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Zhu F.,Yale University | Padmanabhan N.,Yale University | Ross A.J.,The Ohio State University | Zhao G.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Zhao G.,University of Portsmouth
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society | Year: 2016

Large redshift surveys capable of measuring the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal have proven to be an effective way of measuring the distance-redshift relation in cosmology. Building off the work in Zhu et al., we develop a technique to directly constrain the distance- redshift relation from BAO measurements without splitting the sample into redshift bins. We apply the redshift weighting technique in Zhu et al. to the clustering of galaxies from 1000 Quick particle mesh (QPM) mock simulations after reconstruction and achieve a 0.75 per cent measurement of the angular diameter distance DA at z = 0.64 and the same precision for Hubble parameter H at z = 0.29. These QPM mock catalogues mimic the clustering and noise level of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12). We compress the correlation functions in the redshift direction on to a set of weighted correlation functions. These estimators give unbiased DA and H measurements across the entire redshift range of the combined sample. We demonstrate the effectiveness of redshift weighting in improving the distance and Hubble parameter estimates. Instead of measuring at a single 'effective' redshift as in traditional analyses, we report our DA and H measurements at all redshifts. The measured fractional error of DA ranges from 1.53 per cent at z = 0.2 to 0.75 per cent at z = 0.64. The fractional error of H ranges from 0.75 per cent at z = 0.29 to 2.45 per cent at z = 0.7. Our measurements are consistent with a Fisher forecast to within 10-20 per cent depending on the pivot redshift.We further showthe results are robust against the choice of fiducial cosmologies, galaxy bias models, and redshift-space distortions streaming parameters. © 2016 The Authors.


PubMed | University of Cincinnati, The Ohio State University, Ohio State University and Beni Suef University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Vaccine | Year: 2015

The ectodomain of the influenza matrix protein 2 (M2e) is highly conserved across strains and has been shown to be a promising candidate for universal influenza vaccine in the mouse model. In this study, we tested immune response and protective efficacy of a chimeric norovirus P particle containing the avian M2e protein against challenges with three avian influenza (AI) viruses (H5N2, H6N2, H7N2) in chickens. Two-week-old specific pathogen free chickens were vaccinated 3 times with an M2e-P particle (M2e-PP) vaccine via the subcutaneous (SQ) route with oil adjuvant, and transmucosal routes (intranasal, IN; eye drop, ED; microspray, MS) without adjuvant. M2e-PP vaccination via the SQ route induced significant IgG antibody responses which were increased by each booster vaccination. In groups vaccinated via IN, ED or MS, neither IgG nor IgA responses were detected from sera or nasal washes of immunized birds. The M2e-PP vaccination via the SQ route significantly reduced the virus shedding in the trachea and the cloaca for all three challenge viruses. Despite the absence of detectable IgG and IgA responses in birds vaccinated with the M2e-PP via intranasal routes, a similar level of reduction in virus shedding was observed in the IN group compared to the SQ group. Our results supports that the universal vaccine approach using M2e-based vaccine can provide cross-protection against challenge viruses among different HA subtypes although the efficacy of the vaccine should be enhanced further to be practical. Better understanding of the protective immune mechanism will be critical for the development of an M2e-based vaccine in chickens.


PubMed | The Ohio State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Gynecologic oncology | Year: 2016

The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family of enzymes is important in several DNA repair pathways. Drugs that inhibit these enzymes have been investigated in many types of cancer, but their application in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies has rapidly evolved - as manifested by the 2014 FDA approval for olaparib in the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer associated with a germline BRCA mutation (gBRCA). In efforts to broaden their efficacy, current clinical trials have demonstrated benefit of olaparib, and other PARP inhibitors (PARPi), as single agents and in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy and biologic agents, in wide ranging populations. Although the majority of data for PARPi in gynecologic malignancies has been specifically regarding ovarian cancer, their role in the treatment of uterine and cervical cancer is currently being investigated. This review will serve as a synopsis of seminal trials to date, summarize the breadth of clinical application in on-going studies, query how these results may change future practice, and reflect on questions yet to be answered.


The inference of the evolutionary history of a collection of organisms is a problem of fundamental importance in evolutionary biology. The abundance of DNA sequence data arising from genome sequencing projects has led to significant challenges in the inference of these phylogenetic relationships. Among these challenges is the inference of the evolutionary history of a collection of species based on sequence information from several distinct genes sampled throughout the genome. It is widely accepted that each individual gene has its own phylogeny, which may not agree with the species tree. Many possible causes of this gene tree incongruence are known. The best studied is the incomplete lineage sorting, which is commonly modeled by the coalescent process. Numerous methods based on the coalescent process have been proposed for the estimation of the phylogenetic species tree given DNA sequence data. However, use of these methods assumes that the phylogenetic species tree can be identified from DNA sequence data at the leaves of the tree, although this has not been formally established. We prove that the unrooted topology of the n-leaf phylogenetic species tree is generically identifiable given observed data at the leaves of the tree that are assumed to have arisen from the coalescent process under a time-reversible substitution process with the possibility of site-specific rate variation modeled by the discrete gamma distribution and a proportion of invariable sites.


PubMed | University of California at Riverside, The Ohio State University, Texas A&M University, University of Zaragoza and 5 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal on intellectual and developmental disabilities | Year: 2016

The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT modeling and a nationally representative standardization sample, the item set was reduced to 75 items that provide the most precise adaptive behavior information at the cutoff area determining the presence or not of significant adaptive behavior deficits across conceptual, social, and practical skills. The standardization of the DABS is described and discussed.


PubMed | University of Minnesota, University of Washington, Baylor College of Medicine, The Ohio State University and 3 more.
Type: | Journal: PLoS currents | Year: 2014

This study sought to compare the effectiveness and safety of an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) (lisinopril) vs. an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) (losartan) for the treatment of cardiomyopathy (CM) in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).Development of CM is universal in boys with DMD. ACE-I and ARB have both been suggested as effective treatment options. ARBs have been associated with skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of DMD. The question of which, if either, is more effective for CM treatment in DMD remains. The purpose of this multicenter double-blind prospective study was to compare efficacy and safety of lisinopril versus losartan in the treatment of newly diagnosed CM in boys with DMD.Echocardiographic technician inter- and intraobserver variability were tested on 2 separate days on 2 different boys with DMD CM. Results were compared with paired t-testing. Twenty-two boys with newly diagnosed DMD CM (echocardiographic ejection fraction (EF) 10% EF drop. Three boys in the aCE-I group had 3 visits, due to study funding termination. Two were withdrawn because of low EF. All their data are included in the analysis for as long as they remained in the study. Mean EFs were similar at baseline (47.5%- ACE-I, 48.4%- ARB). After 1 year each group significantly improved to 54.6% and 55.2% respectively (p=.02). There was no difference between the 2 treatment groups at 1 year.Inter-observer and intra-observer reliability studies showed no differences between echocardiographers on serial examinations. EF improved equally in the two groups. There is no therapeutic difference in EF improvement between lisinopril and losartan over the one-year duration for treatment of boys with DMD-related CM.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01982695.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (http://www. ) -- Galaxies formed and grew billions of years ago by accumulating gas from their surroundings, or colliding and merging with other young galaxies. These early stages of galaxy assembly are believed to be accompanied by episodes of rapid star formation, known as starbursts, and rapid growth of a single super-massive black hole in the galactic centers. A popular paradigm for this evolution has the black holes growing mostly in obscurity, buried deep within the dusty gas. These are rich star-forming galaxies until a blowout of gas and dust (outflow) extinguishes the star formation and halts further growth in the black holes. The outflow then reveals a luminous, rapidly growing black hole in the galactic nucleus. These are known as quasars. Quasars can eject material at high speeds, possibly helping to drive the blowout and regulate star formation in their host galaxies. However, many aspects of this evolutionary scheme are not understood. Quasars that are partially obscured by dust, which reddens their light in a way that is similar to the sun viewed during sunsets on earth, might provide windows into galactic evolution during the brief transition stage when the starburst is winding down and the visibly luminous quasar is first being revealed in the galactic center. New research, led by Frederick Hamann, a professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University of California, Riverside, describes the discovery of a unique new population of extremely red quasars. The findings were recently published in the journal the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The work by Hamann, combined with previous research by Hamann and others, describes the discovery of the new population of extremely red quasars detected in the Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The main goal of this study was to determine the size of the extremely red quasars population and characterize its basic properties compared to the much larger population of quasars in in the BOSS-SDSS survey overall. The extremely red quasars were selected for study because of their extreme color, but the analysis by Hamann and his fellow researchers reveal a number of peculiar properties consistent with a unique and possibly young evolutionary stage. In particular, they have an exceptionally high incidence of powerful quasar-driven outflows that could be involved in galaxy-wide blowouts of gas and dust. Overall, the gaseous environments around the black holes appear to be more extended and more energetic than the environments of normal quasars, which might occur at specific times when young gas-rich host galaxies are dumping prodigious amounts of matter into the central black holes, creating an exotic extreme variety of quasars. More work is needed now to examine the extremely red quasars population further and understand its relationship to the general phenomenon of quasars and, perhaps, to a particularly violent young phase of quasar-galaxy evolution. The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society paper is called "Extremely Red Quasers in BOSS." The other authors are: Nadia L. Zakamska (Johns Hopkins University and Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey), Nicholas Ross (University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom), Isabelle Paris (INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste in Italy), Rachael M. Alexandroff (Johns Hopkins University), Carolin Villforth (University of Bath in the United Kingdom), Gordon T. Richards (Drexel University), Hanna Herbst (University of Florida, Gainesville), W. Niel Brandt and Donald P. Schneider (Pennsylvania State University), Ben Cook (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), Kelly D. Denney (The Ohio State University), and Jenny E. Greene and Michael A. Strauss (Princeton University).


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

The candidates have been chosen, you've filled in the circles and dropped the envelope in the mailbox or ballot box, and you are now one of the millions of Americans who have cast a vote for president. But from those millions of single votes, how do election officials determine who will be the next president of the United States of America? It turns out, there may be nearly as many ways to count votes as there are voting precincts — and there are 8,000 precincts, said Edward Foley, an election expert at the Moritz College of Law at The Ohio State University.  [Election Day 2016: A Guide to the When, Why, What and How] "It's important to stress just how much variation there is," Foley told Live Science. However, despite the many variations, one commonality is that the vote count is incredibly meticulous and has multiple layers of oversight, said Charles Stewart III, a political science professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project. The process of counting votes is a Herculean effort that may involve about 1 million people across the country, Stewart said. About 126 million Americans voted in the 2012 election, according to estimates by the Bipartisan Policy Center. Based on that voter turnout, counting the vote requires one person involved in the vote count for every 100 to 150 voters. People are also voting in myriad ways. The 100,000 polling places feed into 8,000 precincts, but many states increasingly allow mail-in and absentee ballots that are sent directly to the local election office or county courthouse, while still others allow people to drop their mail-in ballot at polling places. In most places, the voting process looks a little like this: People go to their designated polling place, their name is checked off the voter rolls and they vote, either with a paper ballot that is optically scanned by a machine, an electronic voting machine or, very rarely, a paper ballot that is hand-read, Foley said. [Clinton or Trump for President: What Happens If the Election Is a Tie?] In the case of optically scanned ballots, once voting for the day is done, a poll worker pushes a little button on a computer that automatically tabulates the votes. Then, the machine will print out a grocery-receipt-like record with the vote tally, which is usually taped to the door of the polling place, Stewart said. Several copies of this printout are generated, and those copies, along with a computer card that stores the results, are bundled together and immediately sent to one of the central counting offices, which may be either a dedicated elections department or the county courthouse, Stewart said. (Some counties take uncounted ballots directly from the polling place to have them read by an optical scanner in the county courthouse, Stewart added.) Once these memory cards from all of the polling places are received by the central office, "they're popped into a computer much like you would pop a USB thumb drive into a computer," Stewart said. This computer then tallies all of the results and begins to generate a preliminary vote-count report, Stewart said. Then, this preliminary vote count can be conveyed in a number of ways. In some places, a "stringer" for the Associated Press (AP) will sit there and call in the results to the central AP call center, Stewart said. In other places, the results will be pushed via phone or internet to state officials, who will report the results. To prevent an election from being "hacked," some states even have their own separate, secure wires for transmitting election results between the county and the state, Foley said. Throughout this process, there are multiple safeguards to ensure the vote remains secure. "The laws require representatives from the various parties and then the county election board to be present" during vote tallies, Stewart said. In some places, the computer that is tabulating the vote at the county level will be placed in a locked room with a big picture window, so that observers can see — but not tamper with — the results, Stewart said. Mail-in and absentee ballots are typically sent directly to the central county courthouse or elections department, where they are collected. In the best-case scenarios, the mail-in ballot will be in two envelopes: an inner, plain envelope; and an outer one with a signature line, Stewart said. At the elections department, officials will open the outer envelopes and ensure that the signature matches with the one on file, and then place the sealed, plain envelopes in a pile to be counted by an optical-scan reader, which is used for the entire county, Stewart said. (Astronauts, meanwhile, have a whole separate procedure for casting their ballots from space.)   The results coming from the state- or county-level precincts on election night are not the official results, Foley said. That count begins well after the polls have closed, typically the following day, he said. [How Does the Electoral College Work?] "There's a certification process, called canvassing, of the returns, to double-check and triple-check their accuracy," Foley said. For instance, in the official vote tally, counters will make sure that the number of ballots given out is equal to or greater than the number of votes tallied, Stewart said. "It really is accounting. I liken it to double-entry bookkeeping — the sum across the rows has to equal the sum across the columns," Stewart said. Once all of the vote numbers have been reconciled, the county board certifies the election and generates a report with the official vote count. Numerous safeguards prevent fraud and voter suppression throughout the voting process. For instance, poll workers are sometimes overseen by election officials, to make sure they are not depriving anyone of a fair vote or allowing people who are not on the rolls to cast their ballots, Stewart said. The voting lists are public record, and members of each campaign are invited to observe the voters being checked off the lists to ensure a fair process, he said. "At a minimum, there's a right of the candidates and anyone with a question of the ballot to observe at every point," Stewart said. Observers are also on guard to prevent voter intimidation. For instance, the Department of Justice sends attorneys from its Civil Rights Division to observe 28 precincts and ensure they are complying with the Voting Rights Act of 1965, according to a DOJ statement. In addition, the claims of election rigging have spurred the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe to deploy hundreds of international monitors to observe the election. Because many international observers are not allowed into polling places, these monitors may go to election offices, observe the vote counts and ensure the process is free from tampering, Stewart said. Although most elements of the voting process are tightly regulated and monitored, there have been occasional cases of people voting multiple times or trying to stuff the ballot box (literally), but these cases are almost always not serious enough to trigger a new vote, Stewart said. However, the weakest link in the security of voting is the mail-in or absentee ballots, he said. "There isn't evidence of a widespread problem, but inevitably, when there are stories of voter fraud, they show up in mail balloting and, in particular, in absentee balloting," Stewart said. "It is rare for there to be a chain of custody of mail ballots." For instance, once a ballot is mailed to a person, it's out of that tightly controlled environment, Stewart said. "The ballot gets sent to you," Stewart said. "Do you actually get it? Once you get it, do you or a family member fill it out?" We Fact-Checked the Science Behind the Republican Party Platform The 5 Strangest Presidential Elections in US History


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Mountain Measurement, Inc. has established the NCLEX® Program Reports Panel of Nursing Experts. This group of nursing education leaders will provide their expertise to the makers of the NCLEX® Program Reports and the nursing education community at large. Portland, OR, December 21, 2016 --( “We are excited to collaborate with some of the finest leaders in nursing program evaluation.” - Brian Bontempo, PhD, Principal Consultant, Mountain Measurement. “We anticipate that this collaboration will improve the quality of training provided to NCLEX® Program Reports subscribers, which will help nursing program administrators and faculty across the US and Canada to improve their program’s curriculum and instruction.” The short-term goals of the NCLEX® Program Reports Panel of Experts include developing new NCLEX® Program Reports Professional Development Seminars and publishing journal articles about how to use the NCLEX® Program Reports. Long-term goals include modifying the content, format and style of the information provided in the NCLEX® Program Reports. “These goals speak to the heart of program evaluation standards, fundamental concepts of evaluation quality, and the critical importance and meaningful use of what is learned from program evaluation.” - Karen J. Saewert, PhD, RN, CPHQ, CNE, ANEF, Member, Panel of Experts. Panel members include: Roseann Colosimo, PhD, MSN, RN from the University of Nevada Las Vegas. Education: Saint John’s College (BS), Catholic University of America (MS), and The Ohio State University (PhD) Cathy Dearman, PhD, RN from the University of West Florida. Education: Mississippi University for Women (BS), University of Alabama at Birmingham (MS), University of Mississippi (PhD) Judith M. Pelletier, MSN, RN, CNE from the Upper Cape Cod Regional Technical School. Education: University of Lowell (BSN) and Salem State University (MSN) Karen J. Saewert, PhD, RN, CPHQ, CNE, ANEF from Arizona State University. Education: Arizona State University (BSN and MS) and University of Arizona (PhD) About the NCLEX® Program Reports The NCLEX® Program Reports are downloadable PDF files that describe the performance of a nursing program’s graduates on the NCLEX® Examination. Subscribing nursing education programs use the Reports to track program growth, reform curriculum or modify instructional methodology. The Reports are produced by Mountain Measurement, Inc. on behalf of Pearson VUE and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. About Mountain Measurement, Inc. Mountain Measurement is a leader in psychometrics, analytics, data visualization and reporting. Mountain Measurement primarily serves the K–12 and licensure and certification sectors of the testing industry. Media contact: Brian Bontempo, Ph.D. Mountain Measurement, Inc. +1 503 284-1288 Portland, OR, December 21, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Mountain Measurement, Inc. has established the NCLEX® Program Reports Panel of Nursing Experts. This group of nursing education leaders will provide their expertise to the makers of the NCLEX® Program Reports and the nursing education community at large.“We are excited to collaborate with some of the finest leaders in nursing program evaluation.” - Brian Bontempo, PhD, Principal Consultant, Mountain Measurement. “We anticipate that this collaboration will improve the quality of training provided to NCLEX® Program Reports subscribers, which will help nursing program administrators and faculty across the US and Canada to improve their program’s curriculum and instruction.”The short-term goals of the NCLEX® Program Reports Panel of Experts include developing new NCLEX® Program Reports Professional Development Seminars and publishing journal articles about how to use the NCLEX® Program Reports. Long-term goals include modifying the content, format and style of the information provided in the NCLEX® Program Reports. “These goals speak to the heart of program evaluation standards, fundamental concepts of evaluation quality, and the critical importance and meaningful use of what is learned from program evaluation.” - Karen J. Saewert, PhD, RN, CPHQ, CNE, ANEF, Member, Panel of Experts.Panel members include:Roseann Colosimo, PhD, MSN, RN from the University of Nevada Las Vegas. Education: Saint John’s College (BS), Catholic University of America (MS), and The Ohio State University (PhD)Cathy Dearman, PhD, RN from the University of West Florida. Education: Mississippi University for Women (BS), University of Alabama at Birmingham (MS), University of Mississippi (PhD)Judith M. Pelletier, MSN, RN, CNE from the Upper Cape Cod Regional Technical School. Education: University of Lowell (BSN) and Salem State University (MSN)Karen J. Saewert, PhD, RN, CPHQ, CNE, ANEF from Arizona State University. Education: Arizona State University (BSN and MS) and University of Arizona (PhD)About the NCLEX® Program ReportsThe NCLEX® Program Reports are downloadable PDF files that describe the performance of a nursing program’s graduates on the NCLEX® Examination. Subscribing nursing education programs use the Reports to track program growth, reform curriculum or modify instructional methodology. The Reports are produced by Mountain Measurement, Inc. on behalf of Pearson VUE and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.About Mountain Measurement, Inc.Mountain Measurement is a leader in psychometrics, analytics, data visualization and reporting. Mountain Measurement primarily serves the K–12 and licensure and certification sectors of the testing industry.Media contact:Brian Bontempo, Ph.D. Mountain Measurement, Inc. +1 503 284-1288 Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Mountain Measurement


