acolytes." They found this particular explanation of human behavior so compelling that they wanted to dedicate a good portion of their research to understanding and identifying it. So they challenged 8,100 people's knowledge of abortion, gun violence, undocumented immigration, fracking pollution, and dozens of other issues that stir intense emotions. But study participants didn't demonstrate the tendency to embrace falsehoods even more after being told the truth. Technically, they did observe a backfire effect when people were questioned about the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, but even that finding came with caveats because of the question's complicated wording. "We were desperately looking for any evidence ... and to our dismay it’s impossible to replicate," says Wood. This is important, Wood and Porter say, because if the backfire effect exists, it means something really depressing about our politics. After all, if sharing objective facts with someone leads them to believe the falsities you challenge more intensely, then what's the point? "If we believe that everybody is backfiring all the time, there’s very little hope for political engagement," says Porter. Now, this doesn't mean that Inman's comic is inherently wrong. Brendan Nyhan, the political scientist who co-authored the 2010 study, has found evidence in subsequent research that people may insist on false beliefs despite being presented with new information. At the same time, Nyhan has since collaborated with Porter and Wood on research that shows fact-checking can be effective. Whether or not there is a backfire effect, the behavior Inman describes is real; political scientists know it as motivated reasoning and confirmation bias. These well-researched psychological phenomena mean that we can be prone to choosing information and data that support our worldview while diminishing or dismissing evidence that contradicts it. To be clear, that's a lot different than learning something is false and endorsing that lie or half-truth even more. Moreover, Porter and Wood's study indicates people do actually heed corrective information. Fun comic - labeled as being about the backfire effect, but really considers disconfirmation bias more generally https://t.co/UWRAjVMlYi The trouble is that even when we learn that something is false, we may be able to acknowledge those facts without changing our political position accordingly. A person's political identity, say Porter and Wood, isn't easily influenced by learning, for example, that Trump routinely spreads false information about pretty much everything, or that Hillary Clinton has told her share of half-truths.  You can sum up that tension like this, says Wood: "My guy happened to tell a fib — sure no one is perfect — but I’m not going to go out and vote for the other guy."  That still leaves the rest of us trying to figure out how to talk through our dueling beliefs, which is where Inman's comic shines. "The emotional core of this is about this idea of how we resist things and how do we get [people] to soften," he says.  Inman knows from his own experience on the internet that marshaling all the facts in the world can't, for example, convince some people that climate change is real.  If the backfire effect is real, nihilism might be the most appropriate response to the prospect of influencing anyone's attitudes or beliefs with facts.  But Inman rejects that approach and instead invokes our common humanity and ends with a bipartisan plea to listen. "I'm not here to take control of the wheel," he writes. "Or to tell you what to believe. I'm just here to tell you that it's okay to stop. To listen. To change."  Those common sense words of wisdom are the best part of the comic, and you don't really need science to confirm that the ability to listen and change is essential to a more civil, informed politics.  WATCH: This mobile solar-powered robot 3D printed an entire building in under 14 hours


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry, the Research Triangle’s premier family-oriented multi-specialty dental practice, has opened an office in Mebane on March 6th, 2017. The office will be located at 1931 South NC Highway 119, Mebane, NC 27302, and can be reached at (336) 792-3747. Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry, founded by Dr. Michael Riccobene in 2000, prides itself on its patient-centric care, state of the art dental technology, and commitment to ongoing education for all of its dental staff. Building on these values, Riccobene Associates has grown from one to thirteen locations, earning “Best Dentist in Wake and Johnson Counties” awards from Angie’s List and Cary Magazine for more than 10 years. “Our priority is providing gentle, trusted dental care and treatment that meets our patients’ needs and fits in their budgets,” explains Dr. Riccobene. “We’re excited to bring a different kind of dentistry to our new neighbors in Mebane.” The Mebane office of Riccobene Associates will focus on comprehensive dental care, including general, cosmetic, and sedation dentistry. However, patients who need specialty care will have access to the full suite of services Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry provides, including orthodontics and endodontics, at its network of practices in the Research Triangle area. Dr. Anthony DeStefano, DMD, will be the lead dentist at Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry’s Mebane practice. A native of Pennsylvania, Dr. DeStefano earned his DMD from the prestigious University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, and completed additional post-graduate work at The Ohio State University Medical Center. After operating private practices in Pennsylvania and Morrisville, Dr. DeStefano is thrilled to be part of a larger dental team providing patient-centric care to North Carolinians. Although he’s lived in North Carolina for several years with his wife and son, he’s excited to get to know Mebane--and all his new patients--better. For additional information, contact: Jeff Kovatch Director of Marketing and Development Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry (973) 809-5466 Cell jeff.kovatch(at)brushandfloss.com