Other factors -- such as weight loss, a healthy diet and ceasing to smoke -- remain the top risk-reduction strategies both for developing cancer and premature cancer-related deaths COLUMBUS, Ohio - Regular use of over-the-counter non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen is associated with an increased risk of dying in patients diagnosed with Type 1 endometrial cancers, according to a new population-based study led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). In this observational study, a multi-institutional team of cancer researchers sought to understand the association of regular NSAID use and the risk of dying from endometrial cancer among a cohort of more than 4,000 patients. They found that regular NSAID use was associated with a 66 percent increased risk of dying from endometrial cancer among women with Type 1 endometrial cancers, a typically less-aggressive form of the disease. The association was statistically significant among patients who reported past or current NSAID use at the time of diagnosis, but it was strongest among patients who had used NSAIDs for more than 10 years in the past but had ceased use prior to diagnosis. Use of NSAIDs was not associated with mortality from typically more aggressive, Type 2 cancers. "There is a increasing evidence that chronic inflammation is involved in endometrial cancer and progression and recent data suggests that inhibition of inflammation through NSAID use plays a role," says Theodore Brasky, PhD, co-lead author of the study and a cancer epidemiologist with the OSUCCC - James. "This study identifies a clear association that merits additional research to help us fully understand the biologic mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Our finding was surprising because it goes against previous studies that suggest NSAIDs can be used to reduce inflammation and reduce the risk of developing or dying from certain cancers, like colorectal cancer." Researchers point out that information about specific dosages and NSAID use after surgery was not available in the current study, which represents a significant limitation. "We are continuing to analyze the biologic mechanisms by which inflammation is related to cancer progression in this specific cohort of patients," adds Ashley Felix, PhD, co-lead author of the study and cancer epidemiologist with the OSUCCC - James and College of Public Health. They report their findings in the Dec. 16, 2016, issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "These results are intriguing and worthy of further investigation," says David Cohn, MD, gynecologic oncology division director at the OSUCCC - James and co-author of the study. "It is important to remember that endometrial cancer patients are far more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than their cancer so women who take NSAIDs to reduce their risk of heart attack -- under the guidance of their physicians -- should continue doing so. While these data are interesting, there is not yet enough data to make a public recommendation for or against taking NSAIDS to reduce the risk of cancer-related death." Cohn says any woman concerned about the risks of long-term NSAID use should consult with her physician. For this study, researchers analyzed information from 4,374 endometrial cancer patients who previously participated in a national clinical trial (NRG Oncology/GOG 210). All of the women were eligible for surgery and had not undergone prior surgery or radiation at the time of enrollment. Participants were followed for an average of five years after enrollment. Study participants were asked at the beginning of the study to complete a questionnaire prior to surgery to capture information about previous and current NSAID use including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs (ibuprofren, naproxen, indomethacin, piroxicam, sulinadac) and COX-2 inhibitors. Researchers collected information about duration of use -- ranging from less than one year to more than 10 years -- and whether that use was previous or current. Daily frequency of NSAID use, NSAID dosage, and use after surgery were not available. Researchers also collected clinical data (cancer stage, pathology, and treatment), demographic data (age, race, annual income, education) and information about established endometrial cancer risk factors, including body weight/height, reproductive and menstrual characteristics, history of hormone therapy, smoking status and other medical conditions. Researchers used regression models to statistically account for the influence of these additional factors on the association between NSAID use and endometrial cancer mortality. Funding for this research comes from grants to the NRG/Gynecologic Oncology Group (CA 27469, CA 37517, 1 U10 CA180822 and U10 CA180868); National Cancer Institute and National Institutes of Health. Additional collaborators in this study include Louise A. Brinton, PhD, of the National Cancer Institute; D. Scott McMeekin, MD, and Joan Walker, MD, of the University of Oklahoma; David Mutch, MD, and Premal Thaker, MD, Washington University School of Medicine; William Creasman, MD, Medical University of South Carolina; Richard Moore, MD, Women and Infants Hospital/Brown University; Shashikant Lele, MD, and John Boggess, MD, University of North Carolina; Saketh Guntupalli, MD, University of Colorado Cancer Center; Levi Downs, MD, University of Minnesota; Christa Nagel, MD, Case Western Reserve University; Michael Pearl, MD, State University of New York; Olga Ioffe, MD; University of Maryland; and Shamshad Ali, Roswell Park Cancer Institute. More than 60,000 women are diagnosed with endometrial cancer in the United States annually, making it the fourth most common cancer in women and sixth leading cause of cancer death. The cancer begins in the lining of the uterus and grows outward to surrounding organs. Type 1 tumors are less aggressive and are typically confined to the uterus at the time of diagnosis, whereas Type 2 tumors tend to be aggressive and are at greater risk of spreading. The disease is most common in women over age 60. Aside from aging, excess body weight, diabetes, certain hormone therapies, a family history of endometrial cancer or personal history of endometrial hyperplasia, breast cancer or ovarian cancer are associated with increased risk of the disease. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only four centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs. As the cancer program's 306-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, please visit cancer.osu.edu.


News Article | August 22, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

New research links specific inherited genetic differences (alterations) to an increased risk for eye (uveal) melanoma, a rare form of melanoma that arises from pigment cells that determine eye color. Roughly 2,500 people are diagnosed with uveal melanoma in the United States annually. Previous clinical data suggests uveal melanoma is more common in Caucasians and individuals with light eye coloration; however, the genetic mechanisms underlying this cancer's development were largely unknown. In this new study -- co-authored by ophthalmologic pathologist and cancer geneticist Mohamed Abdel-Rahman, M.D., Ph.D., of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute and cancer geneticist Tomas Kirchhoff, Ph.D., of the Perlmutter Cancer Center of NYU School of Medicine - scientists report the first evidence of a strong association between genes linked to eye color and development of uveal melanoma. Reported data suggests that inherited genetic factors associated with eye and skin pigmentation could increase a person's risk for uveal melanoma. Abdel-Rahman, Kirchhoff and team report their findings in the medical journal Scientific Reports. "This is a very important discovery that will guide future research efforts to explore the interactions of these pigmentary genes with other genetic and environmental risk factors in cancers not linked to sun exposure, such as eye melanoma. This could provide a paradigm shift in the field. Our study suggests that in eye melanoma the pigmentation difference may play a direct cancer-driving role, not related to sunlight protection," says Abdel-Rahman. Unlike other solid tumors, there has been limited progress in understanding the contribution of genetic risk factors to the development of uveal melanoma, researchers say, primarily due to the absence of comprehensive genetic data from patients as the large sample cohorts for this rare cancer type have not been available for research. To overcome these limitations, researchers analyzed samples from more than 270 patients with uveal melanoma, most of whom were treated at Ohio State. Because there is a known clinical connection between eye melanoma and skin cancer, in this study researchers sought to determine whether there were commonly shared genetic factors between both diseases, as the inherited genetic risk of skin melanoma has been more extensively explored in previous medical literature. The team analyzed 29 inherited genetic mutations previously linked with skin melanoma to determine if there was an associated risk of uveal melanoma. This analysis revealed that five genetic mutations were significantly associated with uveal melanoma risk. The three most significant genetic associations occurred in a genetic region that determines eye color. "Genetic susceptibility to uveal melanoma has been traditionally thought to be restricted only to a small groups of patients with family history. Now our strong data shows the presence of novel genetic risk factors associated with this disease in a general population of uveal melanoma patients," says Kirchhoff. "But this data is also important because it indicates -- for the first time -- that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to both skin and uveal melanoma mediated by genetic determination of eye color. This knowledge may have direct implications in the deeper molecular understanding of both diseases," adds Kirchhoff. Researchers expect the data presented in this study to fuel the formation of large national and international research consortiums to conduct comprehensive, systematic analysis of inherited (germline) genome data in large cohorts of uveal melanoma patients. "This type of collaboration is critically needed to dissect additional modifying genetic risk factors that may be uveal melanoma specific. This has important consequences not only for the prevention or early diagnosis of the disease but potentially for more improved therapies for at-risk patients," says Kirchhoff. "Federal funding will be crucial to support research of rare cancers such as eye melanoma as it is likely, as shown in this study, that the impact of such research will extend across the different cancer types," adds Abdel-Rahman.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Mike Gardner, President and CEO of third-party logistics provider Kane Is Able, Inc. (KANE -- http://www.kaneisable.com) was awarded the 2016 “Fearless Fundraiser” award by Pelotonia, an organization that runs fundraising bike tours to fight cancer. Pelotonia announced the award at the Pelotonia 2016 Check Celebration on Wednesday, November 9th at Express Live, an indoor-outdoor concert venue in downtown Columbus, OH. Mike’s efforts raised close to $70,000 in funds for cancer research this past year. Susie Pattison, Director of Rider Recruitment and Stewardship for Pelotonia, stated, “Mike set a high bar for all of our other participants! We are so grateful for his enthusiasm for this year’s campaign.” Pelotonia directs 100 percent of every dollar raised by participants to cancer research at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital, and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. Upon receiving the award, Mike said, “A few years ago, my dad was diagnosed with colon cancer. Through surgery, excellent medical care, prayers, and the support of family and friends, he continues to be in remission. Pelotonia is an amazing experience that combines physical challenge, philanthropy and community involvement. These are central tenets in my own life. I am proud to support one of the premier cancer centers in the country – one mile, and one dollar, at a time. Additionally, I’d like to thank the Kane family and our great KANE associates across the country, who have given generously to this cause.” Founded in 2008, Pelotonia was established with the objective to fund life‐saving cancer research. Pelotonia’s ride weekend is a three‐day experience that includes a weekend of cycling, entertainment and volunteerism. In its first seven rides, Pelotonia has raised more than $100 million for cancer research. About Kane Is Able Kane Is Able is a third-party logistics provider that helps manufacturers and their retail partners efficiently and effectively distribute goods throughout the United States. KANE’s value-added logistics services include retail consolidation, nationwide warehousing and distribution, contract packaging, fulfillment, and transportation solutions.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: spaceref.com

Galaxies formed and grew billions of years ago by accumulating gas from their surroundings, or colliding and merging with other young galaxies. These early stages of galaxy assembly are believed to be accompanied by episodes of rapid star formation, known as starbursts, and rapid growth of a single super-massive black hole in the galactic centers. A popular paradigm for this evolution has the black holes growing mostly in obscurity, buried deep within the dusty gas. These are rich star-forming galaxies until a blowout of gas and dust (outflow) extinguishes the star formation and halts further growth in the black holes. The outflow then reveals a luminous, rapidly growing black hole in the galactic nucleus. These are known as quasars. Quasars can eject material at high speeds, possibly helping to drive the blowout and regulate star formation in their host galaxies. However, many aspects of this evolutionary scheme are not understood. Quasars that are partially obscured by dust, which reddens their light in a way that is similar to the sun viewed during sunsets on earth, might provide windows into galactic evolution during the brief transition stage when the starburst is winding down and the visibly luminous quasar is first being revealed in the galactic center. New research, led by Frederick Hamann, a professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University of California, Riverside, describes the discovery of a unique new population of extremely red quasars. The findings were recently published in the journal the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The work by Hamann, combined with previous research by Hamann and others, describes the discovery of the new population of extremely red quasars detected in the Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The main goal of this study was to determine the size of the extremely red quasars population and characterize its basic properties compared to the much larger population of quasars in in the BOSS-SDSS survey overall. The extremely red quasars were selected for study because of their extreme color, but the analysis by Hamann and his fellow researchers reveal a number of peculiar properties consistent with a unique and possibly young evolutionary stage. In particular, they have an exceptionally high incidence of powerful quasar-driven outflows that could be involved in galaxy-wide blowouts of gas and dust. Overall, the gaseous environments around the black holes appear to be more extended and more energetic than the environments of normal quasars, which might occur at specific times when young gas-rich host galaxies are dumping prodigious amounts of matter into the central black holes, creating an exotic extreme variety of quasars. More work is needed now to examine the extremely red quasars population further and understand its relationship to the general phenomenon of quasars and, perhaps, to a particularly violent young phase of quasar-galaxy evolution. The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society paper is called "Extremely Red Quasers in BOSS." The other authors are: Nadia L. Zakamska (Johns Hopkins University and Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey), Nicholas Ross (University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom), Isabelle Paris (INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste in Italy), Rachael M. Alexandroff (Johns Hopkins University), Carolin Villforth (University of Bath in the United Kingdom), Gordon T. Richards (Drexel University), Hanna Herbst (University of Florida, Gainesville), W. Niel Brandt and Donald P. Schneider (Pennsylvania State University), Ben Cook (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), Kelly D. Denney (The Ohio State University), and Jenny E. Greene and Michael A. Strauss (Princeton University). Please follow SpaceRef on Twitter and Like us on Facebook.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) has identified a mechanism by which cancer cells develop resistance to a class of drugs called fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors. Published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, the study also found that use of a second inhibitor might improve the effectiveness of these drugs by possibly preventing resistance, and it recommends that clinical trials should be designed to include a second inhibitor. FGFR inhibitors are a new family of targeted agents designed to inhibit the action of the fibroblast growth factor receptor, which is often overexpressed in lung, bladder, biliary and breast cancers. "Understanding how drug resistance develops can help in the design of new agents or strategies to overcome resistance," says principal investigator Sameek Roychowdhury, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine and of pharmacology in the Division of Medical Oncology at the OSUCCC - James. "Our paper demonstrates in a laboratory model how cancer can evade this class of therapy, and it provides insights into how clinical trials for these therapies could be further developed to overcome the problem of drug resistance," he adds. The laboratory study by Roychowdhury and his colleagues induced resistance to the FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 in lung- and bladder-cancer cells after long-term exposure to the agent. The researchers then found that, while the drug continued to inhibit FGFR activity in the resistant cells, its inhibition of FGFR signaling had no appreciable effect on the cells' survival. Examining other molecules in the FGFR pathway, the researchers found that a regulatory protein called Akt remained highly active, even during FGFR inhibition. Akt, a key regulator of cell biology, is directly involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and cell growth. Furthermore, they found that by inhibiting Akt they could significantly slow cell proliferation, cell migration and cell invasion in the lung cancer and bladder cancer cells. "Fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors are new therapies being developed in clinical trials for patients whose cancer cells have genetic alterations in this family of genes," says Roychowdhury, a member of the OSUCCC - James Translational Therapeutics Program. "We believe our findings will help improve this therapy for lung, bladder and other cancers."


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Ohio State seeking volunteers who currently use cigarettes, smokeless tobacco or e-cigarettes for 2 clinical studies aimed at understanding the health effects of e-cigarettes and other tobacco products COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Most Americans under age 35 think that using electronic cigarettes does not cause as much damage lung health as compared with traditional cigarettes, according to the results of a new national consumer survey. The survey - which included more than 2,000 people under the age of 35 - showed that 44 percent of survey respondents reported believing that e-cigarettes are less harmful to the lungs than traditional cigarettes. Among men specifically, that number jumped to 54 percent who think e-cigarettes are safer. "The truth is there is just so much we don't know about these new products," said Peter Shields, MD, a thoracic oncologist, cancer control researcher and deputy director of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. "We have no idea where in the spectrum these are, in terms of safety. Are they like cigarettes, or nothing like cigarettes? Do they affect people the same if they've never smoked, or a lot worse? We need to figure this out." Ongoing Clinical Studies Evaluate Health Impact The OSUCCC - James is recruiting healthy volunteers who currently use tobacco products for two clinical studies underway to evaluate the health effects of electronic cigarettes (known as "e-cigs" or "vaping") and other tobacco products. "There is minimal data available regarding the direct health effects of e-cig use or vaping, but these products have gained rapid popularity among existing smokers and non-smokers alike, including young adults," says Shields. "We are concerned that people assume these products have fewer negative health effects as compared with cigarettes and other tobacco products. The reality is that they are still a tobacco product and people are still inhaling potentially harmful chemicals. They should not be considered a 'safer' option until science has the opportunity to catch up with the consumer market." On May 5, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finalized a rule extending its regulatory authority to all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, hookah tobacco and pipe tobacco. Prior to this, there was no federal law prohibiting retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookah tobacco or cigars to people under age 18. The final FDA went into effect Aug. 8, 2016. The OSUCCC - James research is being done to provide the FDA with scientific data to guide consumer regulation of tobacco products. The research is funded by the FDA and the National Cancer Institute. The OSUCCC - James is recruiting about 60 current cigarette smokers, e-cig users, smokeless tobacco users, and non-smokers for this pilot study aimed at understanding whether e-cig use impacts lung health differently than traditional cigarettes. In order to directly assess the impact of tobacco and e-cig use on the lungs, volunteers undergo bronchoscopy. This is an outpatient test where a doctor inserts a thin tube through the nose or mouth to view the airways. A small sample of lung cells will be collected from fluid in the lungs of healthy smokers, e-cig users, smokeless tobacco users and non-smokers to evaluate differences among the groups. Participants will also be asked to complete questionnaires regarding demographic information, medical history and previous/current tobacco use. "This will allow us to see - in real time - how the lung tissue of non-smokers, e-cig users and traditional cigarette smokers differs. We are especially interested in understanding how e-cig use impacts immunology factors. This could be an important indicator of negative health impacts and give us clues about the changes in lung tissue that lead to future lung diseases," adds Shields. Non-smoker volunteers will be asked to use nicotine- and flavor-free e-cigs for one month and then undergo another bronchoscopy so that they can document the effects, if any, of e-cigs on the lungs. All information gathered through the study will be used to evaluate health impact of e-cig use on the lung and help guide the FDA in developing future regulations to make e-cigs safer. Participants do not have to reside in Columbus, Ohio, to participate in the study but they do need to be able to travel to The OSUCCC - James a minimum of two times. Participants will be compensated for their time and receive e-cigs for free. To learn more, visit cancer.osu.edu/ecigs, email ecig-study@osumc.edu or call 1-844-744-2447. The OSUCCC - James is seeking several hundred current smokers who are otherwise in good health for a study to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes and other tobacco products on exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and other smoke toxins. In addition, researchers will collect information about how flavorings influence a person's choice to use the products. The study is being conducted in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Roswell Park Cancer Institute, and is expected to enroll about 600 patients nationwide over five years. The study has two phases: a baseline phase and an eight-week clinical trial. During the baseline phase, participants will be asked to complete questionnaires and provide urine and mouth cell samples. They will then be will be randomly assigned to one of the clinical trial study groups: e-cig (delivers vaporized nicotine) or medicinal nicotine (gum or lozenges) for 8 weeks. All participants will receive free products (e-cigs or nicotine replacement therapy) and financial compensation for participation. "This study is aimed at identifying how different methods of using tobacco impacts the exposures that happen when smoking the product or using e-cigs, but it will also give us important information about how personal thoughts and attitudes toward tobacco products influence how, when and why people use tobacco at all," explains Shields. Participants do not have to reside in Columbus, Ohio, to participate in this study but they must be able to come to The OSUCCC - James weekly for a period of three months and have access to a telephone. To learn more about this study, visit cancer.osu.edu/ecigs, email comet-study@osumc.edu or call 1-844-744-2447. Both e-cig studies are funded by the National Institutes of Health and FDA as part of the Ohio State University's Tobacco Center of Regulatory Sciences, a federally funded research program that spans the entire university. The center focuses on research aimed at putting science behind the FDA's regulation of tobacco products. Additional support for the bronchoscopy study comes from Pelotonia, a grassroots cycling event that has raised more than $106 million for cancer research efforts at The OSUCCC - James. Pelotonia 2017 takes place Aug. 4-6, 2017. Learn more at pelotonia.org. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 46 National Cancer Institute designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only four centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs. As the cancer program's 306-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, visit cancer.osu.edu.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Athletes who regularly engage in overhead arm and shoulder throwing motions are all-too-familiar with the threat of a SLAP tear. SLAP, an acronym for “superior labrum, anterior to posterior”, refers to a torn labrum, the rubbery tissue ring surrounding the shoulder socket. A SLAP injury can run the gamut from mild to severe, with surgical interventions and rehabilitation required in many cases. One type of SLAP post-surgery rehab modality making headlines for its excellence is aquatic therapy. For Ryan Bitzel, MPT, San Diego Padres’ Rehabilitation Coordinator, SLAP tears among his athletes are always a possibility. To help his population of baseball players recover faster and with less chance of undue stress on their shoulders, he and his team use a variety of rehab techniques and tools, including an advanced hydrotherapy pool. Bitzel will share his experiences assisting athletes during a two-hour, CEU eligible (for athletic trainers) HydroWorx hosted webinar on October 26, 2016, from 1:00-3:00 p.m. E.D.T. Bitzel’s webinar is focused around a specific case study, However, the two-hour multi-faceted informational session will include comprehensive discussions of the anatomy of the shoulder, why SLAP injuries occur in overhead throwing athletes, clinical signs associated with labral tears and other injuries, and the stages of aquatic therapy post-op rehab for SLAP injury recovery. Additionally, Bitzel will share specific exercises that successfully advance the goals of SLAP surgical patients, as well as discuss the unique water properties that make hydrotherapy beneficial to shoulder rehab patients. “The Rehabilitation of a Professional Baseball Player Post-Op SLAP Repair Incorporating the Use of Aquatic Therapy” is free to attend, but pre-registration is necessary to join the two-hour webinar. Athletic trainers can receive two (2) continuing education units (CEUs) through the BOC if they watch the live webinar in its entirety. Interested participants are encouraged to sign up as soon as possible at http://ww2.hydroworx.com/webinar-labral-repair-10-2016 to reserve a place. At the end of the webinar, Bitzel will hold a Q&A session to address attendees’ discussion points. About Ryan Bitzel Now in his 6th season as the San Diego Padres’ Rehabilitation Coordinator, Ryan Bitzel earned his master’s degree in physical therapy from Walsh University, North Canton, Ohio. He specializes in the rehab of athletes recovering from elbow UCL reconstructions and shoulder surgeries. Bitzel regularly utilizes aquatic therapy for rehab, cross-training and conditioning. About HydroWorx Since the late 1990s, HydroWorx has manufactured aquatic therapy products with built-in underwater treadmills to enable rehabilitation professionals to more effectively offer their patients and athletes the opportunity to increase range of motion, decrease risk of falls and joint stress, remain motivated through the rehab process and speed the return to play for athletes and every day normal activities. Products such as the HydroWorx 2000 and 500 Series therapy pools, along with the new construction-free HydroWorx 300 system have revolutionized the face of aquatic therapy; in fact, HydroWorx technology is used by world-class facilities like the renowned Kennedy Krieger Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Frazier Rehab Institute and The Andrews Institute, as well as many elite athletic programs including the University of Oregon, Kansas City Royals, Washington Redskins, The Ohio State University, Manchester United and Chelsea Football Clubs and hundreds more. HydroWorx offers a wide range of underwater treadmill pools and peripheral products and services. Every day, more than 29,000 athletes and patients use HydroWorx technology to recover from injuries and health conditions. More information about HydroWorx can be found at http://www.HydroWorx.com


Company’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel provides fast and affordable diagnostic tool in fight against antibiotic resistance SALT LAKE CITY, Nov. 17, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Basin Scientific, Inc. (OTCQB:GBSN), a molecular diagnostics company, today announced findings from its 2016 Antimicrobial Stewardship Survey, which explored the issue of antibiotic resistance and the need for appropriate antibiotic use among healthcare organizations. The results, based on a survey of 1,090 hospitals and labs, found that 73 percent of respondents have instituted antimicrobial stewardship programs, which support organizational efforts toward proper antimicrobial use to reduce microbial resistance. Great Basin conducted the survey as part of its participation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Get Smart About Antibiotics Week, taking place November 14-18, 2016. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, or superbugs, has created significant challenges for the healthcare industry. Per the CDC, two million people in the U.S. suffer infections due to superbugs each year, with 23,000 dying as a result. A contributing factor to the rise of superbugs is the decades-old practice of overprescribing broad spectrum drugs, which has led to evolving strains of bacteria no longer affected by commonly used antibiotics. The CDC has found that one-in-three antibiotic prescriptions – 47 million prescriptions per year – are unnecessary. Great Basin’s survey findings reflect the healthcare industry’s efforts to combat this issue through antimicrobial stewardship programs. Eighty-one percent of respondents to Great Basin’s survey said the benefits of their program have been noticeable, with four out of five respondents expecting cost savings and 90 percent anticipating improvements in patient care. “For healthcare organizations all over the country, it’s become increasingly clear that supporting antimicrobial stewardship efforts isn’t only beneficial in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria, but has a positive impact in terms of improved patient care and lower costs,” said Ryan Ashton, co-founder and chief executive officer of Great Basin. “A vital tool in the fight against antibiotic resistance is fast and easy diagnostic testing. Great Basin’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel enables clinicians to test for infection-causing bacteria and delivers accurate detection in less than two hours with minimal hands-on steps, facilitating appropriate therapeutic decisions in an actionable timeframe. This can curb the overuse of antibiotics and lower costs for hospitals by reducing length of patient stay and expediting the discharge of patients who don’t need inpatient care.” “Antibiotic resistant infections are nothing short of a grave health crisis. Physicians and scientists around the globe are fighting daily to preserve the progress in infectious disease treatment developed in decades prior and healthcare facilities are responding by implementing antibiotic stewardship programs at a quicker pace,” said Debbie Goff, PharmD, FCCP, infectious disease specialist at The Ohio State University Medical Center. “Our ability to effectively raise awareness around the need for more responsible use of antibiotics is an important first step, but to drive real progress we must come together as a healthcare community to implement change in the research and development of drugs, the rapid detection of disease and to deliver high quality and effective patient care.” “Integrating a diagnostic tool, such as Staph ID/R, serves the mutual benefit of all parties across the care cycle – from hospitals to patients, and positions Great Basin as proactive partner in antimicrobial stewardship programs,” added Ashton. “To this end, we are proud to join with the CDC in drawing attention to a serious healthcare issue and actively working toward minimizing its future impact through innovation in diagnostics.” Click here for more information on antimicrobial stewardship programs, including survey results and an infographic on Great Basin’s role in fighting antibiotic resistant bacteria. Great Basin Scientific is a molecular diagnostics company that commercializes breakthrough chip-based technologies.  The Company is dedicated to the development of simple, yet powerful, sample-to-result technology and products that provide fast, multiple-pathogen diagnoses of infectious diseases. The Company’s vision is to make molecular diagnostic testing so simple and cost-effective that every patient will be tested for every serious infection, reducing misdiagnoses and significantly limiting the spread of infectious disease. More information can be found on the company’s website at www.gbscience.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements regarding the Company’s continuing business efforts related to its products, the Company continuing to act as proactive partner in antimicrobial stewardship programs, use of the Company’s Staph ID/R panel to curb overuse of antibiotics and other similar statements. Forward-looking statements involve risk and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially, and reported results should not be considered as an indication of future performance. These risk and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: (i) our limited operating history and history of losses; (ii) our ability to develop and commercialize new products and the timing of commercialization; (iii) our ability to obtain capital when needed; and (iv) other risks set forth in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the risks set forth in the company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015 and Quarterly Report on From 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof and Great Basin Scientific specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Columbus, Ohio - A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) has identified a mechanism by which cancer cells develop resistance to a class of drugs called fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors. Published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, the study also found that use of a second inhibitor might improve the effectiveness of these drugs by possibly preventing resistance, and it recommends that clinical trials should be designed to include a second inhibitor. FGFR inhibitors are a new family of targeted agents designed to inhibit the action of the fibroblast growth factor receptor, which is often overexpressed in lung, bladder, biliary and breast cancers. "Understanding how drug resistance develops can help in the design of new agents or strategies to overcome resistance," says principal investigator Sameek Roychowdhury, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine and of pharmacology in the Division of Medical Oncology at the OSUCCC - James. "Our paper demonstrates in a laboratory model how cancer can evade this class of therapy, and it provides insights into how clinical trials for these therapies could be further developed to overcome the problem of drug resistance," he adds. The laboratory study by Roychowdhury and his colleagues induced resistance to the FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 in lung- and bladder-cancer cells after long-term exposure to the agent. The researchers then found that, while the drug continued to inhibit FGFR activity in the resistant cells, its inhibition of FGFR signaling had no appreciable effect on the cells' survival. Examining other molecules in the FGFR pathway, the researchers found that a regulatory protein called Akt remained highly active, even during FGFR inhibition. Akt, a key regulator of cell biology, is directly involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and cell growth. Furthermore, they found that by inhibiting Akt they could significantly slow cell proliferation, cell migration and cell invasion in the lung cancer and bladder cancer cells. "Fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors are new therapies being developed in clinical trials for patients whose cancer cells have genetic alterations in this family of genes," says Roychowdhury, a member of the OSUCCC - James Translational Therapeutics Program. "We believe our findings will help improve this therapy for lung, bladder and other cancers." This work was supported by funding from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Cancer Society, the Prostate Cancer Foundation, Fore Cancer Research, American Lung Association and Pelotonia. Other Ohio State researchers involved in this study were Jharna Datta, Senthilkumar Damodaran, Hannah Parks, Cristina Ocrainiciuc, Jharna Miya, Lianbo Yu, Elijah P. Gardner, Eric Samorodnitsky, Michele R. Wing, Darshna Bhatt, John Hays and Julie W. Reeser. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 47 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only a few centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs sponsored by the NCI. As the cancer program's 308-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors and with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, please visit cancer.osu.edu.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

CLEVELAND--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Ulmer & Berne LLP is pleased to announce that it has named Howard Groedel chair of its Business Law Practice Group. The firm also appointed partners Douglas K. Sesnowitz and Marie C. Kuban as the group’s vice chairs. Separately, Ulmer named partner Lori Pittman Haas as vice chair of its Real Estate Practice Group, which is chaired by Mary Forbes Lovett. Groedel focuses his practice on securities law, corporate transactions and financial services regulation. He counsels broker-dealers, investment advisers, banks, trust companies, private equity funds and other financial institutions with respect to regulatory and governance matters. He also counsels public and privately held companies in the issuance of debt and equity securities, acquisitions and divestitures, Exchange Act reporting requirements, and general corporate transactional and governance matters. A frequent author and speaker on securities law and regulatory subjects, Groedel regularly represents companies and individuals in connection with government and regulatory investigations involving securities and financial regulatory law matters. He earned his B.A. from Miami University (Ohio) and his J.D. from George Washington University Law School. Sesnowitz counsels public and private companies in a wide range of industries on a variety of corporate matters and has served as general counsel and advisor to many closely held and middle market companies in the manufacturing, distribution, retail, and service industries. Sesnowitz also has significant experience structuring and negotiating mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures. He earned his B.A. from Washington University (St. Louis) and his J.D. from The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. Kuban represents public and private companies and private equity firms in structuring and negotiating corporate acquisitions, divestitures, mergers and joint ventures, and advises on general corporate matters. She also has extensive experience in representing financial institutions and private lenders, as well as borrowers, on asset-based, cash flow, acquisition and other commercial financing transactions, including agented and syndicated loan transactions. She earned her B.A. from Ohio Wesleyan University and her J.D. from the Western New England College School of Law. Haas represents buyers and sellers in the acquisition, disposition, and development of commercial property, including convenience stores with fuel facilities, retail centers, office buildings, and mixed use developments. She advises shopping center developers and commercial property owners in the financing of development projects utilizing Historic Tax Credit, New Markets Tax Credits, construction financing, and conventional financing. She also represents landlords and tenants of commercial real estate (retail, office, and warehouse). Haas earned her B.S.B.A. from Youngstown State University and her J.D. from the University of Akron School of Law. “Our Business Law and Real Estate Practice Groups form most of the core of the ‘non-litigation’ side of our firm, so ensuring that we have leaders in place who understand our overall firm vision and how it relates to their respective practices is critical to Ulmer’s long-term success,” said Scott Kadish, Ulmer’s Managing Partner. “Howard, Doug, Marie and Lori share common traits with our other practice group leaders throughout the firm. They are all obviously exceptional attorneys, and beyond that, they are strong leaders with a keen understanding of the business of running a successful practice group within the context of the large multi-state law firm. We are proud and excited to welcome them to these leadership roles.” Ulmer’s Business Law Practice Group helps clients achieve their full potential by combining legal experience with business acumen and creativity. By focusing on its clients’ needs and investing the time to understand their businesses, the group delivers exceptional client service and value. The group represents a wide variety of domestic and foreign businesses, including public companies, private equity groups, venture funds and their portfolio companies, financial institutions, middle market companies, family offices, entrepreneurs, and emerging growth companies in national and international commercial business and cross-border transactions. It also serves as outside general counsel to many of its clients and acts as special counsel to others, either in specialized areas or on a transactional basis. From the acquisition and financing of a corporate headquarters to the construction of a publicly funded sports facility, Ulmer’s Real Estate Practice Group offers a broad scope of talent and expertise in serving clients across the U.S. The group serves as national leasing counsel to specialty retailers with more than 1,000 stores and locations in almost every state in the U.S., and is regularly engaged by the world’s largest restaurant company for acquisitions and dispositions of locations around the country. The group’s clients also include leading apartment owners and developers, shopping center owners, general contractors, property managers, lenders, investors, municipalities, and school districts. At Ulmer, the focus is on exceeding client expectations and delivering superior, customized legal solutions for an exceptional value. From offices in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Chicago, and Boca Raton, the firm's attorneys serve as counselors and partners to a wide range of sophisticated clients to help them solve their complex challenges and achieve their goals. For more information, please visit ulmer.com.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

This rapidly fatal brain cancer has seen only two improvements in therapy in 30 years BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - In a paper published today in Cancer Research, researchers: 1) identify a biomarker enzyme associated with aggressive glioma brain tumors, 2) reveal the regulatory mechanism for that enzyme, and 3) demonstrate potent efficacy, using a mouse model of glioma, for a small molecule inhibitor they have developed. The inhibitor, GA11, retains a core structure that resembles natural inhibitors of the biomarker enzyme; but the inhibitor has been modified to help it pass through the blood-brain barrier. "In principle, both these features make GA11 an attractive drug candidate to target glioma stem-like cells in glioblastoma multiforme tumors," said Ichiro Nakano, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in the paper. Nakano, a professor of neurosurgery and academic neurosurgeon at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Vito Coviello and Concettina La Motta, University of Pisa, Italy, are doing further preclinical evaluation of the GA11 and its analogs. Glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM, is a formidable cancer foe. Only two therapeutic improvements have appeared in the past 30 years, increasing the average survival of patients from five months to 15 or 16 months, Nakano says. A GBM tumor is a mix of different cells that respond differently to therapies. Small numbers of glioma stem-like cells, or GSCs, drive the tumorigenicity of GBM and thus are prime targets for possible treatments. One GSC subtype called the mesenchymal GSC is more malignant and the most therapy-resistant, so Nakano and fellow researchers reasoned that identifying the regulatory molecules active in mesenchymal GSCs might lead to novel and effective therapeutics. Nakano and colleagues found that one form of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase -- ALDH1A3 -- is a specific marker for mesenchymal GSCs, and his group is the first to show that, among the heterogeneous mix of cells in a GBM tumor, cells with high levels of ALDH1A3 expression were more tumorigenic in vivo than are cells that are low in ALDH1A3. The researchers also found that the FOXD1 transcription factor regulates the production of ALDH1A3 in mesenchymal GSCs. In clinical samples of high-grade gliomas from patients, the expression levels of both FOXD1 and ALDH1A3 were inversely correlated with disease progression -- gliomas with high levels were more rapidly fatal than were gliomas with low levels. Astonishingly, the same mechanism that drives the mesenchymal GSC tumorigenicity in humans acts in an evolutionarily distant organism, the fruit fly. Knocking down the expression of either the fruit fly version of the FOXD1 gene or the fruit fly version of ALDH1A3 blocks the formation of brain tumors in a brain cancer model of the fruit fly species Drosophila melanogaster, the researchers found. Thus, this signaling has been highly conserved in evolution. The FOXD1 transcription factor is normally active during development from a fertilized egg and embryo to a fetus, and it is silent after birth. The role of FOXD1 in GBM, Nakano and colleagues say, suggests that the mesenchymal GSCs have hijacked the molecular mechanism of normal embryonic development to promote tumor growth. In preclinical testing, GA11 was validated several ways. The researchers showed that it inhibited ALDH in yeast, reduced ALDH1 activity in cell-culture spheres of mesenchymal GSCs, inhibited proliferation of glioma spheres in cell culture, and inhibited xenograft growth of GBM in mouse brains. "In conclusion," Nakano and fellow researchers wrote, "the FOXD1-ALDH1A3 axis is critical for tumor initiation in mesenchymal GSCs, therefore providing possible new molecular targets for the treatment of GBM and other ALDH1-activated cancers." Nakano says his study of the role of GSCs in GBM is just one approach to treat glioma tumors. Other labs are pursuing immunotherapy, the use of check-point inhibitors, vaccination and efforts to increase sensitivity to radiotherapy. It will take combined therapies to treat glioblastoma, Nakano says. "We don't believe that one therapy will be effective." Nakano expects to launch a new clinical trial for glioblastoma in 2017, in conjunction with Burt Nabors, M.D., professor of neurology at UAB. Nakano says UAB will be the only site in the Deep South for this unique trial aimed at a molecular target in glioma stem cells, a target that is different from the ones described in the Cancer Research paper. The referral contact to Nakano's service will be Lydia P. Harrell. The Nakano lab is also working on brain metastases, tumors that spread into the brain from other parts of the body. Similar to high-grade gliomas, which originate in the brain, these metastatic brain tumors are lethal, and there are very few therapeutic options. Nakano believes the core stem cell genes and signaling pathways are shared between gliomas and brain metastases. "If so," he said, "the molecular targets identified for gliomas are most likely essential in brain metastases. Studies are underway, and similar to the glioma therapy development, I am working to develop clinical trials for brain metastasis, together with medical oncologists Mansoor Saleh, M.D., Andres Forero, M.D., and others at UAB." Besides Nakano, Coviello and La Motta, authors of the Cancer Research paper, "FOXD1-ALDH1A3 signaling is a determinant for the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of mesenchymal glioma stem cells," are Peng Cheng, Jia Wang, Zhuo Zhang, Sung-Hak Kim, Marat S. Pavlyukov and Mutsuko Minata, UAB Department of Neurosurgery and Comprehensive Cancer Center; Indrayani Waghmare and Madhuri Kango-Singh, Department of Biology, University of Dayton, Ohio; Stefania Sartini, Department of Pharmacy, University of Pisa, Italy; Ahmed Mohyeldin, Department of Neurological Surgery and the James Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University; Claudia L.L. Valentim, Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic; Rishi Raj Chhipa and Biplab Dasgupta, Department of Oncology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; and Krishna P.L. Bhat, Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston.


Company’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel provides fast and affordable diagnostic tool in fight against antibiotic resistance SALT LAKE CITY, Nov. 17, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Basin Scientific, Inc. (OTCQB:GBSN), a molecular diagnostics company, today announced findings from its 2016 Antimicrobial Stewardship Survey, which explored the issue of antibiotic resistance and the need for appropriate antibiotic use among healthcare organizations. The results, based on a survey of 1,090 hospitals and labs, found that 73 percent of respondents have instituted antimicrobial stewardship programs, which support organizational efforts toward proper antimicrobial use to reduce microbial resistance. Great Basin conducted the survey as part of its participation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Get Smart About Antibiotics Week, taking place November 14-18, 2016. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, or superbugs, has created significant challenges for the healthcare industry. Per the CDC, two million people in the U.S. suffer infections due to superbugs each year, with 23,000 dying as a result. A contributing factor to the rise of superbugs is the decades-old practice of overprescribing broad spectrum drugs, which has led to evolving strains of bacteria no longer affected by commonly used antibiotics. The CDC has found that one-in-three antibiotic prescriptions – 47 million prescriptions per year – are unnecessary. Great Basin’s survey findings reflect the healthcare industry’s efforts to combat this issue through antimicrobial stewardship programs. Eighty-one percent of respondents to Great Basin’s survey said the benefits of their program have been noticeable, with four out of five respondents expecting cost savings and 90 percent anticipating improvements in patient care. “For healthcare organizations all over the country, it’s become increasingly clear that supporting antimicrobial stewardship efforts isn’t only beneficial in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria, but has a positive impact in terms of improved patient care and lower costs,” said Ryan Ashton, co-founder and chief executive officer of Great Basin. “A vital tool in the fight against antibiotic resistance is fast and easy diagnostic testing. Great Basin’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel enables clinicians to test for infection-causing bacteria and delivers accurate detection in less than two hours with minimal hands-on steps, facilitating appropriate therapeutic decisions in an actionable timeframe. This can curb the overuse of antibiotics and lower costs for hospitals by reducing length of patient stay and expediting the discharge of patients who don’t need inpatient care.” “Antibiotic resistant infections are nothing short of a grave health crisis. Physicians and scientists around the globe are fighting daily to preserve the progress in infectious disease treatment developed in decades prior and healthcare facilities are responding by implementing antibiotic stewardship programs at a quicker pace,” said Debbie Goff, PharmD, FCCP, infectious disease specialist at The Ohio State University Medical Center. “Our ability to effectively raise awareness around the need for more responsible use of antibiotics is an important first step, but to drive real progress we must come together as a healthcare community to implement change in the research and development of drugs, the rapid detection of disease and to deliver high quality and effective patient care.” “Integrating a diagnostic tool, such as Staph ID/R, serves the mutual benefit of all parties across the care cycle – from hospitals to patients, and positions Great Basin as proactive partner in antimicrobial stewardship programs,” added Ashton. “To this end, we are proud to join with the CDC in drawing attention to a serious healthcare issue and actively working toward minimizing its future impact through innovation in diagnostics.” Click here for more information on antimicrobial stewardship programs, including survey results and an infographic on Great Basin’s role in fighting antibiotic resistant bacteria. Great Basin Scientific is a molecular diagnostics company that commercializes breakthrough chip-based technologies.  The Company is dedicated to the development of simple, yet powerful, sample-to-result technology and products that provide fast, multiple-pathogen diagnoses of infectious diseases. The Company’s vision is to make molecular diagnostic testing so simple and cost-effective that every patient will be tested for every serious infection, reducing misdiagnoses and significantly limiting the spread of infectious disease. More information can be found on the company’s website at www.gbscience.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements regarding the Company’s continuing business efforts related to its products, the Company continuing to act as proactive partner in antimicrobial stewardship programs, use of the Company’s Staph ID/R panel to curb overuse of antibiotics and other similar statements. Forward-looking statements involve risk and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially, and reported results should not be considered as an indication of future performance. These risk and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: (i) our limited operating history and history of losses; (ii) our ability to develop and commercialize new products and the timing of commercialization; (iii) our ability to obtain capital when needed; and (iv) other risks set forth in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the risks set forth in the company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015 and Quarterly Report on From 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof and Great Basin Scientific specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Most Americans under age 35 think that using electronic cigarettes does not cause as much damage lung health as compared with traditional cigarettes, according to the results of a new national consumer survey. The survey -- which included more than 2,000 people under the age of 35 -- showed that 44 percent of survey respondents reported believing that e-cigarettes are less harmful to the lungs than traditional cigarettes. Among men specifically, that number jumped to 54 percent who think e-cigarettes are safer. "The truth is there is just so much we don't know about these new products," said Peter Shields, MD, a thoracic oncologist, cancer control researcher and deputy director of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. "We have no idea where in the spectrum these are, in terms of safety. Are they like cigarettes, or nothing like cigarettes? Do they affect people the same if they've never smoked, or a lot worse? We need to figure this out." The OSUCCC -- James is recruiting healthy volunteers who currently use tobacco products for two clinical studies underway to evaluate the health effects of electronic cigarettes (known as "e-cigs" or "vaping") and other tobacco products. "There is minimal data available regarding the direct health effects of e-cig use or vaping, but these products have gained rapid popularity among existing smokers and non-smokers alike, including young adults," says Shields. "We are concerned that people assume these products have fewer negative health effects as compared with cigarettes and other tobacco products. The reality is that they are still a tobacco product and people are still inhaling potentially harmful chemicals. They should not be considered a 'safer' option until science has the opportunity to catch up with the consumer market." On May 5, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finalized a rule extending its regulatory authority to all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, hookah tobacco and pipe tobacco. Prior to this, there was no federal law prohibiting retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookah tobacco or cigars to people under age 18. The final FDA went into effect Aug. 8, 2016. The OSUCCC -- James research is being done to provide the FDA with scientific data to guide consumer regulation of tobacco products. The research is funded by the FDA and the National Cancer Institute.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SOUTHFIELD, Mich.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Consulting, engineering and construction services firm Atwell, LLC is pleased to announce Gregg Stephens, PG, has joined the firm as Project Manager, Environmental. He will be based in Atlanta, Georgia. Stephens will manage projects and teams performing assessments and remediation of hazardous waste sites, and chemical/petroleum releases and evaluations of groundwater resources. Stephens has over 25 years of experience in field operations which include subsurface drilling, sampling, aquifer characterization and geophysical investigations. Prior to joining Atwell, Stephens was a Principal Geologist in charge of developing the Southeast United States for a global professional services firm. In addition to project management, his responsibilities included oversight of the Environmental Department, staff and administrative personnel utilization. Stephens is a decorated veteran of the United States Army, and a registered professional geologist is 5 states. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Geology from The Ohio State University. “We are excited to have Gregg join our team. He will be a great mentor and manager. His leadership skills and environmental experience make him a great asset to our team,” said Atwell Director, Environmental Services, Bobbi Westerby. Atwell, LLC is a national consulting, engineering and construction services firm with over five hundred professionals across the country that deliver a broad range of strategic and creative solutions to clients in a variety of industries including real estate and land development, power and energy, and oil and gas. They provide comprehensive turnkey services including land and ROW support, planning, landscape architecture, engineering, land surveying, environmental science, and project and construction management.