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Toddlers who go to bed at regular times, and are better able to control and regulate their own emotions, are less likely to develop into obese pre-teens. This is according to a study led by Sarah Anderson of The Ohio State University College of Public Health, in Springer Nature's International Journal of Obesity. It is the first study to investigate how young children's experience of household routines relate to their self-regulation, and chances of being obese by their late childhood years. Anderson's research team investigated whether emotional and cognitive self-regulation are related to household routines in early childhood, and if both self-regulation and routines predict later obesity. They analyzed information of 10,955 children collected in the Millennium Cohort Study, a prospective, longitudinal study of a representative sample of children born in the UK between September 2000 and January 2002. When the children were three years old, their parents reported whether they had regular bedtimes and mealtimes and noted how much television or videos they watched. The parents also answered a questionnaire to assess the children's levels of emotional and cognitive self-regulation. When the children turned eleven, they were weighed and measured. Their levels of obesity were defined according to international criteria. The researchers established a link between emotional self-regulation and household routines at the age of three. This is consistent with previous research showing that children's emotional regulation develops within a family context that includes routines. Emotional self-regulation and one of the three household routines in early childhood were independent predictors of obesity at age eleven. In particular, Anderson's team found that children who always went to bed at the same time each night had a statistically significant lower risk of becoming obese compared to others. This finding adds to a growing body of literature on the importance of adequate sleep for childhood obesity prevention. "We found a stepwise relationship between regularity of bedtime and risk for obesity; compared to 'always' having a regular bedtime, even children who 'usually' had a regular bedtime had a statistically significantly elevated risk for obesity and the risk for obesity was even higher in children with inconsistent bedtimes," explains Anderson. "Children who have a regular bedtime routine also have earlier bedtimes, sleep more, fall asleep faster, have fewer nighttime awakenings, and are less likely to have behavior problems." Their findings also shed light on the role that a family's socioeconomic context in terms of parental education and household income plays in a child's development. It predicts whether preschool-aged children will have routines around bedtime, mealtime, and limits on screen time. "Parenting is more challenging when resources are limited; in addition to fewer routines and less structure, children living in poverty are more likely to experience the types of parental interactions that can undermine attachment security," Anderson notes. Reference: Anderson, S. E. et al (2017). Self-regulation and household routines at age three and obesity at age eleven: longitudinal analyses of the UK Millennium Cohort Study, International Journal of Obesity DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2017.94.


-- NeWave Sensor Solutions, LLC, Corporation, is excited to announce their patented Smart Shelf system was selected by the Discovery Channel as a new technology that will impact our future. NeWave's Smart Shelf is the only RFID "no tags required" real time on shelf inventory availability solution available.  As a segment of a new Discovery program:, NeWave's Smart Shelf system was highlighted in the segmentlaunched on the Discovery.com web site and Face book pages in April. The Discovery program was sponsored by DeVry University.The new web program launched by the Discovery Channel features new technologies that they believe will have a significant impact on our future. These include Wearable technologies, Home Automation, Drones, and Self Driving Cars. The segment on Cashier Free Retailers was developed to highlight technologies that will allow retailers to automate operations and focus their employees more on improving customer serviceNeWave's Smart Shelf system provides information on shelf item movement to prevent merchandise out of stocks using its unique patented Wave® RFID antenna technology. In simple terms, when an item leaves the shelf, NeWave's Smart Shelf sees it even when it is not tagged. Based on criteria set by the retailer for low inventory limits, the Smart Shelf software signals an alert in real time that can be sent on-site to store managers, or remotely to merchandising and loss prevention personnel as well as suppliers. There is no need to tag items, so you get all the benefits of the solution, without the added labor, item tag and maintenance costs.  The Smart Shelf can also trigger a retailer designated alarm message and a video capture alert within the store that enables theft prevention. The system strives to make it easy to get real time in or low on-shelf stock information anytime to any authorized person or group via any smart device"We are thrilled to be recognized as a leading technology for the future of retailing", stated Dr. Den Burnside, CTO and Founder of NeWave Sensor Solutions. He also added," This along with our Consumer Electronic Show Award in 2016 for engineering innovation certainly reinforces our direction in providing a game changing RFID solution."The Smart Shelf is the first system/technology to provide on shelf merchandise availability without the need for tagging the products on the shelf, greatly lowering use costs while eliminating out-of-stock using real-time restocking information before the last item is removed from the shelf.. The award winning Smart Shelf will be showcased at RFID Live in Phoenix on          May 9-11 in Booth 101.NeWave Sensor Solutions is a leading provider of optimized solutions for today's most challenging item-level Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) problems. The company develops industry-standard RFID technology based on the patented Wave Antenna that sets a new standard for accuracy, versatility and efficiency. The Wave is the first and only antenna specifically designed to be used only for item-level RFID solutions. NeWave's core technology was developed by the world-class ElectroScience Laboratory (ESL) of The Ohio State University, a pioneer in RF research and development under the direction of NeWave's Chief Technical Officer (CTO), and is produced in partnership with Wistron NeWeb Corporation (WNC), the Taiwan-based global leader in antenna manufacturing. NeWave's management team leverages a strong technical and international business heritage in a variety of industries for accomplishing its mission of providing optimized solutions to today's greatest RFID challenges. For more information, please visit us at www.newaverfid.com . *NeWave®, Wave® and Smart Shelf™ are trademarks of NeWave Sensor Solutions, LLC Plain City (Columbus), Ohio USA+++


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

COLUMBUS, Ohio--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Lane Bryant, the nation's leading women's plus size apparel brand, is thrilled to announce that the brand has raised $331K in donations for Columbus-based Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Throughout Lane Bryant’s Inspired to Give campaign, the brand raised both donations and awareness for the hospital and its services through a variety of initiatives in stores and online. The brand offered exclusive coupon books for a $5 donation, as well as a register round-up in store. Clients were able to “round-up” their purchase to the nearest dollar for donation, or had the option to contribute a flat donation to Nationwide Children’s. “We are grateful to have the support of Lane Bryant,” said Nationwide Children’s Hospital Foundation President Jim Digan. “The company’s leadership and associates are so dedicated to helping Nationwide Children’s improve lives for children and families across the country. They selflessly made great things happen for folks they will never meet.” The brand also partnered with Nationwide Children’s on a special campaign video, that showed members of the dance company Pretty BIG Movement (who also appear in Lane Bryant’s Inspired by #ThisBody initiative) teaming up with several Nationwide Children’s Hospital Patient Champions. The video, as well as several images from the shoot, were shared across Lane Bryant’s digital channels throughout the Inspired to Give campaign. For more information on Lane Bryant, please visit www.lanebryant.com. About Lane Bryant®: Lane Bryant® is the nation's leading women's specialty size apparel brand, providing stylish and high-quality fashion in sizes 14-28. The Lane Bryant collection includes a wide selection of career to fashion conscious apparel as well as accessories, footwear, hosiery and Cacique® intimate apparel. Lane Bryant® fashions are available nationwide at its 769 Lane Bryant stores, and online. Lane Bryant is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ascena Retail Group, Inc. (Nasdaq: ASNA). Please visit lanebryant.com and cacique.com for store locations and the latest fashion trend information. About Nationwide Children’s Hospital: Named to the Top 10 Honor Roll on U.S. News & World Report’s 2016-17 list of “America’s Best Children’s Hospitals,” Nationwide Children’s Hospital is America’s largest not-for-profit freestanding pediatric healthcare system providing wellness, preventive, diagnostic, treatment and rehabilitative care for infants, children and adolescents, as well as adult patients with congenital disease. Nationwide Children’s has a staff of more than 11,000 providing state-of-the-art pediatric care during more than 1.2 million patient visits annually. As home to the Department of Pediatrics of The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Nationwide Children’s physicians train the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists. The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is one of the Top 10 National Institutes of Health-funded freestanding pediatric research facilities. More information is available at NationwideChildrens.org.