COLUMBUS, Ohio - A new study shows that psychosocial risk factors that impact a person's ability to cope with chronic stress are associated with significantly higher readmission rates and longer hospital stays among blood cancer patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). This, says, researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James), is a critical clinical concern and area of unmet need for patients who require intensive treatment to eradicate their cancer that should be addressed in a systematic way by the oncology community. "Stem cell transplant can be a curative treatment for certain cancers, but it is a very long process that can put strains on a patient before, during and after the actual transplant," said Ashley Rosko, MD, an OSUCCC - James hematologist and senior author of the new study. "Just like we assess potential impact and risks of a patient's co-morbidities before pursuing a stem cell transplant, we saw a need to evaluate psychosocial vulnerabilities to identify those patients at the highest risk for complications and develop interventions to ensure the smoothest recovery possible." The goal of this study was identify patients that might be at increased risk for complications during or after treatment based on non-traditional medical factors that influence overall health and wellbeing, such as depression and anxiety. Researchers conducted an observational study of 395 patients undergoing stem cell transplant to treat acute leukemia, multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other cancers/disorders at the OSUCCC - James in Columbus, Ohio. Stem cell transplantation involves collecting stem cells - which are produced in the bone marrow - either from the cancer patient (autologous) or a donor (allogeneic). Stem cells are then infused back into the patient after high dose chemotherapy cancer treatment is complete to help restore the bone marrow's ability to produce red and white blood cells that fight off infection. Prior to treatment, all patients in this study had a psychosocial screening to identify factors affecting their ability to cope including: history of anxiety, depression, substance abuse, health behaviors, family social support, emotional tone, and mental status. Patients deemed at-risk were subcategorized into mild and moderate risk. OSUCCC - James researchers found that 48 percent of all patients included in this observational study were deemed to be at risk. Psychiatric conditions (24 percent), poor health behaviors (16 percent) and poor coping history (13 percent) were the most common identified risk factors. In addition, all patients with any degree of psychosocial vulnerability - regardless of race, disease type, remission status or type of stem cell transplant procedure - were at a higher risk for hospital readmission following HSCT and at-risk autologous transplant patients have a significantly longer length of stay. The findings will be presented on Dec. 5, 2016, at the American Society of Hematology 2016. "Hospital readmission in stem cell transplant patients is associated with poor overall survival, increased cost and worse quality of life so it is important that we do all that we can to identify these patients in advance of treatment to help them successfully navigate the treatment process," says Rosko. "Many of these psychosocial risk factors can be mitigated and managed to the benefit of the patient." Researchers expect to continue this research through a prospective study aimed at identifying at-risk patients prior to therapy and offering a psychologist-led coping strategy intervention prior to treatment. "We need to help our patients better cope with the chronic stress of a cancer diagnosis and treatment so that they are less likely to have setbacks in care due to additional illness," adds Rosko. This research was supported as a clinical quality research initiative of The OSUCCC - James division of hematology. Co-authors of the study include first author Daniel Richardson, MD, Ying Huang, Patrick Elder, Joanna Newlin, Cyndi Kirkendall, Steven Devine, MD, Leslie Andritsos, MD, Don Benson, MD, PhD, William Blum, MD, Yvonne Efebera, MD, Craig Hofmeister, MD, Samantha Jaglowski, MD, Rebecca Klisovic, MD, Heather McGinty, PhD, Sam Penza, MD, Sumithra Vasu and Basem William, MD. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 45 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only four centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs. As the cancer program's 306-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, please visit cancer.osu.edu.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Dickinson Wright PLLC is pleased to announce that four of our attorneys in the Columbus office have been named to the 2017 Ohio Super Lawyers list. Sara H. Jodka – Ms. Jodka has been named a 2017 Ohio Super Lawyer for Employment Litigation: Defense. She was also named to the 2017 Top 25 Women Business Lawyers in Columbus Super Lawyers list. She devotes a significant part of her practice to proactively counsel employers in litigation prevention and overall compliance with state, federal, and administrative laws and regulations, which includes reviewing and revising employee handbooks and policies; counseling management regarding termination decisions; performing exempt-status classification audits; and training employees on key employment policies and issues. She routinely defends employers, in both state and federal court, arising under Title VII, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and comparable state laws. Ms. Jodka received her B.A. from The Ohio State University and her J.D. from Capital University Law School. Harlan W. Robins – Mr. Robins has been named a 2017 Ohio Super Lawyer for Real Estate Law. He is the Practice Department Manager for the firm’s Real Estate, Environmental, and Energy & Sustainability practices. He also serves as Co-Chair of Dickinson Wright’s Diversity Committee. He focuses his practice on real estate finance, development & land use, acquisitions & dispositions, and banking & financial services. He represents lenders in complex, multi-state workouts, deeds-in-lieu of foreclosure and foreclosure of real estate-secured loans, loan modifications and loan origination for permanent and construction financings. Mr. Robins received his B.A. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Emory University School of Law. Jonathan R. Secrest – Mr. Secrest has been named a 2017 Ohio Super Lawyer for General Litigation. His practice focuses on assisting clients with employment related matters, including representation through all stages of litigation and before state and federal agencies. He represents small and large employers on employment issues ranging from sexual harassment claims to alleged violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). He also represents food manufacturers in the defense of food product liability claims and provides counsel related to FDA regulatory issues. Mr. Secrest received his B.A. from DePauw University and his J.D. from Capital University Law School. J. Troy Terakedis – Mr. Terakedis has been named a 2017 Ohio Super Lawyer for Tax Law. He counsels clients on a variety of federal income tax matters, including tax issues related to partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. He also counsels leveraged buyout, venture capital, and other private equity funds on formation and equity compensation issues and other tax-related matters often as they relate to structuring mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, joint ventures, and reorganizations in a tax-efficient manner. He advises officers and directors of Fortune 500 companies, principals of private equity funds, owners of closely-held businesses and other high net worth individuals and executives on individual federal income tax matters. Mr. Terakedis received his B.A. from Kenyon College, his J.D./M.B.A. from Case Western Reserve University, and his LL.M. in Taxation from the University of Miami. Super Lawyers is a listing of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. About Dickinson Wright PLLC Dickinson Wright PLLC is a general practice business law firm with more than 425 attorneys among more than 40 practice areas and 16 industry groups. Headquartered in Detroit and founded in 1878, the firm has seventeen offices, including six in Michigan (Detroit, Troy, Ann Arbor, Lansing, Grand Rapids, and Saginaw) and ten other domestic offices in Austin, Texas; Columbus, Ohio; Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; Lexington, Ky.; Nashville and Music Row, Tenn.; Las Vegas and Reno, Nev.; Phoenix, Ariz.; and Washington, D.C. The firm’s Canada office is located in Toronto. Dickinson Wright offers our clients a distinctive combination of superb client service, exceptional quality, value for fees, industry expertise and business acumen. As one of the few law firms with ISO/IEC 27001:2013 certification, Dickinson Wright has built state-of-the-art, independently-verified risk management controls and security processes for our commercial transactions. Dickinson Wright lawyers are known for delivering commercially-oriented advice on sophisticated transactions and have a remarkable record of wins in high-stakes litigation. Dickinson Wright lawyers are regularly cited for their expertise and experience by Chambers, Best Lawyers, Super Lawyers, and other leading independent law firm evaluating organizations.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

An avalanche of ice that killed nine in western Tibet may be a sign that climate change has come to the region, a new study finds. The avalanche at the Aru glacier in July 2016 was a massive event that spilled ice and rock 98 feet (30 meters) thick over an area of 4 square miles (10 square kilometers). Nine nomadic herders and many of their animals died during the 5-minute cataclysm. It was the second-biggest glacial avalanche ever recorded, and initially mystified scientists. "This is new territory scientifically," Andreas Kääb, a glaciologist at the University of Oslo, said in a statement in September. "It is unknown why an entire glacier tongue would shear off like this." [Images of Melt: Earth's Vanishing Ice] Now, an international group of scientists thinks they know the reason: Meltwater at the base of the glacier must have hastened the slide of the debris. "Given the rate at which the event occurred and the area covered, I think it could only happen in the presence of meltwater," Lonnie Thompson, a professor of Earth sciences at The Ohio State University, said in a statement. Thompson and his colleagues from the university's Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center worked with scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences to measure the icefall and recreate it with a computer model. They based the model on satellite and global position system (GPS) data, allowing for a precise understanding of how much debris fell. The stimulations could only recreate the catastrophic collapse if meltwater was present. Liquid water at the base of a glacier speeds its advance by reducing friction, as is frequently seen in Greenland. Meltwater may also bring heat to the interior of the glacier, warming it from the inside, according to 2013 research on Greenland's glaciers. In western Tibet, the origin of the possible meltwater is unknown, Thompson said in the statement. However, the region is undoubtedly heating up. "[G]iven that the average temperature at the nearest weather station has risen by about 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) over the last 50 years, it makes sense that snow and ice are melting and the resulting water is seeping down beneath the glacier," Thompson said. That's particularly alarming because western Tibet's glaciers have so far been stable in the face of warming temperatures, according to the researchers. In southern and eastern Tibet, the glaciers have been melting much more rapidly. Above-average snowfall in western Tibet has even expanded some glaciers, according to study author Lide Tian, a glaciologist at the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Paradoxically, Tian said in a statement, that extra snowfall may have created more meltwater and made the devastating avalanche more likely. A second avalanche hit just a few kilometers away in September 2016. No one was harmed in that icefall, but Kääb and his colleagues said that the two collapses, so close in time and space, were unprecedented.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Providing high-quality patient care while reducing costs is a significant goal in the current health care reform environment. The Institute of Medicine has specifically called for the establishment of "learning health systems" to address this challenge. In a learning health system, the electronic health record is utilized to drive research and personalized treatments based on data from patients with similar conditions and risk factors. A recent pilot study by a team from Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University has demonstrated that with the implementation of a "local" learning health system, clinical quality can be improved while simultaneously reducing health care costs. The study was published in a recent issue of Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology with an editorial published today online in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Current efforts to establish learning health systems have been designed primarily around the integration of electronic health records among multiple hospital systems. While substantial progress has been made with this approach, the operational and technical barriers of bringing together such diverse hospital systems led the Nationwide Children's/Ohio State team to consider an alternative based on the concept of a "local" learning health system. Local systems start with the integration of research, clinical care and quality improvement within a specific health service and then use the knowledge gained to systematically deliver quality improvement and cost savings. Those clinical improvements can be expanded to other programs within the hospital or across the health care network. The team from Nationwide Children's and Ohio State developed and implemented a local learning health system model of care with optimization of the electronic health record and a robust care coordination system at its core. The project, named the "Learn From Every Patient" (LFEP) Program, was piloted with a group of 131 children treated through the Nationwide Children's Cerebral Palsy (CP) Program. Children treated in the LFEP Program during the 12-month study period experienced a 43 percent reduction in total inpatient days; a 27 percent reduction in inpatient admissions; a 30 percent reduction in emergency department visits; and a 29 percent reduction in urgent care visits. LFEP Program implementation resulted in reductions in health care costs of $1.36 million. "Introducing electronic health record-supported care that integrated clinical care, quality improvement and distinct, clinician-driven research resulted in large reductions in health care utilization, greatly reduced healthcare charges and improved care coordination," explains William E. Smoyer, MD, vice president, Clinical and Translational Research and director, Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Nationwide Children's Hospital, senior author on the study paper and lead author of the editorial. The cost of implementing the pilot program, including care coordination expenses, totaled approximately $225,000 over the first year. However, these costs were only 16 percent of the reduced total health care expenditures realized during the first year of the program, representing a savings of approximately $6 for each $1 invested. In addition, the clinicians working in the CP clinic reported that this approach simplified their documentation, enabling more patients to be seen during each session. Consistent with the goals of a learning health system, the data collected in the electronic health record included five clinician-inspired "learning projects" conducted during routine clinical care for the pilot LFEP group. One of these studies has been published in a peer-reviewed journal and one is in press. "The use of the LFEP Program in our clinic has resulted in robust research data that can be used for publication and for implementing evidence-based improvements in clinical care," says author Garey Noritz, MD, medical director of the Cerebral Palsy Program at Nationwide Children's Hospital and associate professor at The Ohio State University. "For example, children with cerebral palsy are prone to hip dislocation, so our practice had been to perform x-rays on every child every year. An examination of our data revealed that this was excessive for children with mild CP. We have since changed our protocol for these patients, reducing their exposure to radiation, as well as costs." "These results demonstrate that a learning health system can be developed and implemented in a cost-effective manner, and can integrate clinical care and research to systematically drive simultaneous clinical quality improvement and reduced health care costs," notes co-author Peter Embi, MD, MS, associate professor and interim chair of Biomedical Informatics and chief research information officer at The Ohio State University. As described in the journal article, the early experience of this local learning health system (i.e. a bottom-up approach) suggests that this method has the potential to be an effective complementary or alternative strategy to the top-down approach of learning health systems to achieve the overall goal of clinical transformation at the national level. The LFEP approach is being used as the foundation for the recently created Cerebral Palsy Research Network (cpresearch.net), which will connect multiple CP programs across the U.S. and Canada. "The adage that our local environment will affect our global health efforts has never been truer than now. With all of the externalities impacting health care, we need to be innovative, progressive and integrative relative to research and operations at every opportunity," notes senior author, Susan Moffatt-Bruce, MD, PhD, MBA, professor of Surgery and Biomedical Informatics and chief quality officer at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. "There are numerous future challenges related to demonstrating the potential value of using local learning health systems to develop a national adaptable learning health system," says Dr. Smoyer. "We still need to investigate whether local learning health systems can be successfully scaled across the wide variety of clinical programs that comprise the nation's health care systems. However, these preliminary findings from implementing this disruptive innovation at a single center demonstrate that learning health systems are indeed able to be implemented and that their feasibility and effectiveness can be tested."


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Washington, DC - Dec. 5, 2016 - Carbapenems are one of the most important classes of antibiotics used in humans, and are an important agent against multi-drug resistant bacteria. Now, for the first time, bacteria that carry a transmissible carbapenem resistance gene have been found in agricultural animals in the United States. The research is published in December 5th in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Carbapenem resistant bacteria are not uncommon in hospitals. However, in the US, carbapenems are not used in agriculture because of their importance to human health. "It's a surprise that they would show up in livestock," said corresponding author, Thomas Wittum, PhD, Professor and Chair of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, The Ohio State University. Like many antibiotic resistance genes, the carbapenem resistance gene in this report, called bla IMP-27, is carried by a plasmid. Plasmids are small pieces of independent DNA that can move easily from one bacterium to another, including across species. Additionally, the particular plasmid on which bla IMP-27 was found has one of the widest host ranges of any plasmid, said first author Dixie Mollenkopf, a graduate student in Wittum's lab. This combination of attributes, and the fact that carbapenem resistance was recently designated an urgent threat to public health by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention led the researchers to investigate whether bacteria with carbapenem resistance genes such as bla-imp-27 might be present in agricultural animals or in agricultural settings, said Wittum. The investigators used gauze swabs to obtain samples from floors and walls of pens, as well as swiffers, to collect environmental and fecal samples from a 1,500 sow, farrow-to-finish pig farm during four visits over five months. Despite all the work they had put into the study, they were still surprised to find carbapenem-resistant bacteria growing in the agar plates, said Mollenkopf. Nonetheless, the numbers of isolates bearing bla IMP-27 were few. Furthermore, the resistance gene was present primarily in environmental samples from the farrowing operation, and the investigators failed to find it in pigs being fattened for slaughter. "There is no evidence the pigs carried the gene into the [human] food supply," said Wittum. Still, finding the gene at all on this particular farm was somewhat mysterious because no new livestock were introduced on it during the past 50 years, said Wittum. The farm had bred all of its animals during this time. Carbapenems are a subset of β-lactam antibiotics. Β-lactam antibiotics which are not carbapenems are legal for use on farms in the US. This study's results support the investigators' hypothesis that the use of Ceftiofur, a β-lactam antibiotic, might be selecting for resistance to carbapenems on farms. The investigators suggest that in light of their results, monitoring farms will be important, to ensure that they do not become a source of bacteria with carbapenem resistance genes such as of bla IMP-27 within the human population. Additionally, "We may need to examine some of the practices of farms, and evaluate whether they are really appropriate, and whether the benefits outweigh the risks," said Wittum. Such practices include administering Ceftiofur, to all piglets in the farrowing barns rather than just those that happen to sicken, an FDA-approved application known as "disease control." The American Society for Microbiology is the largest single life science society, composed of over 48,000 scientists and health professionals. ASM's mission is to promote and advance the microbial sciences. ASM advances the microbial sciences through conferences, publications, certifications and educational opportunities. It enhances laboratory capacity around the globe through training and resources. It provides a network for scientists in academia, industry and clinical settings. Additionally, ASM promotes a deeper understanding of the microbial sciences to diverse audiences.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Brigid Heid has joined Eastman & Smith Ltd. in our Columbus office as part of the Labor and Employment Practice Group. “We are pleased to have Brigid join our Columbus office to support the needs the Firm’s clients and build on our continued expansion in the Central Ohio market,” commented Lane Williamson, Chair of the Firm’s Executive Committee. “Brigid has developed strong ties to the legal community, in particular with her current role as President of the Columbus Bar Association.” Brigid regularly advises her clients on matters involving business and employment disputes. Her practice focuses on helping businesses manage legal risks in the workplace, from protecting intellectual property and trade secrets from unauthorized disclosure or even theft, to developing best practices for handling employee discipline, properly classifying and paying workers, hiring and firing, leave management, insurance coverage and preventing harassment and discrimination. Ms. Heid earned both her law degree and her undergraduate degree (Chemistry) from The Ohio State University. Brigid is currently serving as the President of the Columbus Bar Association. She has been named one of the Top 25 Women Attorneys in Columbus, Ohio and a Super Lawyer® by Law & Politics Magazine and a Best Lawyer in Employment law by Best Lawyers®, and has been elected as a Fellow of the Litigation Counsel of America™. Brigid has also achieved the highest AV Preeminent® rating by Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Ratings. In addition to her involvement with the Columbus Bar Association, Ms. Heid is a member of many organizations including the Columbus Bar Foundation, the National Association of Women Business Owners, Executive Women’s Golf Association and Women Lawyers of Franklin County. About Eastman & Smith Client satisfaction. Reliability. Innovation. Creative approach to problem-solving. These are cornerstone attributes at Eastman & Smith. Its 75+ dedicated attorneys are based in four offices -- Columbus, Detroit, Findlay and Toledo -- and practice law in nearly 20 areas of practice including: business; construction; environmental; governmental and regulatory affairs; labor and employment; litigation and tax. Eastman & Smith values each client relationship by being committed to its clients, to understanding their businesses and needs. Best Lawyers®, Corporate Counsel, Fortune, Martindale-Hubbell and U.S. News and World Report all rank Eastman & Smith highly in their publications. Just as when it was founded in 1844, Eastman & Smith is committed to serving its clients to the best of its ability. For more information, visit the Firm's website, http://www.eastmansmith.com.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

This year, the Canada men’s national volleyball team left Rio de Janeiro as one of the competitors tied for 5th place in the indoor sport. What many viewers didn’t realize while watching the televised matches was that hydrotherapy played a part in bringing the tremendously talented athletes to the world stage. Gavin Schmitt, the team’s captain, was coming back from serious injuries. Like many long-time elite volleyball players, he had suffered stress fractures in his lower limbs due to constant running, twisting and jumping actions. Although one fracture had already been surgically addressed, another required tibial nailing. If he was going to lead his team to South America, he needed innovative, high-tech rehabilitation. Nick Held, M.H, CSCS, Director of Hydrotherapy at Fortius Sport & Health in Burnaby, British Columbia took on the role of creating a multidisciplinary approach to Schmitt’s full recovery. This approach included consistent use of hydrotherapy techniques and protocols to improve the volleyball captain’s strength and conditioning. As we know, Held’s program was successful and Schmitt was able to rise to the occasion, supporting his country on an international stage. Held will share the techniques he used during a HydroWorx-hosted webinar Thursday, December 15, 2016, from 1:00-2:00 p.m. E.S.T. The hour-long event, “Use of Hydrotherapy in Stress Fracture Recovery of Canada National Volleyball Team Captain,” will include an overview of the comprehensive treatment plan and timeline, as well as a thorough background of hydrotherapy options at Fortius Sport & Health. Interested participants can attend the webinar for free, but pre-registration is required to be a part of the live audience and be able to ask Held questions at the end of the event. The link to sign up for “Use of Hydrotherapy in Stress Fracture Recovery of Canada National Volleyball Team Captain” can be found at http://ww2.hydroworx.com/webinar-stress-fracture. Nick Held is not a newcomer to the aquatics industry. A frequent presenter at North American conferences and past nominee for the HydroWorx Excellence in Aquatics award, he has helped patients optimize their performance and rehab through the use of water immersion tools and techniques. In addition to his role as Director of Hydrotherapy at British Columbia-based Fortius Sport & Health, Held has worked with Field Hockey Canada, Hydrathletics and Wellspring UK. Since the late 1990s, HydroWorx has manufactured aquatic therapy products with built-in underwater treadmills to enable rehabilitation professionals to more effectively offer their patients and athletes the opportunity to increase range of motion, decrease risk of falls and joint stress, remain motivated through the rehab process and speed the return to play for athletes and every day normal activities. Products such as the HydroWorx 2000 and 500 Series therapy pools, along with the new construction-free HydroWorx 300 system have revolutionized the face of aquatic therapy; in fact, HydroWorx technology is used by world-class facilities like the renowned Kennedy Krieger Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Frazier Rehab Institute and The Andrews Institute, as well as many elite athletic programs including the University of Oregon, Kansas City Royals, Washington Redskins, The Ohio State University, Manchester United and Chelsea Football Clubs and hundreds more. HydroWorx offers a wide range of underwater treadmill pools and peripheral products and services. Every day, more than 30,000 athletes and patients use HydroWorx technology to recover from injuries and health conditions. More information about HydroWorx can be found at http://www.HydroWorx.com.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have discovered a tsunami of stars and gas that is crashing midway through the disk of a spiral galaxy known as IC 2163. This colossal wave of material - which was triggered when IC 2163 recently sideswiped another spiral galaxy dubbed NGC 2207 - produced dazzling arcs of intense star formation that resemble a pair of eyelids. "Although galaxy collisions of this type are not uncommon, only a few galaxies with eye-like, or ocular, structures are known to exist," said Michele Kaufman, an astronomer formerly with The Ohio State University in Columbus and lead author on a paper published today in the Astrophysical Journal. Kaufman and her colleagues note that the paucity of similar features in the observable universe is likely due to their ephemeral nature. "Galactic eyelids last only a few tens of millions of years, which is incredibly brief in the lifespan of a galaxy. Finding one in such a newly formed state gives us an exceptional opportunity to study what happens when one galaxy grazes another," said Kaufman. The interacting pair of galaxies resides approximately 114 million light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Canis Major. These galaxies brushed past each other - scraping the edges of their outer spiral arms - in what is likely the first encounter of an eventual merger. Using ALMA's remarkable sensitivity and resolution, the astronomers made the most detailed measurements ever of the motion of carbon monoxide gas in the galaxy's narrow eyelid features. Carbon monoxide is a tracer of molecular gas, which is the fuel for star formation. The data reveal that the gas in the outer portion of IC 2163's eyelids is racing inward at speeds in excess of 100 kilometers a second. This gas, however, quickly decelerates and its motion becomes more chaotic, eventually changing trajectory and aligning itself with the rotation of the galaxy rather than continuing its pell-mell rush toward the center. "What we observe in this galaxy is very much like a massive ocean wave barreling toward shore until it interacts with the shallows, causing it to lose momentum and dump all of its water and sand on the beach," said Bruce Elmegreen, a scientist with IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, and co-author on the paper. "Not only do we find a rapid deceleration of the gas as it moves from the outer to the inner edge of the eyelids, but we also measure that the more rapidly it decelerates, the denser the molecular gas becomes," said Kaufman. "This direct measurement of compression shows how the encounter between the two galaxies drives gas to pile up, spawn new star clusters and form these dazzling eyelid features." Computer models predict that such eyelid-like features could evolve if galaxies interacted in a very specific manner. "This evidence for a strong shock in the eyelids is terrific. It's all very well to have a theory and simulations suggesting it should be true, but real observational evidence is great," said Curtis Struck, a professor of astrophysics at Iowa State University in Ames and co-author on the paper. "ALMA showed us that the velocities of the molecular gas in the eyelids are on the right track with the predictions we get from computer models," said Kaufman. "This critical test of encounter simulations was not possible before." Astronomers believe that such collisions between galaxies were common in the early universe when galaxies were closer together. At that time, however, galactic disks were generally clumpy and irregular, so other processes likely overwhelmed the formation of similar eyelid features. The authors continue to study this galaxy pair and currently are comparing the properties (e.g., locations, ages, and masses) of the star clusters previously observed with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope with the properties of the molecular clouds observed with ALMA. They hope to better understand the differences between molecular clouds and star clusters in the eyelids and those elsewhere in the galaxy pair. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international astronomy facility, is a partnership of ESO, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) of Japan in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. ALMA is funded by ESO on behalf of its Member States, by NSF in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and the National Science Council of Taiwan (NSC) and by NINS in cooperation with the Academia Sinica (AS) in Taiwan and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI). ALMA construction and operations are led by ESO on behalf of its Member States; by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), managed by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), on behalf of North America; and by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) on behalf of East Asia. The Joint ALMA Observatory (JAO) provides the unified leadership and management of the construction, commissioning and operation of ALMA.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Two genetic mutations known to play a role in many solid cancers might also help explain why a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients develop the disease, according to new research from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). The mutations (which occur in the CCND1 and CCND2 genes) have been previously implicated in solid tumors but this new report represents some of the first data describing the role of these mutations in core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML), a form of cancer that affects blood-forming tissue (bone marrow). It is well-established that the two primary types of CBF-AML -- called t(8;21) and inv(16) -- are related on a molecular level and are both identified by the presence of a merged genetic mutation, or fusion gene. Researchers know, however, that the fusion gene alone is not capable of causing leukemia independently. "The hematology community has long sought to determine what other factors in addition to the fusion genes occur in this special type of leukemia. We are now the first to describe that mutations in CCND1, and among the first to describe that mutations in the sister gene CCND2 are unique features of CBF-AML with t(8;21)," says Ann-Kathrin Eisfeld, MD, first author of the study, Internal Medicine resident in the Physician-Scientist-Training program of OSU and researcher with the OSUCCC-James Leukemia Research Program in the laboratories of Clara D. Bloomfield, MD, and Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD. "In addition, we have collected the first evidence that mutations in CCND2 lead to more aggressive growth of leukemia cell lines. Based on those results, we can now test if they actually provide a transformative 'second hit' that propels the cells carrying the fusion gene to progress into cancer," adds Eisfeld. The OSUCCC - James team reports its findings online ahead of print Nov. 15, 2016, in the journal Leukemia. Additional insights were also presented at the American Society of Hematology meeting on Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. A previous comprehensive study of gene mutations in CBF-AML reported the presence of at least one genetic mutation in 85 percent of the patients studied, leaving the remaining 15 percent of patients to harbor other, as yet not discovered mutations. For this new study, Eisfeld and colleagues searched a large cohort of CBF-AML samples for the missing mutations that, together with the fusion genes, might contribute to the leukemia in this subgroup of cases. The team analyzed pretreatment bone marrow and peripheral blood samples from a 177 adult CBF-AML patients who received similar medical treatment through a national clinical trial conducted at multiple centers across the United States. Using a customized, targeted next-generation sequencing approach, the team looked for mutations in 84 leukemia- and/or cancer-associated protein-coding genes. Laboratory tests were also performed on blood or bone marrow cells to look for chromosomal irregularities. Researchers discovered two significant new mutations in the cyclin D1 (CCND1) and cyclin D2 (CCND2) genes, representing the first dual evidence of these recurrent genetic mutations in patients with t(8;21) AML. CCND1 and CCND2 mutations were found in 15 percent of patients with t(8;21), making it the third most common mutation among this subgroup of AML patients. "This is extremely valuable information that was previously unknown and it might help us develop targeted therapies more likely to help patients with this disease in the near future," adds Eisfeld. Researchers say this enhanced understanding of molecular alterations in CBF-AML could help explain the differences in clinical features between patients in the two subtypes of the disease, and especially also to patients with other types of leukemias. Co-authors of this study include Jessica Kohlschmidt, PhD, Deedra Nicolet, Sebastian Schwind, MD, James Blachly, MD, Shelley Orwick, Chandni Shah, Maryam Bainazar, Karl Kroll, Christopher Walker, PhD, Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD, Krzystof Mrozek, PhD, John Byrd, MD, Clara Bloomfield, MD, of OSUCCC - James; Andrew Carroll, MD, of the University of Alabama Birmingham; Bayard Powell, MD, of Wake Forest University Comprehensive Cancer Center; Richard Stone of Dana Farber; Jonathan Kolitz, MD, of Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine; Maria Baer, MD, of the University of Maryland. Funding was provided in part by the National Cancer Institute (grants CA101140, CA140158, CA180861, CA196171, CA016058, CA180821, CA180882, and CA077658), the Leukemia Clinical Research Foundation, the Warren D. Brown Foundation, the Pelotonia Fellowship Program (to Eisfeld), and by an allocation of computing resources from The Ohio Supercomputer Center. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 45 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only four centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs. As the cancer program's 306-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, please visit cancer.osu.edu.


News Article | December 11, 2015
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and the Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) have developed cancer-killing nanoparticles that swell and burst when exposed to near-infrared laser light. The researchers report this work in a paper in Advanced Materials. Such 'nanobombs' might overcome a biological barrier that has blocked development of agents that work by altering the activity of genes in cancer cells, either killing the cells outright or stalling their growth. Agents that change gene expression are generally forms of RNA (ribonucleic acid), and they are notoriously difficult to use as drugs, mainly because they are readily degraded when free in the bloodstream. One way to solve this problem is to package the RNA in nanoparticles that target tumor cells, but this leads to a second problem. When cancer cells take up ordinary nanoparticles, they often enclose them in small compartments called endosomes. This prevents the drug molecules from reaching their target, and they are soon degraded. So in addition to RNA, the new nanobombs contain ammonium bicarbonate, a leavening agent sometimes used in baking, which vaporizes when exposed to near-infrared laser light. This causes the nanobombs to swell to over three times their original size, bursting the endosomes and dispersing the RNA agent into the cell. "A major challenge to using nanoparticles to deliver gene-regulating agents such as microRNAs is the inability of the nanoparticles to escape the compartments, the endosomes, that they are encased in when cells take up the particles," explains principal investigator Xiaoming (Shawn) He, associate professor of biomedical engineering and member of the OSUCCC – James Translational Therapeutics Program. "We believe we've overcome this challenge by developing nanoparticles that include ammonium bicarbonate, a small molecule that vaporizes when exposing the nanoparticles to near-infrared laser light, causing the nanoparticle and endosome to burst, releasing the therapeutic RNA." To test the nanobombs, He and his colleagues tried them out on prostate tumors in an animal model. The nanoparticles were equipped to target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), which are cancer cells that have properties of stem cells. CSCs often resist therapy and are thought to play an important role in cancer development and recurrence. The therapeutic agent in the nanoparticles was a form of microRNA called miR-34a. The researchers chose this molecule because it can lower the levels of a protein that is crucial for CSC survival and may also be involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. They found that the nanobombs successfully delivered miR-34a to the tumors, significantly reducing their size. The advantage of using near-infrared laser light is that it can penetrate tissue to a depth of 1cm. For deeper tumors, the light would be delivered using minimally invasive surgery. This story is adapted from material from OSUCCC – James, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

For the first time, researchers have created light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on lightweight flexible metal foil. Engineers at The Ohio State University are developing the foil based LEDs for portable ultraviolet (UV) lights that soldiers and others can use to purify drinking water and sterilize medical equipment. In the journal Applied Physics Letters, the researchers describe how they designed the LEDs to shine in the high-energy “deep” end of the UV spectrum. The university will license the technology to industry for further development. Deep UV light is already used by the military, humanitarian organizations and industry for applications ranging from detection of biological agents to curing plastics, explains Roberto Myers, associate professor of materials science and engineering at Ohio State. The problem is that conventional deep-UV lamps are too heavy to easily carry around. “Right now, if you want to make deep ultraviolet light, you’ve got to use mercury lamps,” says Myers, who is also an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. “Mercury is toxic and the lamps are bulky and electrically inefficient. LEDs, on the other hand, are really efficient, so if we could make UV LEDs that are safe and portable and cheap, we could make safe drinking water wherever we need it.” He noted that other research groups have fabricated deep-UV LEDs at the laboratory scale, but only by using extremely pure, rigid single-crystal semiconductors as substrates — a strategy that imposes an enormous cost barrier for industry. Foil-based nanotechnology could enable large-scale production of a lighter, cheaper and more environmentally friendly deep-UV LED. But Myers and materials science doctoral student Brelon J. May hope that their technology will do something more: turn a niche research field known as nanophotonics into a viable industry. “People always said that nanophotonics will never be commercially important, because you can’t scale them up. Well, now we can. We can make a sheet of them if we want,” Myers says. “That means we can consider nanophotonics for large-scale manufacturing.” In part, this new development relies on a well-established semiconductor growth technique known as molecular beam epitaxy, in which vaporized elemental materials settle on a surface and self-organize into layers or nanostructures. The Ohio State researchers used this technique to grow a carpet of tightly packed aluminum gallium nitride wires on pieces of metal foil such as titanium and tantalum. The individual wires measure about 200 nanometers tall and about 20-50 nanometers in diameter — thousands of times narrower than a human hair and invisible to the naked eye. In laboratory tests, the nanowires grown on metal foils lit up nearly as brightly as those manufactured on the more expensive and less flexible single-crystal silicon. The researchers are working to make the nanowire LEDs even brighter, and will next try to grow the wires on foils made from more common metals, including steel and aluminum. This research was funded by the Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation. Study co-author A.T.M. Golam Sarwar earned his doctoral degree in the course of this work at Ohio State, and is now at Intel.


News Article | October 11, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Indiana University researchers have reported the first definitive evidence for a new molecular structure with potential applications to the safe storage of nuclear waste and reduction of chemicals that contaminate water and trigger large fish kills. The study, which was published online Oct. 6 in the German scientific journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, provides experimental proof for the existence of a chemical bond between two negatively charged molecules of bisulfate, or HSO4. The existence of this structure -- a "supramolecule" with two negatively charged ions -- was once regarded as impossible since it appears to defy a nearly 250-year-old chemical law that has recently come under new scrutiny. "An anion-anion dimerization of bisulfate goes against simple expectations of Coulomb's law," said IU professor Amar Flood, who is the senior author on the study. "But the structural evidence we present in this paper shows two hydroxy anions can in fact be chemically bonded. We believe the long-range repulsions between these anions are offset by short-range attractions." Flood is a professor in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Chemistry. The first author on the study is Elisabeth Fatila, a postdoctoral researcher in Flood’s lab. In molecular chemistry, two monomer molecules connected by a strong covalent bond are called a "dimer." (A polymer is a chain of many monomers.) In supramolecular chemistry, the dimers are connected by many weak non-covalent bonds. A negatively charged particle is an anion. A key part of Coulomb's law is the idea that two molecules with the same charge create a repellent force that prevents chemical bonding -- like two magnets with the same end put into close contact. But recently, experts have begun to argue that negatively charged molecules with hydrogen atoms, such as a bisulfate -- composed of hydrogen, sulfur and oxygen – can also form viable chemical bonds. "Although supramolecular chemistry started out as an effort to create new molecular hosts that hold on to complementary molecular guests through non-covalent bonds, the field has recently branched out to explore non-covalent interactions between the guests in order to create new 'chemical species,'"  Fatila said. The negatively charged bisulfate dimer in the IU study employs a self-complementary, anti-electrostatic hydrogen bond. The molecule's existence is made possible through encapsulation inside a pair of cyanostar macrocycles, a molecule previously developed by Flood’s lab at IU. Fatila and colleagues were trying to bind a single bisulfate molecule inside the cyanostar; the presence of two negatively charged bisulfate ions was a surprise. "This paper is inspirational because it may launch a new approach to supramolecular ion recognition," said Jonathan Sessler, a professor of chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin who was not involved in the study. "I expect this will be the start of something new and important in the field." The ability to produce a negatively charged bisulfate dimer might also advance the search for chemical solutions to several environmental challenges. Due to their ion-extraction properties, the molecules could potentially be used to remove sulfate ions from the process used to transform nuclear waste into storable solids -- a method called vitrification, which is harmed by these ions -- as well as to extract harmful phosphate ions from the environment. "The eutrophication of lakes is just one example of the serious threat to the environment caused by the runoff of phosphates from fertilizers," Flood said, referring to uncontrolled plant growth that results from excess phosphate nutrients running into lakes and ocean. When these chemicals get into the water supply as runoff from fertilizer -- produced by dairy farms and used to increase crop yields -- they can trigger massive algae blooms that poison water supplies and kill fish in large numbers. In August, Flood was also named the principal investigator on a new, separate grant from the National Science Foundationto specifically focus on removing these substances from the environment. The three-year, $600,000 award is a collaboration with Heather Allen, a professor at The Ohio State University, which is near a part of the country that has recently experienced large algae blooms due to agricultural runoff into Lake Erie. The new molecule in the study was detected using equipment at the IU Bloomington Department of Chemistry's Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility, the Laboratory for Biological Mass Spectrometry and the IU Molecular Structure Center. Study co-authors are professor Krishnan Raghavachari, associate scientist  Jonathan A. Karty, research associate Eric B. Twum, senior scientist Maren Pink and Ph.D. student Arkajyoti Sengupta, all of the IU Bloomington Department of Chemistry. Pink is also director of the IU Molecular Structure Center. Karty is the manager for the Mass Spectrometry lab. Twum is a spectroscopist in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility. This study was first reported at the 11th International Symposium on Macrocyclic and Supramolecular Chemistry in Seoul, South Korea. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation. The cynostar macrocycle developed by Flood's lab is the subject of a pending patent filed by the IU Research and Technology Corp.