BOSTON - Taking cannabidiol may cut seizures in half for some children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a severe form of epilepsy, according to new information released today from a large scale controlled clinical study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. Cannabidiol is a molecule from the cannabis plant that does not have the psychoactive properties that create a "high." Nearly 40 percent of people with LGS, which starts in childhood, had at least a 50 percent reduction in drop seizures when taking a liquid form of cannabidiol compared to 15 percent taking a placebo. When someone has a drop seizure, their muscle tone changes, causing them to collapse. Children and adults with LGS have multiple kinds of seizures, including drop seizures and tonic-clonic seizures, which involve loss of consciousness and full-body convulsions. The seizures are hard to control and usually do not respond well to medications. Intellectual development is usually impaired in people with LGS. Although the drop seizures of LGS are often very brief, they frequently lead to injury and trips to the hospital emergency room, so any reduction in drop seizure frequency is a benefit. "Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizures that are otherwise difficult to control," said study author Anup Patel, MD, of Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. For the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, researchers followed 225 people with an average age of 16 for 14 weeks. The participants had an average of 85 drop seizures per month, had already tried an average of six epilepsy drugs that did not work for them and were taking an average of three epilepsy drugs during the study. Participants were given either a higher dose of 20 mg/kg daily cannabidiol, a lower dose of 10 mg/kg daily cannabidiol or placebo as an add-on to their current medications for 14 weeks. Those taking the higher dose had a 42 percent reduction in drop seizures overall, and for 40 percent, their seizures were reduced by half or more. Those taking the lower dose had a 37 percent reduction in drop seizures overall, and for 36 percent, seizures were reduced by half or more. Those taking the placebo had a 17 percent reduction in drop seizures, and for 15 percent, seizures were reduced by half or more. There were side effects for 94 percent of those taking the higher dose, 84 percent of those taking the lower dose and 72 percent of those taking placebo, but most side effects were reported as mild to moderate. The two most common were decreased appetite and sleepiness. Those receiving cannabidiol were up to 2.6 times more likely to say their overall condition had improved than those receiving the placebo, with up to 66 percent reporting improvement compared to 44 percent of those receiving the placebo. "Our results suggest that cannabidiol may be effective for those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in treating drop seizures," said Patel. "This is important because this kind of epilepsy is incredibly difficult to treat. While there were more side effects for those taking cannabidiol, they were mostly well-tolerated. I believe that it may become an important new treatment option for these patients." There is currently a plan to submit a New Drug Application to the FDA later this year. The study was supported by GW Pharmaceuticals, developer of cannabidiol. In the United States, GW operates as Greenwich Biosciences Inc. Learn more about epilepsy at http://www. . The American Academy of Neurology is the world's largest association of neurologists and neuroscience professionals, with 32,000 members. The AAN is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, concussion, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www. or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube. Dr. Patel will present his findings at 5:45 p.m. ET, on Tuesday, April 25, 2017, in Room 210AB of the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. Please contact Renee Tessman, rtessman@aan.com, to schedule an advance interview. To access Non-Emerging Science abstracts to be presented at the 2017 AAN Annual Meeting, visit https:/ . Emerging Science abstracts are embargoed until 12:01 a.m., ET, Friday, April 21, 2017, unless otherwise noted by the Academy's Media and Public Relations Department.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

COLUMBUS, OH, May 08, 2017-- Francille Maloch Firebaugh is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dr. Firebaugh a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Dr. Firebaugh celebrates many years' experience in her professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes she has accrued in her field.A prominent and lauded figure in her field, Dr. Firebaugh currently serves as the vice provost for land grant affairs emerita, dean emerita, and professor emerita for the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University. In 1988 she was named Vice provost and Professor Emerita by The Ohio State University.In addition to her status as Lifetime Achiever, Dr. Firebaugh has previously received the Lifetime Achievement Award from The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, the Distinguished Service Award, from the American Association of Family & Consumer Sciences, the Alice H. Cook & Constance Cook Award from Cornell University and the Distinguished Service Award from Ohio State University. A Paul Harris Fellow of Rotary International, Dr. Firebaugh has been a featured listee in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in American Education, Who's Who in the East, Who's Who in the Midwest and Who's Who of American Women.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


With the addition of Founds the Columbus Umbaugh office now has nine finance professionals. The office opened in May of 2015. Umbaugh advises cities, towns, townships, counties, utilities, schools, libraries, hospitals and airports regarding financing, long-range planning, tax and utility rates, budgets, debt management, revenue forecasts, economic development and financial management. Founds is a past member of boards of directors including the Government Finance Officers Association and the Ohio Association of School Business Officials. Founds has been professionally recognized receiving: Founds is a registered municipal advisor and has served as a senior public finance investment banker for a regional broker dealer and a national banking corporation. He maintains securities licenses Series 7, 21, 50, 53, 66 and an Ohio school treasurer license. Founds earned a Bachelor of Science in business administration with a finance concentration from The Ohio State University (1986.) He has two Masters Degrees – an MBA (2004,) and Education (1997) from Ashland University, Ashland, Ohio. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ohio-school-finance-professional-named-director-ohio-education-finance-for-umbaugh-columbus-office-300445944.html


When someone has a drop seizure, their muscle tone changes, causing them to collapse. Children and adults with LGS have multiple kinds of seizures, including drop seizures and tonic-clonic seizures, which involve loss of consciousness and full-body convulsions. The seizures are hard to control and usually do not respond well to medications. Intellectual development is usually impaired in people with LGS. Although the drop seizures of LGS are often very brief, they frequently lead to injury and trips to the hospital emergency room, so any reduction in drop seizure frequency is a benefit. "Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizures that are otherwise difficult to control," said study author Anup Patel, MD, of Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus, and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. For the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, researchers followed 225 people with an average age of 16 for 14 weeks. The participants had an average of 85 drop seizures per month, had already tried an average of six epilepsy drugs that did not work for them and were taking an average of three epilepsy drugs during the study. Participants were given either a higher dose of 20 mg/kg daily cannabidiol, a lower dose of 10 mg/kg daily cannabidiol or placebo as an add-on to their current medications for 14 weeks. Those taking the higher dose had a 42 percent reduction in drop seizures overall, and for 40 percent, their seizures were reduced by half or more. Those taking the lower dose had a 37 percent reduction in drop seizures overall, and for 36 percent, seizures were reduced by half or more. Those taking the placebo had a 17 percent reduction in drop seizures, and for 15 percent, seizures were reduced by half or more. There were side effects for 94 percent of those taking the higher dose, 84 percent of those taking the lower dose and 72 percent of those taking placebo, but most side effects were reported as mild to moderate. The two most common were decreased appetite and sleepiness. Those receiving cannabidiol were up to 2.6 times more likely to say their overall condition had improved than those receiving the placebo, with up to 66 percent reporting improvement compared to 44 percent of those receiving the placebo. "Our results suggest that cannabidiol may be effective for those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in treating drop seizures," said Patel. "This is important because this kind of epilepsy is incredibly difficult to treat. While there were more side effects for those taking cannabidiol, they were mostly well-tolerated. I believe that it may become an important new treatment option for these patients." There is currently a plan to submit a New Drug Application to the FDA later this year. The study was supported by GW Pharmaceuticals, developer of cannabidiol. In the United States, GW operates as Greenwich Biosciences Inc. Learn more about epilepsy at www.aan.com/patients. The American Academy of Neurology is the world's largest association of neurologists and neuroscience professionals, with 32,000 members. The AAN is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, concussion, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cannabis-based-medicine-may-cut-seizures-in-half-for-those-with-tough-to-treat-epilepsy-300441939.html