Company’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel provides fast and affordable diagnostic tool in fight against antibiotic resistance SALT LAKE CITY, Nov. 17, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Basin Scientific, Inc. (OTCQB:GBSN), a molecular diagnostics company, today announced findings from its 2016 Antimicrobial Stewardship Survey, which explored the issue of antibiotic resistance and the need for appropriate antibiotic use among healthcare organizations. The results, based on a survey of 1,090 hospitals and labs, found that 73 percent of respondents have instituted antimicrobial stewardship programs, which support organizational efforts toward proper antimicrobial use to reduce microbial resistance. Great Basin conducted the survey as part of its participation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Get Smart About Antibiotics Week, taking place November 14-18, 2016. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, or superbugs, has created significant challenges for the healthcare industry. Per the CDC, two million people in the U.S. suffer infections due to superbugs each year, with 23,000 dying as a result. A contributing factor to the rise of superbugs is the decades-old practice of overprescribing broad spectrum drugs, which has led to evolving strains of bacteria no longer affected by commonly used antibiotics. The CDC has found that one-in-three antibiotic prescriptions – 47 million prescriptions per year – are unnecessary. Great Basin’s survey findings reflect the healthcare industry’s efforts to combat this issue through antimicrobial stewardship programs. Eighty-one percent of respondents to Great Basin’s survey said the benefits of their program have been noticeable, with four out of five respondents expecting cost savings and 90 percent anticipating improvements in patient care. “For healthcare organizations all over the country, it’s become increasingly clear that supporting antimicrobial stewardship efforts isn’t only beneficial in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria, but has a positive impact in terms of improved patient care and lower costs,” said Ryan Ashton, co-founder and chief executive officer of Great Basin. “A vital tool in the fight against antibiotic resistance is fast and easy diagnostic testing. Great Basin’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel enables clinicians to test for infection-causing bacteria and delivers accurate detection in less than two hours with minimal hands-on steps, facilitating appropriate therapeutic decisions in an actionable timeframe. This can curb the overuse of antibiotics and lower costs for hospitals by reducing length of patient stay and expediting the discharge of patients who don’t need inpatient care.” “Antibiotic resistant infections are nothing short of a grave health crisis. Physicians and scientists around the globe are fighting daily to preserve the progress in infectious disease treatment developed in decades prior and healthcare facilities are responding by implementing antibiotic stewardship programs at a quicker pace,” said Debbie Goff, PharmD, FCCP, infectious disease specialist at The Ohio State University Medical Center. “Our ability to effectively raise awareness around the need for more responsible use of antibiotics is an important first step, but to drive real progress we must come together as a healthcare community to implement change in the research and development of drugs, the rapid detection of disease and to deliver high quality and effective patient care.” “Integrating a diagnostic tool, such as Staph ID/R, serves the mutual benefit of all parties across the care cycle – from hospitals to patients, and positions Great Basin as proactive partner in antimicrobial stewardship programs,” added Ashton. “To this end, we are proud to join with the CDC in drawing attention to a serious healthcare issue and actively working toward minimizing its future impact through innovation in diagnostics.” Click here for more information on antimicrobial stewardship programs, including survey results and an infographic on Great Basin’s role in fighting antibiotic resistant bacteria. Great Basin Scientific is a molecular diagnostics company that commercializes breakthrough chip-based technologies.  The Company is dedicated to the development of simple, yet powerful, sample-to-result technology and products that provide fast, multiple-pathogen diagnoses of infectious diseases. The Company’s vision is to make molecular diagnostic testing so simple and cost-effective that every patient will be tested for every serious infection, reducing misdiagnoses and significantly limiting the spread of infectious disease. More information can be found on the company’s website at www.gbscience.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements regarding the Company’s continuing business efforts related to its products, the Company continuing to act as proactive partner in antimicrobial stewardship programs, use of the Company’s Staph ID/R panel to curb overuse of antibiotics and other similar statements. Forward-looking statements involve risk and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially, and reported results should not be considered as an indication of future performance. These risk and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: (i) our limited operating history and history of losses; (ii) our ability to develop and commercialize new products and the timing of commercialization; (iii) our ability to obtain capital when needed; and (iv) other risks set forth in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the risks set forth in the company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015 and Quarterly Report on From 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof and Great Basin Scientific specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio--For the first time, researchers have created light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on lightweight flexible metal foil. Engineers at The Ohio State University are developing the foil based LEDs for portable ultraviolet (UV) lights that soldiers and others can use to purify drinking water and sterilize medical equipment. In the journal Applied Physics Letters, the researchers describe how they designed the LEDs to shine in the high-energy "deep" end of the UV spectrum. The university will license the technology to industry for further development. Deep UV light is already used by the military, humanitarian organizations and industry for applications ranging from detection of biological agents to curing plastics, explained Roberto Myers, associate professor of materials science and engineering at Ohio State. The problem is that conventional deep-UV lamps are too heavy to easily carry around. "Right now, if you want to make deep ultraviolet light, you've got to use mercury lamps," said Myers, who is also an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. "Mercury is toxic and the lamps are bulky and electrically inefficient. LEDs, on the other hand, are really efficient, so if we could make UV LEDs that are safe and portable and cheap, we could make safe drinking water wherever we need it." He noted that other research groups have fabricated deep-UV LEDs at the laboratory scale, but only by using extremely pure, rigid single-crystal semiconductors as substrates--a strategy that imposes an enormous cost barrier for industry. Foil-based nanotechnology could enable large-scale production of a lighter, cheaper and more environmentally friendly deep-UV LED. But Myers and materials science doctoral student Brelon J. May hope that their technology will do something more: turn a niche research field known as nanophotonics into a viable industry. "People always said that nanophotonics will never be commercially important, because you can't scale them up. Well, now we can. We can make a sheet of them if we want," Myers said. "That means we can consider nanophotonics for large-scale manufacturing." In part, this new development relies on a well-established semiconductor growth technique known as molecular beam epitaxy, in which vaporized elemental materials settle on a surface and self-organize into layers or nanostructures. The Ohio State researchers used this technique to grow a carpet of tightly packed aluminum gallium nitride wires on pieces of metal foil such as titanium and tantalum. The individual wires measure about 200 nanometers tall and about 20-50 nanometers in diameter--thousands of times narrower than a human hair and invisible to the naked eye. In laboratory tests, the nanowires grown on metal foils lit up nearly as brightly as those manufactured on the more expensive and less flexible single-crystal silicon. The researchers are working to make the nanowire LEDs even brighter, and will next try to grow the wires on foils made from more common metals, including steel and aluminum. This research was funded by the Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation. Study co-author A.T.M. Golam Sarwar earned his doctoral degree in the course of this work at Ohio State, and is now at Intel.


News Article | April 7, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Williams Advanced Engineering collaborates with Wille on zero-emission multi-function machines | Main | Hyundai Motor powers world’s first hydrogen fuel cell vehicle car-sharing service » Cummins Inc. has been awarded a $4.5-million grant from the US Department of Energy to develop a Class 6 commercial plug-in hybrid electric vehicle that can reduce fuel consumption by at least 50% over conventional Class 6 vehicles. (Earlier post.) When fully loaded, Class 6 vehicles weigh between approximately 19,000 and 26,000 pounds; typical examples include school buses or single-axle work trucks. With their expertise in internal combustion engines and related products, Cummins researchers will optimize the powertrain by selecting the engine with the best architecture to use as an electric commercial vehicle range extender, using the engine to manage the charge level of the all-electric drive battery pack. The range extender will be integrated, using advanced vehicle controls, with the electrified powertrain and other applicable technologies. Ultimately, the researchers aim to demonstrate improved fuel consumption and state of the art drivability and performance regardless of environmental conditions. Cummins is partnering with PACCAR on the project, and the full team includes representatives from The Ohio State University, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory. The close integration and control of the electrified powertrain with an appropriately selected engine is critically important to developing a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle system. We believe that through the team’s efforts we can soon make these innovations commercially available. The reduction of fuel consumption will be met or exceeded during a wide-range of drive cycles designed to meet the needs of a wide variety of commercial fleet operators. The fuel reduction goals will be achieved through the use of an electrified vehicle powertrain, optimization of the internal combustion engine operation, and other technologies including intelligent transportation systems and electronic braking.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Stephanie Conway, MD Ob/Gyn has joined Northwest Ob/Gyn and is currently accepting new patients at their office in Hilliard. An active member of the medical staff of OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Dr. Conway offers a full continuum of care, from well woman visits and family planning to menopause management and gynecologic surgery. She offers appointment scheduling, refill requests and access to test results online, and provides early morning appointment options for convenience. “I am dedicated to treating every patient like I would want my own family member to be treated,” said Dr. Conway. “I give my patients all the time they need to make sure they are getting the care they need, all of their questions have been answered and they understand all plans of care and next steps.” Dr. Conway received her undergraduate and medical degrees from The Ohio State University. She completed her residency in Ob/Gyn at Riverside Methodist Hospital in 2016. While at Riverside, Dr. Conway was involved with the creation and integration of the eL&D (remote electronic fetal monitoring on Labor and Delivery) program and presented her research project at ACOG’s 2016 Annual Clinical Meeting in Washington, DC. In her free time, she enjoys baking, spending time with her dog Gonzo and watching Buckeye football. Dr. Conway lives in Powell with her husband. “I provide individualized care. No two patients are the same,” said Dr. Conway. “I like to approach each patient interaction like a partnership—work with them to find the best treatment plans for them. I like to promote patient education to help patients be active participants in their care and make well-informed decisions.” Northwest Ob/Gyn offers comprehensive personalized care for all stages of a woman’s life. Their all-female Board Certified Specialists combine expertise ranging from Obstetrics through many areas of Gynecology. To learn more about Northwest Ob/Gyn and request an appointment, visit http://www.northwestobgyn.net. About OhioHealth OhioHealth is a nationally recognized, not-for-profit, charitable, healthcare organization with Methodist roots. Based in Columbus, Ohio, OhioHealth has been recognized as one of the top five large health systems in America by Truven Health Analytics, an honor it has received six times. It is also recognized by FORTUNE Magazine as one of the “100 Best Companies to Work For” and has been for 10 years in a row, 2007-2016. Serving its communities since 1891, it is a family of 28,000 associates, physicians and volunteers, and a network of 11 hospitals, 50+ ambulatory sites, hospice, home-health, medical equipment and other health services spanning a 47-county area. OhioHealth hospitals include OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, OhioHealth Grant Medical Center, OhioHealth Doctors Hospital, OhioHealth Grady Memorial Hospital, OhioHealth Dublin Methodist Hospital, OhioHealth Hardin Memorial Hospital, OhioHealth Marion General Hospital, OhioHealth O’Bleness Hospital, OhioHealth Mansfield Hospital, OhioHealth Shelby Hospital and OhioHealth Rehabilitation Hospital. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.ohiohealth.com.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: co.newswire.com

As part of the dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award program, sponsored by Beiersdorf Inc., five dermatology residents attended the 12th Annual Coastal Dermatology Symposium, held in Monterey, California from September 29 - October 1, 2016. As part of the dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award program, sponsored by Beiersdorf Inc., five dermatology residents attended the 12th Annual Coastal Dermatology Symposium, held in Monterey, California from September 29 - October 1, 2016. The dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction awardees – Lucy Chen, MD, of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Robert Gathings, MD, of The Medical University of South Carolina, Shawn Kwatra, MD, of Johns Hopkins Medicine, Julia Schwartz, MD, of The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and Kelly Tyler, MD, of The Ohio State University College of Medicine – attended the Coastal Dermatology Symposium scientific sessions as well as networking events with top thought leaders in dermatology. The residents presented new scientific research during an independent mentoring session that was held on Friday, September 30. Julia Schwartz, MD, a third-year resident in dermatology at The George Washington University, was awarded the overall grand prize for her presentation, entitled: “Prevalence and comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) in a large patient care database.” DermMentors.org and the dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award program are sponsored by Beiersdorf Inc., and administered by DermEd, Inc. and Evince Communications, LLC. Now in its 7th year, The dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award has recognized top residents in dermatology with sponsorship to attend the Caribbean Dermatology Symposium and the Coastal Dermatology Symposium, and offers selected residents Virtual Mentorship and Mentor Meet-up award opportunities. The dermMentors.org website is dedicated to helping residents during their training and throughout their careers, by providing insights from respected thought leaders, and facilitating and fostering relationships between residents and mentors in dermatology. For more information, visit www.dermMentors.org, or contact Daniel Romanowitz at (203) 354-6953.


News Article | December 15, 2015
Site: www.rdmag.com

Some of the natural gas harvested by hydraulic fracturing operations may be of biological origin--made by microorganisms inadvertently injected into shale by oil and gas companies during the hydraulic fracturing process, a new study has found. The study suggests that microorganisms including bacteria and archaea might one day be used to enhance methane production--perhaps by sustaining the energy a site can produce after fracturing ends. The discovery is a result of the first detailed genomic analysis of bacteria and archaea living in deep fractured shales, and was made possible through a collaboration among universities and industry. The project is also yielding new techniques for tracing the movement of bacteria and methane within wells. Researchers described the project's early results on Monday, Dec. 14, at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. "A lot is happening underground during the hydraulic fracturing process that we're just beginning to learn about," said principal investigator Paula Mouser, assistant professor of civil, environmental and geodetic engineering at The Ohio State University. "The interactions of microorganisms and chemicals introduced into the wells create a fascinating new ecosystem. Some of what we learn could make the wells more productive." Oil and gas companies inject fluid--mostly water drawn from surface reservoirs--underground to break up shale and release the oil and gas--mostly methane--that is trapped inside. Though they've long known about the microbes living inside fracturing wells--and even inject biocides to keep them from clogging the equipment--nobody has known for sure where the bacteria came from until now. "Our results indicate that most of the organisms are coming from the input fluid," said Kelly Wrighton, assistant professor of microbiology and biophysics at Ohio State. "So this means that we're creating a whole new ecosystem a mile below the surface. Not only are we fracturing the rock, we're giving these organisms a new place to live and food to eat. And in fact, the biocides that we add to inhibit their growth may actually be fueling the production of methane." That is, the biocides kill some types of bacteria, thus enabling other bacteria and archaea to prosper--species that somehow find a way to survive in water that is typically four times saltier than the ocean, and under pressures that are typically hundreds of times higher than on the surface of the earth. Deprived of light for photosynthesis, these hardy microorganisms adapt in part by eating chemicals found in the fracturing fluid and producing methane. Next, the researchers want to pinpoint exactly how the bacteria enter the fracturing fluid. It's likely that they normally live in the surface water that makes up the bulk of the fluid. But there's at least one other possibility, Wrighton explained. Oil and gas companies start the fracturing process by putting fresh water into giant blenders, where chemicals are added. The blenders are routinely swapped between sites, and sometimes companies re-use some of the well's production fluid. So it's possible that the bacteria live inside the equipment and propagate from well to well. In the next phase of the study, the team will sample site equipment to find out. The clues emerged when the researchers began using genomic tools to construct a kind of metabolic blueprint for life living inside wells, Wrighton explained. "We look at the fluid that comes out of the well," she said. "We take all the genes and enzymes in that fluid and create a picture of what the whole microbial community is doing. We can see whether they survive, what they eat and how they interact with each other." The Ohio State researchers are working with partners at West Virginia University to test the fluids taken from a well operated by Northeast Natural Energy in West Virginia. For more than a year, they've regularly measured the genes, enzymes and chemical isotopes in used fracturing fluid drawn from the well. Within around 80 days after injection, the researchers found, the organisms inside the well settle into a kind of food chain that Wrighton described this way: Some bacteria eat the fracturing fluid and produce new chemicals, which other bacteria eat. Those bacteria then produce other chemicals, and so on. The last metabolic step ends with certain species of archaea producing methane. Tests also showed that initially small bacterial populations sometimes bloom into prominence underground. In one case, a particular species that made up only 4 percent of the microbial life going into the well emerged in the used fracturing fluid at levels of 60 percent. "In terms of the resilience of life, it's new insight for me into the capabilities of microorganisms." The researchers are working to describe the nature of pathways along which fluids migrate in shale, develop tracers to track fluid migration and biological processes, and identify habitable zones where life might thrive in the deep, hot terrestrial subsurface. For example, Michael Wilkins, assistant professor of earth sciences and microbiology at Ohio State, leads a part of the project that grows bacteria under high pressure and high temperature conditions. "Our aim is to understand how the microorganisms operate under such conditions, given that it's likely they've been injected from surface sources, and are accustomed to living at much lower temperatures and normal atmospheric pressure. We're also hoping to see how geochemical signatures of microbial activity, such as methane isotopes, change in these environments," Wilkins said. Other aspects of the project involve studying how liquid, gas and rock interact underground. In Ohio State's Subsurface Materials Characterization and Analysis Laboratory, Director David Cole models the geochemical reactions taking place inside shale wells. The professor of earth sciences and Ohio Research Scholar is uncovering reaction rates for the migration of chemicals inside shale. Using tools such as advanced electron microscopy, micro-X-ray computed tomography and neutron scattering, Cole's group studies the pores that form inside shale. The pores range in size from the diameter of a human hair to many times smaller, and early results suggest that connections between these pores may enable microorganisms to access food and room to grow. Yet another part of the project involves developing new ways to track the methane produced by the bacteria, as well as the methane released from shale fracturing. Thomas Darrah, assistant professor of earth sciences, is developing computer models that trace the pathways fluids follow within the shale and within fracturing equipment. Though oil and gas companies may not be able to take full advantage of this newly discovered methane source for some time, Wrighton pointed out that there are already examples of bio-assisted methane production in industry, particularly in coal bed methane operations. "Hydraulic fracturing is a young industry," she said. "It may take decades, but it's possible that biogenesis will play a role in its future. Other researchers on the project hail from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maine.


News Article | January 26, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Fecal transplant may sound gross but according to a new study from Ohio State University, fecal transplants may actually be beneficial to children with autism. Fecal transplant, otherwise known as bacteriotherapy, is the method of introducing microbes from healthy donors into the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of people suffering from severe stomach problems, such as recurrent C. difficile colitis. Fecal transplant efficiently replenishes the good bacteria or probiotics that have been killed or suppressed, usually through the excessive use of antibiotics. In the study, the researchers used microbiota transfer therapy or fecal microbiota transplant (FMT). In FMT, fecal sample is collected from the healthy donor, mixed with a saline or other solution, filtered, and transferred to the patient via colonoscopy, endoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, or enema. "Transplants are working for people with other gastrointestinal problems. And, with autism, gastrointestinal symptoms are often severe, so we thought this could be potentially valuable," said Ann Gregory, one of the study's lead authors and a microbiology graduate student at The Ohio State University. The study, which is set to be published in the journal Microbiome, looked into 18 kids diagnosed with autism and moderate to severe GI conditions. Both doctors and parents reported that they saw positive changes in all of the participants' stomach health and behavior autism symptoms that lasted eight weeks after the fecal transplant treatment was done. Nevertheless, parents with autistic children should never attempt to do fecal transplant at home. "More research is needed before this can be used for treatment," Gregory warned. "Microbiota should be very carefully screened, and the treatment should be done under medical supervision." Gastrointestinal disorders are consistently seen among children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Research shows 70 percent of the children with ASD had GI issues compared to 42 percent of the children with developmental disorder other than ASD. Autistic individuals, like everyone else, are also susceptible to gastritis, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and severe food allergies. The exact reason behind why GI disorders are more pervasive in children with autism is yet unknown. However, there is a push for researchers to focus their work on addressing autism during the early life of children. "Even though GI symptoms are common in early childhood, physicians should be mindful that children with ASD may be experiencing more GI difficulties in the first three years of life," autism researchers from Columbia University, wrote in the March 25 issue of the journal JAMA Psychiatry. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

For the first time, researchers have created light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on lightweight flexible metal foil. Engineers at The Ohio State University are developing the foil based LEDs for portable ultraviolet (UV) lights that soldiers and others can use to purify drinking water and sterilize medical equipment. In the journal Applied Physics Letters, the researchers describe how they designed the LEDs to shine in the high-energy “deep” end of the UV spectrum. The university will license the technology to industry for further development. Deep UV light is already used by the military, humanitarian organizations and industry for applications ranging from detection of biological agents to curing plastics, explains Roberto Myers, associate professor of materials science and engineering at Ohio State. The problem is that conventional deep-UV lamps are too heavy to easily carry around. “Right now, if you want to make deep ultraviolet light, you’ve got to use mercury lamps,” says Myers, who is also an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. “Mercury is toxic and the lamps are bulky and electrically inefficient. LEDs, on the other hand, are really efficient, so if we could make UV LEDs that are safe and portable and cheap, we could make safe drinking water wherever we need it.” He noted that other research groups have fabricated deep-UV LEDs at the laboratory scale, but only by using extremely pure, rigid single-crystal semiconductors as substrates — a strategy that imposes an enormous cost barrier for industry. Foil-based nanotechnology could enable large-scale production of a lighter, cheaper and more environmentally friendly deep-UV LED. But Myers and materials science doctoral student Brelon J. May hope that their technology will do something more: turn a niche research field known as nanophotonics into a viable industry. “People always said that nanophotonics will never be commercially important, because you can’t scale them up. Well, now we can. We can make a sheet of them if we want,” Myers says. “That means we can consider nanophotonics for large-scale manufacturing.” In part, this new development relies on a well-established semiconductor growth technique known as molecular beam epitaxy, in which vaporized elemental materials settle on a surface and self-organize into layers or nanostructures. The Ohio State researchers used this technique to grow a carpet of tightly packed aluminum gallium nitride wires on pieces of metal foil such as titanium and tantalum. The individual wires measure about 200 nanometers tall and about 20-50 nanometers in diameter — thousands of times narrower than a human hair and invisible to the naked eye. In laboratory tests, the nanowires grown on metal foils lit up nearly as brightly as those manufactured on the more expensive and less flexible single-crystal silicon. The researchers are working to make the nanowire LEDs even brighter, and will next try to grow the wires on foils made from more common metals, including steel and aluminum. This research was funded by the Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation. Study co-author A.T.M. Golam Sarwar earned his doctoral degree in the course of this work at Ohio State, and is now at Intel.


News Article | October 11, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Indiana University researchers have reported the first definitive evidence for a new molecular structure with potential applications to the safe storage of nuclear waste and reduction of chemicals that contaminate water and trigger large fish kills. The study, which was published online Oct. 6 in the German scientific journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, provides experimental proof for the existence of a chemical bond between two negatively charged molecules of bisulfate, or HSO4. The existence of this structure -- a "supramolecule" with two negatively charged ions -- was once regarded as impossible since it appears to defy a nearly 250-year-old chemical law that has recently come under new scrutiny. "An anion-anion dimerization of bisulfate goes against simple expectations of Coulomb's law," said IU professor Amar Flood, who is the senior author on the study. "But the structural evidence we present in this paper shows two hydroxy anions can in fact be chemically bonded. We believe the long-range repulsions between these anions are offset by short-range attractions." Flood is a professor in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Chemistry. The first author on the study is Elisabeth Fatila, a postdoctoral researcher in Flood’s lab. In molecular chemistry, two monomer molecules connected by a strong covalent bond are called a "dimer." (A polymer is a chain of many monomers.) In supramolecular chemistry, the dimers are connected by many weak non-covalent bonds. A negatively charged particle is an anion. A key part of Coulomb's law is the idea that two molecules with the same charge create a repellent force that prevents chemical bonding -- like two magnets with the same end put into close contact. But recently, experts have begun to argue that negatively charged molecules with hydrogen atoms, such as a bisulfate -- composed of hydrogen, sulfur and oxygen – can also form viable chemical bonds. "Although supramolecular chemistry started out as an effort to create new molecular hosts that hold on to complementary molecular guests through non-covalent bonds, the field has recently branched out to explore non-covalent interactions between the guests in order to create new 'chemical species,'"  Fatila said. The negatively charged bisulfate dimer in the IU study employs a self-complementary, anti-electrostatic hydrogen bond. The molecule's existence is made possible through encapsulation inside a pair of cyanostar macrocycles, a molecule previously developed by Flood’s lab at IU. Fatila and colleagues were trying to bind a single bisulfate molecule inside the cyanostar; the presence of two negatively charged bisulfate ions was a surprise. "This paper is inspirational because it may launch a new approach to supramolecular ion recognition," said Jonathan Sessler, a professor of chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin who was not involved in the study. "I expect this will be the start of something new and important in the field." The ability to produce a negatively charged bisulfate dimer might also advance the search for chemical solutions to several environmental challenges. Due to their ion-extraction properties, the molecules could potentially be used to remove sulfate ions from the process used to transform nuclear waste into storable solids -- a method called vitrification, which is harmed by these ions -- as well as to extract harmful phosphate ions from the environment. "The eutrophication of lakes is just one example of the serious threat to the environment caused by the runoff of phosphates from fertilizers," Flood said, referring to uncontrolled plant growth that results from excess phosphate nutrients running into lakes and ocean. When these chemicals get into the water supply as runoff from fertilizer -- produced by dairy farms and used to increase crop yields -- they can trigger massive algae blooms that poison water supplies and kill fish in large numbers. In August, Flood was also named the principal investigator on a new, separate grant from the National Science Foundationto specifically focus on removing these substances from the environment. The three-year, $600,000 award is a collaboration with Heather Allen, a professor at The Ohio State University, which is near a part of the country that has recently experienced large algae blooms due to agricultural runoff into Lake Erie. The new molecule in the study was detected using equipment at the IU Bloomington Department of Chemistry's Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility, the Laboratory for Biological Mass Spectrometry and the IU Molecular Structure Center. Study co-authors are professor Krishnan Raghavachari, associate scientist  Jonathan A. Karty, research associate Eric B. Twum, senior scientist Maren Pink and Ph.D. student Arkajyoti Sengupta, all of the IU Bloomington Department of Chemistry. Pink is also director of the IU Molecular Structure Center. Karty is the manager for the Mass Spectrometry lab. Twum is a spectroscopist in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility. This study was first reported at the 11th International Symposium on Macrocyclic and Supramolecular Chemistry in Seoul, South Korea. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation. The cynostar macrocycle developed by Flood's lab is the subject of a pending patent filed by the IU Research and Technology Corp.