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

With more than 300 VIPs in attendance and thanks to sponsors such as Moët Hennessy and Delta, this year's gala raised more money for the Jesse Owens Foundation than ever before. Proceeds raised from the gala benefit the Jesse Owens Foundation which provides future generations with resources to help develop their talents, broaden their horizons and help them become better citizens. On April 26, 2017, the Jesse Owens Foundation hosted a VIP Cocktail Reception at the New York Athletic Club to jumpstart the celebration. Guests included members of Muhammad Ali's family, Herb Douglas Jr., and Rodney Williams, CMO of Moët Hennessy. About the International Athletic Association The International Athletic Association (IAA) is a non-profit organization established to promote and to encourage universal values of fairness, integrity, uncompromising sportsmanship and excellence in athletic competition. Committed to keeping alive the spirit, heart, and qualities of world renowned US Olympian, Jesse Owens, the IAA hosts the Jesse Owens International Trophy Award Gala to support youth and aspiring Olympic athletes. The International Athletic Association (IAA) was co-founded by US Olympian Herbert Douglas Jr., to honor his friend and mentor, Jesse Owens. About the Jesse Owens Foundation  The Jesse Owens Foundation is a non-profit organization whose goal is to promote the development of youth to their fullest potential. Established in 1980 by friends and family after the untimely death of Jesse Owens, the foundation perpetuates the ideals and life's work of this Olympic champion and humanitarian. The Jesse Owens Foundation seeks to perpetuate the spirit and beliefs of Jesse Owens through its support of The Ruth and Jesse Owens Scholars Program at The Ohio State University. This program provides services to graduating high school seniors with untapped potential to develop their talents, broaden their horizons, and to help them become better citizens. Currently, The Foundation serves as a resource for information and referral on the life and legacy of Jesse Owens and provides its services on a competitive basis without regard for race, creed, color, national origin, or sex. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sports-icons-and-influencers-come-together-to-support-the-jesse-owens-foundation-300452373.html


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The NCCN Radiation Therapy Compendium™ provides guidance on all RT modalities recommended within the NCCN Guidelines, including Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT), Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS)/Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)/Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR), Image-guided Radiotherapy (IGRT), Low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR)/High dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR), Radioisotope, and Particle Therapy. Transparency of NCCN Guidelines and Compendia development is central to the philosophy, policies, and procedures of NCCN. NCCN posts the policies and processes for developing and maintaining the NCCN Guidelines. These policies are available to the public on the NCCN website. Identification of newly published research, NCCN Member Institution review, external stakeholder submissions, and panel review occur on an ongoing basis with at least annual review performed for NCCN Guidelines for each disease. The NCCN Guidelines are the recognized standard for clinical policy in cancer care and are the most thorough and most frequently updated clinical practice guidelines available in any area of medicine. Other NCCN Guidelines derivative products include: For more information and to access the NCCN Radiation Therapy Compendium™, visit NCCN.org/RTCompendium. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 of the world's leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nine-new-disease-sites-added-to-the-nccn-radiation-therapy-compendium-300441832.html


The survey was conducted during the period of congressional debate over the American Health Care Act (AHCA), which was withdrawn the afternoon of March 24 when it became clear there were not enough votes to pass the legislation. Responding to the survey were 76 oncology professionals, including physicians, academic and community; nurses; physician assistants; pharmacists; industry professionals; payers and patient advocates. "The American Health Care Act is tabled and the ACA remains in place, but concerns about access to cancer screening, care, and research funding remain. Today, patients are in limbo, not knowing what action the federal and state governments will take," said Robert W. Carlson, MD, Chief Executive Officer of NCCN. "NCCN agrees there are ways to improve the current health care system for Americans with cancer, the clinical professionals who care for them, and payers. However, we are concerned for Americans with cancer that affordability, coverage of products and services in cancer treatment, and overall access will be impeded by allowing health insurers to set their own rates, or by providing states the ability to experiment with Medicaid coverage, without appropriate patient protections." "President Trump included three key elements in his approach to health coverage reform: repairing necessary aspects of the ACA, ensuring greater access, and lowering the total cost of care," Dr. Carlson said. "We are ready to share our Network's expertise with lawmakers to deliver a value-based health policy to ensure that all Americans with cancer have access to high-quality, effective, and efficient cancer care." Below is a link to Dr. Carlson's March 21, 2017 letter to Congress outlining NCCN's concerns about the health policy proposal and patient access to care: https://www.nccn.org/professionals/meetings/oncology_policy_program/pdf/2017_NCCN_AHCA_Letter_Walden_03-22-2017.pdf For more information about NCCN's health care policy initiatives, visit NCCN.org/policy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 of the world's leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nccn-survey-reveals-oncologys-concerns-about-financial-distress-patient-access-to-care-300441795.html

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