News Article | December 4, 2015
Site: www.cemag.us

Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC — James) have developed nanoparticles that swell and burst when exposed to near-infrared laser light. Such “nanobombs” might overcome a biological barrier that has blocked development of agents that work by altering the activity — the expression — of genes in cancer cells. The agents might kill cancer cells outright or stall their growth. The kinds of agents that change gene expression are generally forms of RNA (ribonucleic acid), and they are notoriously difficult to use as drugs. First, they are readily degraded when free in the bloodstream. In this study, packaging them in nanoparticles that target tumor cells solved that problem. This study, published in the journal Advanced Materials, suggests that the nanobombs might also solve the second problem. When cancer cells take up ordinary nanoparticles, they often enclose them in small compartments called endosomes. This prevents the drug molecules from reaching their target, and they are soon degraded. Along with the therapeutic agent, these nanoparticles contain a chemical that vaporizes, causing them to swell three times or more in size when exposed to near-infrared laser light. The endosomes burst, dispersing the RNA agent into the cell. “A major challenge to using nanoparticles to deliver gene-regulating agents such as microRNAs is the inability of the nanoparticles to escape the compartments, the endosomes, that they are encased in when cells take up the particles,” says principal investigator Xiaoming (Shawn) He, PhD, associate professor of Biomedical Engineering and member of the OSUCCC — James Translational Therapeutics Program. “We believe we’ve overcome this challenge by developing nanoparticles that include ammonium bicarbonate, a small molecule that vaporizes when exposing the nanoparticles to near-infrared laser light, causing the nanoparticle and endosome to burst, releasing the therapeutic RNA,” He explains. For their study, He and colleagues used human prostate-cancer cells and human prostate tumors in an animal model. The nanoparticles were equipped to target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), which are cancer cells that have properties of stem cells. CSCs often resist therapy and are thought to play an important role in cancer development and recurrence. The therapeutic agent in the nanoparticles was a form of microRNA called miR-34a. The researchers chose this molecule because it can lower the levels of a protein that is crucial for CSC survival and may be involved in chemotherapy and radiation therapy resistance. The nanoparticles also encapsulate ammonium bicarbonate, which is a leavening agent sometimes used in baking. Near-infrared laser light, which induces vaporization of the ammonium bicarbonate, can penetrate tissue to a depth of one centimeter (nearly half an inch). For deeper tumors, the light would be delivered using minimally invasive surgery. Funding from an American Cancer Society Research Scholar Grant and a Pelotonia Postdoctoral Fellowship supported this research. Other researchers involved in this study were Hai Wang, Pranay Agarwal, Shuting Zhao and Jianhua Yu, all of The Ohio State University; and Xiongbin Lu of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Editors: An online press kit is available at www.NCCN.org/justbagit As part of its mission to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) today announced the launch of Just Bag It: The NCCN Campaign for Safe Vincristine Handling. This campaign encourages health care providers to adopt a policy to always dilute and administer vincristine in a mini IV-drip bag to prevent a deadly medical error. Vincristine is a chemotherapy agent, widely used in patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma, which should be administered intravenously, or directly into the patient's vein. When it enters the blood, it is highly effective at blocking the growth of cancer by preventing cells from separating. However, vincristine is a neurotoxin that causes peripheral neuropathy when given intravenously and profound neurotoxicity if given into the spinal fluid, which flows around the spinal cord and brain. Many patients who receive vincristine have a treatment regimen that includes other chemotherapy drugs that are administered intrathecally, or injected into the spinal fluid with a syringe. If vincristine is mistakenly administered into the spinal fluid, it is uniformly fatal, causing ascending paralysis, neurological defects, and eventually death. In 2005, NCCN Chief Executive Officer Robert W. Carlson, MD, a medical oncologist, witnessed such a tragedy with a 21 year-old patient with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma named Christopher Wibeto. Wibeto was transferred to Carlson's care after receiving incorrectly administered vincristine at another hospital. Carlson watched the young man go from having a likely curable condition to deteriorating and dying within four days. Motivated by this tragic experience, Carlson spearheaded a national effort to address this deadly error when he arrived at NCCN, enlisting the help of its Best Practices Committee, which is dedicated to improving cancer treatment protocols. To ensure that vincristine is always administered properly, NCCN has issued guidelines advising health care providers to always dilute and administer vincristine in a mini IV-drip bag and never use a syringe to administer the medication. This precaution renders it impossible to accidentally administer the medication into the spinal fluid and greatly decreases the chances of improper dosage. All 27 NCCN Member Institutions have adopted policies in line with these guidelines, which are also recommended by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, the Joint Commission, the World Health Organization, and the Oncology Nursing Society. "We are proud of this achievement and grateful for the support and participation of our Member Institutions in reaching this goal," Carlson said. "Our efforts will not stop here. We challenge all medical centers, hospitals, and oncology practices around the nation and the world to implement this medication safety policy so this error never occurs again." Surveys issued by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) show that over time, more hospitals have adopted a policy to always bag vincristine. According to ISMP data, the number of hospitals that have fully implemented the policy across their practice nearly doubled between February 2014 and February 2016. Earlier surveys indicated a similar increase between 2005 and 2012. Still, only about half of all respondents indicated that they have implemented the policy in all treatment settings, indicating that there is a long way to go. With 125 known cases of accidental death in the U.S. and abroad since the inception of vincristine use in the 1960s, this error is relatively rare. Still, it is unique in its level of mortality. Improvements in practice over the years, including manufacturer- and pharmacist-issued warning labels, have reduced the number of deaths, but the error continues to occur. Diluting vincristine into a mini IV-drip bag may entail a change in practice for some providers, but it is well worth the outcome of avoiding preventable deaths, according to Michael Cohen, RPh, MS, FASHP, President of ISMP. "One more life taken is one too many," Cohen said. "We are glad an organization of NCCN's influence has stepped up to bring this issue to national attention. Ending this devastating error should be a priority for all of us who care for and advocate on behalf of patients and their families." Some health care providers may associate the use of an IV bag with a heightened risk of extravasation, or the leaking of a chemotherapy drug into the tissue surrounding the intravenous administration site. But research shows that the risk of extravasation is extremely low. [1] "The Just Bag It campaign is the latest of NCCN's long-standing efforts to improve the safe use of drugs in cancer care," said F. Marc Stewart, MD, Medical Director of the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and Member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Professor of Medicine at University of Washington, and Co-Chair of the NCCN Best Practices Committee. "For more than 15 years, the Best Practices Committee has worked to ensure the highest standards of safety for patients." In 2008, the Best Practices Committee led the charge for NCCN to begin publishing Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates®), which detail the most common regimens for many cancers and highlight safety parameters. These resources enable practitioners to standardize patient care, reduce medication errors, and anticipate and manage adverse events. There are more than 1,500 NCCN Templates® for 86 cancer types, and they are used by more than 10,000 subscribers. For more information about Just Bag It: The NCCN Campaign for Safe Vincristine Handling, or to report that a medical facility has adopted a vincristine policy, visit www.NCCN.org/JustBagIt. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 of the world's leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. [1] ISMP. Death and neurological devastation from intrathecal vinca alkaloids: Prepared in syringes = 120; Prepared in minibags = 0. ISMP Medication Safety Alert! 2013;18(18):3. The following files are available for download:


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- One in every six colorectal cancer patients (16 percent) diagnosed under age 50 has at least one inherited genetic mutation that increases his or her cancer risk and many of these mutations could go undetected with the current screening approach, according to initial data from a statewide colorectal cancer screening study conducted at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). In this new analysis, the OSUCCC - James team offers the first detailed report of the prevalence and spectrum of specific mutations in 25 genes associated with inherited (passed down through families) cancer syndromes in an unselected series of colorectal cancer patients. The study includes data from 450 patients with early-onset colorectal cancer recruited from a network of hospitals throughout the state of Ohio. "The prevalence of hereditary cancer syndromes among early-onset colorectal cancer patients - including Lynch syndrome - was quite high, which presents a tremendous opportunity for us to save lives through early detection based on genomic risk factors," says Heather Hampel, MS, CGC, principal investigator of the statewide study and senior author of the paper. "It is critical that people find out at a young age if they are genetically predisposed to cancer so they can take steps to prevent cancer from occurring at all." Multi-gene testing uses next-generation sequencing to screen multiple cancer genes simultaneously with one blood sample. Previous studies have shown that multi-gene panel testing for hereditary colorectal cancer is feasible, timely and more cost-effective than single gene testing, but the utility of such testing in this patient population was previously unknown. Based on this new data, the OSUCCC - James research team recommends genetic counseling and a broad, multi-gene panel test of cancer susceptibility genes for all early-onset colorectal cancer patients, regardless of family history or the results of tumor screening for Lynch syndrome. This differs from current professional guidelines, which recommend all colorectal cancer patients be screened for Lynch syndrome, with referral for genetic counseling and Lynch syndrome-specific genetic testing if the tumor-screening test is abnormal. The team's findings, however, showed that 33 percent of patients found to have an inherited cancer syndrome did not meet established testing criteria for the gene in which they were found to have a mutation. "We expected to find a high rate of Lynch syndrome among these early-onset colon cancer patients. What was surprising were some of the other gene mutations found in the young colorectal cancer patients, including mutations in genes traditionally linked to breast cancer risk, even in patients whose family history was not suggestive of those mutations," said Rachel Pearlman, MS, CGC, first author of the paper and statewide study coordinator. "Until multi-gene panel testing, we typically would not have tested a patient with colorectal cancer for mutations in those genes unless they met criteria based on their family history. There is still a lot to learn from these findings." They report their findings in the Dec. 15, 2016, issue of the medical journal JAMA Oncology. For this study, researchers recruited 450 patients who had undergone surgery for newly diagnosed, invasive colorectal cancer on or after Jan. 1, 2013. All were between the ages of 17 and 49 and enrolled in the Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative (OCCPI), a statewide colon cancer screening and prevention study aimed at screening all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients in Ohio for Lynch syndrome and other hereditary cancer syndromes. Led by Hampel, the OCCPI includes 51 hospital partners across the state of Ohio. Blood and tumor samples were collected from each patient and tumor pathology characteristics were verified prior to testing. All tumors were screened for microsatellite instability and/or abnormal immunohistochemistry, characteristics that are found in cancers from individuals with Lynch syndrome. All colorectal cancer patients diagnosed under age 50 underwent genetic testing for 25 cancer susceptibility genes [including the genes that cause Lynch syndrome (MLH1, MSH2, EPCAM, PMS2 and MSH6)] using a multi-gene panel. Overall, 75 cancer susceptibility gene mutations were identified in 72 patients. Eight percent (36 patients) had Lynch syndrome only, 0.4 percent (2 patients) had Lynch syndrome plus another hereditary cancer syndrome, 7.6 percent (34 patients) had a different hereditary cancer syndrome (including a third patient with two syndromes). "Our study shows that the spectrum of mutations in early-onset colorectal cancer is much broader than we originally thought -- both in the number of different gene mutations causing this disease and rates at which they occur," adds Hampel. "We believe this data offers additional support for complete genetic testing for all early-onset colorectal patients. This could save lives by identifying at-risk families so that they can benefit from intensive cancer surveillance and prevention options." Funding for this research study was provided by Pelotonia, an annual cycling event held in Columbus, Ohio, to raise money for cancer research at the OSUCCC - James. Myriad Genetics donated genetic testing for the patients diagnosed under age 50 who had normal tumor screening test results. Co-authors on the study include Rachel Pearlman, MS, CGC, Wendy Frankel, MD, Benjamin Swanson, MD, Weiqiang Zhao, MD, PhD, Ahmet Yilmaz, PhD, Kristin Miller, Jason Bacher, Christopher Bigley, MS, Lori Nelsen, Paul Goodfellow, PhD, Richard Goldberg, MD, Electra Paskett, PhD, Peter Shields, MD, Jo Freudenheim, PhD, Peter Stanich, MD, Ilene Lattimer, Mark Arnold, MD, Sandya LIyanarachchi, MS, Matthew Kalady, MD, Brandie Heald, MS, CGC, Carla Greenwood, Ian Paquette, MD, Marla Prues, David Draper, MD, Carolyn Lindeman, J. Philip Kuebler, MD, PhD, Kelly Reynolds, Joanna Brell, MD, Amy Shaper, MSW, Sameer Mahesh, MD, Nicole Buie, Kisa Weeman, MD, Kristin Shine, Mitchell Haut, MD, Joan Edwards, Shyamal Bastola, MD, Karen Wickham, Karamjit Khanduja, MD, Rosemary Zacks, Colin Pritchard, MD, PhD, Brian Shirts, MD, PhD, Angela Jacobson, MS, CGC, Brian Allen, MS, CGC, Albert de la Chapelle, MD, PhD. Ten authors disclose potential conflicts of interest, outlined specifically in the manuscript. To learn more about the statewide colorectal cancer screening initiative at the OSUCCC-James, visit cancer.osu.edu/OCCPI or call 1-888-329-1654. Patients diagnosed in the state of Ohio from January 2013 to present may qualify to participate. Enrollment to the OCCPI study ends Dec. 31, 2016. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 45 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only four centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs. As the cancer program's 306-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, please visit cancer.osu.edu.


The study, which appears online today in the German scientific journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, provides experimental proof for the existence of a chemical bond between two negatively charged molecules of bisulfate, or HSO . The existence of this structure—a "supramolecule" with two negatively charged ions—was once regarded as impossible since it appears to defy a nearly 250-year-old chemical law that has recently come under new scrutiny. "An anion-anion dimerization of bisulfate goes against simple expectations of Coulomb's law," said IU professor Amar Flood, who is the senior author on the study. "But the structural evidence we present in this paper shows two hydroxy anions can in fact be chemically bonded. We believe the long-range repulsions between these anions are offset by short-range attractions." Flood is a professor in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Chemistry. The first author on the study is Elisabeth Fatila, a postdoctoral researcher in Flood's lab. In molecular chemistry, two monomer molecules connected by a strong covalent bond are called a "dimer." (A polymer is a chain of many monomers.) In supramolecular chemistry, the dimers are connected by many weak non-covalent bonds. A negatively charged particle is an anion. A key part of Coulomb's law is the idea that two molecules with the same charge create a repellent force that prevents chemical bonding—like two magnets with the same end put into close contact. But recently, experts have begun to argue that negatively charged molecules with hydrogen atoms, such as a bisulfate—composed of hydrogen, sulfur and oxygen - can also form viable chemical bonds. "Although supramolecular chemistry started out as an effort to create new molecular hosts that hold on to complementary molecular guests through non-covalent bonds, the field has recently branched out to explore non-covalent interactions between the guests in order to create new 'chemical species,'" Fatila said. The negatively charged bisulfate dimer in the IU study employs a self-complementary, anti-electrostatic hydrogen bond. The molecule's existence is made possible through encapsulation inside a pair of cyanostar macrocycles, a molecule previously developed by Flood's lab at IU. Fatila and colleagues were trying to bind a single bisulfate molecule inside the cyanostar; the presence of two negatively charged bisulfate ions was a surprise. "This paper is inspirational because it may launch a new approach to supramolecular ion recognition," said Jonathan Sessler, a professor of chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin who was not involved in the study. "I expect this will be the start of something new and important in the field." The ability to produce a negatively charged bisulfate dimer might also advance the search for chemical solutions to several environmental challenges. Due to their ion-extraction properties, the molecules could potentially be used to remove sulfate ions from the process used to transform nuclear waste into storable solids—a method called vitrification, which is harmed by these ions—as well as to extract harmful phosphate ions from the environment. "The eutrophication of lakes is just one example of the serious threat to the environment caused by the runoff of phosphates from fertilizers," Flood said, referring to uncontrolled plant growth that results from excess phosphate nutrients running into lakes and ocean. When these chemicals get into the water supply as runoff from fertilizer—produced by dairy farms and used to increase crop yields—they can trigger massive algae blooms that poison water supplies and kill fish in large numbers. In August, Flood was also named the principal investigator on a new, separate grant from the National Science Foundation to specifically focus on removing these substances from the environment. The three-year, $600,000 award is a collaboration with Heather Allen, a professor at The Ohio State University, which is near a part of the country that has recently experienced large algae blooms due to agricultural runoff into Lake Erie. The new molecule in the study was detected using equipment at the IU Bloomington Department of Chemistry's Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility, the Laboratory for Biological Mass Spectrometry and the IU Molecular Structure Center. Study co-authors are professor Krishnan Raghavachari, associate scientist Jonathan A. Karty, research associate Eric B. Twum, senior scientist Maren Pink and Ph.D. student Arkajyoti Sengupta, all of the IU Bloomington Department of Chemistry. Pink is also director of the IU Molecular Structure Center. Karty is the manager for the Mass Spectrometry lab. Twum is a spectroscopist in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility. This study was first reported at the 11th International Symposium on Macrocyclic and Supramolecular Chemistry in Seoul, South Korea. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation. The cynostar macrocycle developed by Flood's lab is the subject of a pending patent filed by the IU Research and Technology Corp.


News Article | September 2, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Tall people are better than short people at gauging how far away they are from objects in the middle distance, a new study reports. The researchers say the results are evidence for the idea that people's spatial perception abilities are influenced by their height, and develop over time. The human brain depends on a certain model to provide "the best guess of where objects could be located," said study co-author Teng Leng Ooi, a professor of optometry at The Ohio State University. That model, or "intrinsic bias," is typically revealed when people have very little information about where an object is located, e.g., literally in the dark, and must make an educated guess. People usually underestimate the distance between themselves and an object, and as objects get farther away, the effect gets larger. "Our previous studies have shown that the intrinsic bias is an imaginary curve that extends from one's feet and slants upward to the far distance," Ooi told Live Science in an email. In the new study, 24 people were split into two groups of 12, based on their height. The average height (measured at the eyes) in the groups were 4 feet 11 inches (149.3 cm) and 5 feet 8 inches (173.4 cm). Over three experiments, objects were presented in different levels of light, with different amounts of information to help determine location. The people then guessed the distances to objects by a variety of means, such as pacing out the distance with their eyes closed, so the study was not dependent on the subjects' sense of units of measure. The results showed that the people in both tall and short groups showed the bias, increasingly misjudging the distance to far-away objects. However, the taller participants were more accurate in their guesses, and the difference in performance between groups was consistent across all conditions, the researchers said. When tall participants sat in a chair and shorter participants stood on boxes to adjust their eye levels, the tall people were still more accurate in the middle distances. Because previous experiments showed people are better judges of distance from a higher vantage point, the researchers said, the new result is evidence that taller people have accumulated experience in guessing the distance to objects, and that their height has shaped a mental model of distances. However, other researchers said they were skeptical of the findings. "I'm a little bit dubious of the results," that show taller people are better at guessing distances, said Maryjane Wraga, a psychologist at Smith College in Massachusetts, who was not involved in the study. Because of variations in individuals' vision, Wraga said, the study, with only 12 participants in each group, would have benefited from more participants. Any pattern that emerged based on the study groups might be consistent since all three experiments used the same participants. Furthermore, "if it's a true effect, it's a modest effect." Wraga told Live Science. The differences in performance between the height groups at distances up to about 33 feet (10 meters) were small, Wraga said, and most people interact with those closer objects much more often in their daily lives. "It's not a uniform effect; it's mostly occurring for distances that are farther away." "The ideas that they're presenting are very interesting," John Philbeck, a psychologist at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., told Live Science. But he was also concerned about replicating the results, and called the sample size "a little on the thin side." "If this effect is real, there are ways to compensate for it in the real world," Wraga said, such as moving our heads and bodies to gather more information, which people probably do naturally, but was restricted in the experiments to specifically test the mental model. How should shorter people feel about the results? "Not worried at all," Wraga said. The researchers said they are interested in future studies with more subjects in a range of heights, development in children and investigating whether animals have different visual biases, possibly based on their ecological niche. The study was published today (Aug. 31) in the journal Science Advances. Copyright 2016 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


COLUMBUS, Ohio--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Members of all Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield (Anthem) Medicare Advantage (MA) plans in Ohio will now have access to The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and its facilities as in-network providers. The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center includes University Hospital, University Hospital East, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute, Ross Heart Hospital, Brain and Spine Hospital, Harding Hospital and Dodd Hall Rehabilitation Hospital. Together, these hospitals have more than 1,300 beds serving nearly 59,360 patients annually. Ohio State Wexner Medical Center has led the region for 24 years in U.S. News & World Report’s “America's Best Hospitals” rankings. These facilities will now be in network for all Anthem MediBlue MA plans, including Essential (HMO), Dual Advantage (HMO SNP), Plus (HMO), Access (PPO), Access Enhanced (PPO), Access Core (Regional PPO) and Access (Regional PPO). “Ohio State Wexner Medical Center has a longstanding reputation in the region for superior patient care, quality outcomes and patient safety,” said David McNichols, president of Medicare products for Anthem’s central region. “We are very excited that its facilities are now available in our network as part of our overall mission of providing our members with access to affordable, high-quality care.” For more information about Anthem Medicare plans, visit www.anthem.com or call (855) 866-4242. Anthem is a PPO plan, an HMO plan and a PDP plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Anthem depends on contract renewal. The provider network may change at any time. You will receive notice when necessary. This plan is available to anyone who has both Medical Assistance from the State and Medicare. Premiums, co-pays, co-insurance and deductibles may vary based on the level of Extra Help you receive. Please contact the plan for further details. Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield is the trade name of Anthem Insurance Companies, Inc., an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ANTHEM is a registered trademark of Anthem Insurance Companies, Inc. The Blue Cross and Blue Shield names and symbols are registered marks of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Additional information about Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield in Ohio is available at www.anthem.com. Also follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AnthemPR_OH or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/AskAnthem.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Providing access to NCCN Templates® through Cerner's PowerChart Oncology™ will help practitioners make informed treatment decisions based on up-to-date, standard protocols FORT WASHINGTON, PA--(Marketwired - November 15, 2016) - The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) is collaborating with Cerner to integrate the NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates®) into PowerChart Oncology™, the oncology-specific solution within Cerner's electronic health record (EHR), as electronic chemotherapy protocols for use by health care providers. NCCN Templates® will be available for PowerChart Oncology users in 2017. "We are collaborating with Cerner to provide practitioners with access to evidence-based treatment protocols at the point of care to help provide patients with the most up-to-date regimens possible for their specific diagnoses," said Dr. Robert W. Carlson, CEO, NCCN. As part of the integration, Cerner's EHR will link to NCCN.org, providing end-user access to NCCN Templates and the corresponding NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®), helping practitioners make treatment decisions based on up-to-date, evidence-based standard protocols. "At Cerner, we constantly work to provide solutions that support the oncology care team as they make the best treatment decisions possible. Our collaboration with NCCN will further this mission by providing clinicians with direct access to the evidence-based NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates in their PowerChart Oncology workflow," said Susan Stiles, Oncology solution executive at Cerner. "We have always recommended that clients use NCCN Guidelines® and NCCN Templates and now they will be integrated into PowerChart Oncology. This will help providers follow the most up-to-date treatment plans and be more available to focus on what is most important, their patients." The information contained in the NCCN Templates is based on the NCCN Guidelines. NCCN Templates include chemotherapy and immunotherapy regimens with literature support, supportive care agents, monitoring parameters and safety instructions. A goal of the NCCN Templates is to enhance patient safety by empowering health care providers to standardize patient care, reduce medical errors, and anticipate and manage adverse events. NCCN continues to expand the library of chemotherapy order templates to work toward improved safe and effective use of drugs and biologics in cancer care. For more information about NCCN Templates, visit NCCN.org/templates. Cerner's health information technologies connect people, information and systems at more than 25,000 provider facilities worldwide. Recognized for innovation, Cerner solutions assist clinicians in making care decisions and enable organizations to manage the health of populations. The company also offers an integrated clinical and financial system to help health care organizations manage revenue, as well as a wide range of services to support clients' clinical, financial and operational needs. Cerner's mission is to contribute to the systemic improvement of health care delivery and the health of communities. Nasdaq: CERN. For more information about Cerner, visit cerner.com, read our blog at blogs.cerner.com, connect with us on Twitter at twitter.com/cerner and on Facebook at facebook.com/cerner. Our website, blog, Twitter account and Facebook page contain a significant amount of information about Cerner, including financial and other information for investors. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 of the world's leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. The following files are available for download:


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, National Disability Institute (NDI) assembled policymakers, stakeholders and thought leaders at the Ohio Union in Columbus, Ohio for a first of its kind Financial Inclusion Summit. The Summit addressed the financial knowledge and skill gaps of Americans with disabilities and the barriers that prevent their full participation in the economic mainstream. "Twenty-six years after the signing into law of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there remain persistent barriers to economic self-sufficiency for people with disabilities," Michael Morris, Executive Director, National Disability Institute, said. "We must make it a priority in this country to connect leaders from both the disability community and financial services sector, as well as policy makers, employers, regulators, self-advocates and family members to design the next generation of collective efforts to fulfill the ADA's promise of economic self-sufficiency. Equal opportunity must include options to build the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed financial decisions, access to financial education and coaching, affordable and accessible financial services and products, inclusion in career pathways and the ability to save and build assets." Said Mayor Andrew J. Ginther, "We are incredibly honored to be hosting a Summit that addresses such an important issue: assuring people with disabilities have access to mainstream financial services." Collaborating organizations for the event included Apprisen, City of Columbus, Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, Disability Rights Ohio, Goodwill Columbus, Ohio Bankers League, Ohio Office of the Treasurer, Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council, STABLE Account and Columbus Urban League. As the nation's first nonprofit dedicated exclusively to improving the financial health and future of all people across the spectrum of disability, NDI has long documented the unique financial challenges and hurdles individuals with disabilities face. Two NDI reports, The Financial Capability of Adults with Disabilities and The Banking Status and Financial Behaviors of Adults with Disabilities, provided critical data and research which served as catalysts for today's presentation and group discussions. Findings from the reports include:    81 percent of people with disabilities did not have an emergency fund to cover three months of expenses, as compared to 54 percent of people without disabilities;     70 percent of people with disabilities responded they could not come up with $2,000 in an emergency, as compared to 37 percent of people without disabilities;     Only 18 percent of people with disabilities had determined their retirement savings needs, as compared to 41 percent of people without disabilities;     Among households headed by working-age persons with disability, nearly one-fifth were unbanked (18 percent) and more than one-fourth were underbanked (28 percent); and     Households headed by working-age persons with disability were significantly less likely to have a savings account compared to households headed by those without disability. (47 percent vs. 72 percent, respectively). The overflow crowd at the Summit heard from a diverse set of speakers representing both public and private interests and the nonprofit sector. Special guests included: Amy Furash, Executive Director, Business Operations, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Richard Isbell, ADA Coordinator, Office of the Mayor; Courtney Mullin, Project Manager, Ohio DB 101, Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, Employment First; Brandy Avery, Director of Financial Empowerment Services, Columbus Urban League; Stephanie Hoffer, Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law; Katie Frederick, Executive Director, American Council of the Blind of Ohio; Alice Coday, Financial Empowerment Specialist, National Disability Institute; and Juliana Crist, Director, Ohio STABLE Accounts, Office of the State Treasurer. Each speaker highlighted their own and/or organization's work to help Americans with disabilities build a more financially secure and independent life. During the morning session, Summit attendees formed working groups to identify pathways to create better economic futures for all individuals with disabilities. The goal was to develop and refine strategies to fulfill the promise of the Americans with Disabilities Act "to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities." Following an afternoon break, the working groups gave their reports and recommendations to advance financial inclusion for Americans with disabilities. As part of the day's program, a proclamation from Columbus Mayor Ginther was presented by Mr. Isbell, from the Office of the Mayor, announcing November 16, 2016 as Economic Empowerment Day. A welcome video from Mayor Ginther kicked off the event. Visit the Columbus Financial Inclusion Summit webpage for more information. Photographs of the event are available upon request. The Financial Inclusion Summit was made possible through lead funding from JPMorgan Chase. About National Disability Institute National Disability Institute (NDI) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. The first national organization committed exclusively to championing economic empowerment, financial education, asset development and financial stability for all persons with disabilities, NDI affects change through public education, policy development, training, technical assistance and innovative initiatives. NDI and its Real Economic Impact (REI) Network have helped more than 2.3 million people with disabilities receive nearly $2.3 billion in tax refunds and credits. To learn more, visit www.realeconomicimpact.org. Engage with NDI on Facebook:RealEconImpact or follow NDI on Twitter:@RealEconImpact.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, National Disability Institute (NDI) assembled policymakers, stakeholders and thought leaders at the Ohio Union in Columbus, Ohio for a first of its kind Financial Inclusion Summit. The Summit addressed the financial knowledge and skill gaps of Americans with disabilities and the barriers that prevent their full participation in the economic mainstream. "Twenty-six years after the signing into law of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there remain persistent barriers to economic self-sufficiency for people with disabilities," Michael Morris, Executive Director, National Disability Institute, said. "We must make it a priority in this country to connect leaders from both the disability community and financial services sector, as well as policy makers, employers, regulators, self-advocates and family members to design the next generation of collective efforts to fulfill the ADA's promise of economic self-sufficiency. Equal opportunity must include options to build the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed financial decisions, access to financial education and coaching, affordable and accessible financial services and products, inclusion in career pathways and the ability to save and build assets." Said Mayor Andrew J. Ginther, "We are incredibly honored to be hosting a Summit that addresses such an important issue: assuring people with disabilities have access to mainstream financial services." Collaborating organizations for the event included Apprisen, City of Columbus, Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, Disability Rights Ohio, Goodwill Columbus, Ohio Bankers League, Ohio Office of the Treasurer, Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council, STABLE Account and Columbus Urban League. As the nation's first nonprofit dedicated exclusively to improving the financial health and future of all people across the spectrum of disability, NDI has long documented the unique financial challenges and hurdles individuals with disabilities face. Two NDI reports, The Financial Capability of Adults with Disabilities and The Banking Status and Financial Behaviors of Adults with Disabilities, provided critical data and research which served as catalysts for today's presentation and group discussions. Findings from the reports include:    81 percent of people with disabilities did not have an emergency fund to cover three months of expenses, as compared to 54 percent of people without disabilities;     70 percent of people with disabilities responded they could not come up with $2,000 in an emergency, as compared to 37 percent of people without disabilities;     Only 18 percent of people with disabilities had determined their retirement savings needs, as compared to 41 percent of people without disabilities;     Among households headed by working-age persons with disability, nearly one-fifth were unbanked (18 percent) and more than one-fourth were underbanked (28 percent); and     Households headed by working-age persons with disability were significantly less likely to have a savings account compared to households headed by those without disability. (47 percent vs. 72 percent, respectively). The overflow crowd at the Summit heard from a diverse set of speakers representing both public and private interests and the nonprofit sector. Special guests included: Amy Furash, Executive Director, Business Operations, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Richard Isbell, ADA Coordinator, Office of the Mayor; Courtney Mullin, Project Manager, Ohio DB 101, Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, Employment First; Brandy Avery, Director of Financial Empowerment Services, Columbus Urban League; Stephanie Hoffer, Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law; Katie Frederick, Executive Director, American Council of the Blind of Ohio; Alice Coday, Financial Empowerment Specialist, National Disability Institute; and Juliana Crist, Director, Ohio STABLE Accounts, Office of the State Treasurer. Each speaker highlighted their own and/or organization's work to help Americans with disabilities build a more financially secure and independent life. During the morning session, Summit attendees formed working groups to identify pathways to create better economic futures for all individuals with disabilities. The goal was to develop and refine strategies to fulfill the promise of the Americans with Disabilities Act "to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities." Following an afternoon break, the working groups gave their reports and recommendations to advance financial inclusion for Americans with disabilities. As part of the day's program, a proclamation from Columbus Mayor Ginther was presented by Mr. Isbell, from the Office of the Mayor, announcing November 16, 2016 as Economic Empowerment Day. A welcome video from Mayor Ginther kicked off the event. Visit the Columbus Financial Inclusion Summit webpage for more information. Photographs of the event are available upon request. The Financial Inclusion Summit was made possible through lead funding from JPMorgan Chase. About National Disability Institute National Disability Institute (NDI) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. The first national organization committed exclusively to championing economic empowerment, financial education, asset development and financial stability for all persons with disabilities, NDI affects change through public education, policy development, training, technical assistance and innovative initiatives. NDI and its Real Economic Impact (REI) Network have helped more than 2.3 million people with disabilities receive nearly $2.3 billion in tax refunds and credits. To learn more, visit www.realeconomicimpact.org. Engage with NDI on Facebook:RealEconImpact or follow NDI on Twitter:@RealEconImpact.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, National Disability Institute (NDI) assembled policymakers, stakeholders and thought leaders at the Ohio Union in Columbus, Ohio for a first of its kind Financial Inclusion Summit. The Summit addressed the financial knowledge and skill gaps of Americans with disabilities and the barriers that prevent their full participation in the economic mainstream. "Twenty-six years after the signing into law of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there remain persistent barriers to economic self-sufficiency for people with disabilities," Michael Morris, Executive Director, National Disability Institute, said. "We must make it a priority in this country to connect leaders from both the disability community and financial services sector, as well as policy makers, employers, regulators, self-advocates and family members to design the next generation of collective efforts to fulfill the ADA's promise of economic self-sufficiency. Equal opportunity must include options to build the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed financial decisions, access to financial education and coaching, affordable and accessible financial services and products, inclusion in career pathways and the ability to save and build assets." Said Mayor Andrew J. Ginther, "We are incredibly honored to be hosting a Summit that addresses such an important issue: assuring people with disabilities have access to mainstream financial services." Collaborating organizations for the event included Apprisen, City of Columbus, Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, Disability Rights Ohio, Goodwill Columbus, Ohio Bankers League, Ohio Office of the Treasurer, Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council, STABLE Account and Columbus Urban League. As the nation's first nonprofit dedicated exclusively to improving the financial health and future of all people across the spectrum of disability, NDI has long documented the unique financial challenges and hurdles individuals with disabilities face. Two NDI reports, The Financial Capability of Adults with Disabilities and The Banking Status and Financial Behaviors of Adults with Disabilities, provided critical data and research which served as catalysts for today's presentation and group discussions. Findings from the reports include:    81 percent of people with disabilities did not have an emergency fund to cover three months of expenses, as compared to 54 percent of people without disabilities;     70 percent of people with disabilities responded they could not come up with $2,000 in an emergency, as compared to 37 percent of people without disabilities;     Only 18 percent of people with disabilities had determined their retirement savings needs, as compared to 41 percent of people without disabilities;     Among households headed by working-age persons with disability, nearly one-fifth were unbanked (18 percent) and more than one-fourth were underbanked (28 percent); and     Households headed by working-age persons with disability were significantly less likely to have a savings account compared to households headed by those without disability. (47 percent vs. 72 percent, respectively). The overflow crowd at the Summit heard from a diverse set of speakers representing both public and private interests and the nonprofit sector. Special guests included: Amy Furash, Executive Director, Business Operations, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Richard Isbell, ADA Coordinator, Office of the Mayor; Courtney Mullin, Project Manager, Ohio DB 101, Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, Employment First; Brandy Avery, Director of Financial Empowerment Services, Columbus Urban League; Stephanie Hoffer, Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law; Katie Frederick, Executive Director, American Council of the Blind of Ohio; Alice Coday, Financial Empowerment Specialist, National Disability Institute; and Juliana Crist, Director, Ohio STABLE Accounts, Office of the State Treasurer. Each speaker highlighted their own and/or organization's work to help Americans with disabilities build a more financially secure and independent life. During the morning session, Summit attendees formed working groups to identify pathways to create better economic futures for all individuals with disabilities. The goal was to develop and refine strategies to fulfill the promise of the Americans with Disabilities Act "to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities." Following an afternoon break, the working groups gave their reports and recommendations to advance financial inclusion for Americans with disabilities. As part of the day's program, a proclamation from Columbus Mayor Ginther was presented by Mr. Isbell, from the Office of the Mayor, announcing November 16, 2016 as Economic Empowerment Day. A welcome video from Mayor Ginther kicked off the event. Visit the Columbus Financial Inclusion Summit webpage for more information. Photographs of the event are available upon request. The Financial Inclusion Summit was made possible through lead funding from JPMorgan Chase. About National Disability Institute National Disability Institute (NDI) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. The first national organization committed exclusively to championing economic empowerment, financial education, asset development and financial stability for all persons with disabilities, NDI affects change through public education, policy development, training, technical assistance and innovative initiatives. NDI and its Real Economic Impact (REI) Network have helped more than 2.3 million people with disabilities receive nearly $2.3 billion in tax refunds and credits. To learn more, visit www.realeconomicimpact.org. Engage with NDI on Facebook:RealEconImpact or follow NDI on Twitter:@RealEconImpact.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, National Disability Institute (NDI) assembled policymakers, stakeholders and thought leaders at the Ohio Union in Columbus, Ohio for a first of its kind Financial Inclusion Summit. The Summit addressed the financial knowledge and skill gaps of Americans with disabilities and the barriers that prevent their full participation in the economic mainstream. "Twenty-six years after the signing into law of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there remain persistent barriers to economic self-sufficiency for people with disabilities," Michael Morris, Executive Director, National Disability Institute, said. "We must make it a priority in this country to connect leaders from both the disability community and financial services sector, as well as policy makers, employers, regulators, self-advocates and family members to design the next generation of collective efforts to fulfill the ADA's promise of economic self-sufficiency. Equal opportunity must include options to build the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed financial decisions, access to financial education and coaching, affordable and accessible financial services and products, inclusion in career pathways and the ability to save and build assets." Said Mayor Andrew J. Ginther, "We are incredibly honored to be hosting a Summit that addresses such an important issue: assuring people with disabilities have access to mainstream financial services." Collaborating organizations for the event included Apprisen, City of Columbus, Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, Disability Rights Ohio, Goodwill Columbus, Ohio Bankers League, Ohio Office of the Treasurer, Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council, STABLE Account and Columbus Urban League. As the nation's first nonprofit dedicated exclusively to improving the financial health and future of all people across the spectrum of disability, NDI has long documented the unique financial challenges and hurdles individuals with disabilities face. Two NDI reports, The Financial Capability of Adults with Disabilities and The Banking Status and Financial Behaviors of Adults with Disabilities, provided critical data and research which served as catalysts for today's presentation and group discussions. Findings from the reports include:    81 percent of people with disabilities did not have an emergency fund to cover three months of expenses, as compared to 54 percent of people without disabilities;     70 percent of people with disabilities responded they could not come up with $2,000 in an emergency, as compared to 37 percent of people without disabilities;     Only 18 percent of people with disabilities had determined their retirement savings needs, as compared to 41 percent of people without disabilities;     Among households headed by working-age persons with disability, nearly one-fifth were unbanked (18 percent) and more than one-fourth were underbanked (28 percent); and     Households headed by working-age persons with disability were significantly less likely to have a savings account compared to households headed by those without disability. (47 percent vs. 72 percent, respectively). The overflow crowd at the Summit heard from a diverse set of speakers representing both public and private interests and the nonprofit sector. Special guests included: Amy Furash, Executive Director, Business Operations, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Richard Isbell, ADA Coordinator, Office of the Mayor; Courtney Mullin, Project Manager, Ohio DB 101, Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, Employment First; Brandy Avery, Director of Financial Empowerment Services, Columbus Urban League; Stephanie Hoffer, Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law; Katie Frederick, Executive Director, American Council of the Blind of Ohio; Alice Coday, Financial Empowerment Specialist, National Disability Institute; and Juliana Crist, Director, Ohio STABLE Accounts, Office of the State Treasurer. Each speaker highlighted their own and/or organization's work to help Americans with disabilities build a more financially secure and independent life. During the morning session, Summit attendees formed working groups to identify pathways to create better economic futures for all individuals with disabilities. The goal was to develop and refine strategies to fulfill the promise of the Americans with Disabilities Act "to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities." Following an afternoon break, the working groups gave their reports and recommendations to advance financial inclusion for Americans with disabilities. As part of the day's program, a proclamation from Columbus Mayor Ginther was presented by Mr. Isbell, from the Office of the Mayor, announcing November 16, 2016 as Economic Empowerment Day. A welcome video from Mayor Ginther kicked off the event. Visit the Columbus Financial Inclusion Summit webpage for more information. Photographs of the event are available upon request. The Financial Inclusion Summit was made possible through lead funding from JPMorgan Chase. About National Disability Institute National Disability Institute (NDI) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. The first national organization committed exclusively to championing economic empowerment, financial education, asset development and financial stability for all persons with disabilities, NDI affects change through public education, policy development, training, technical assistance and innovative initiatives. NDI and its Real Economic Impact (REI) Network have helped more than 2.3 million people with disabilities receive nearly $2.3 billion in tax refunds and credits. To learn more, visit www.realeconomicimpact.org. Engage with NDI on Facebook:RealEconImpact or follow NDI on Twitter:@RealEconImpact.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, National Disability Institute (NDI) assembled policymakers, stakeholders and thought leaders at the Ohio Union in Columbus, Ohio for a first of its kind Financial Inclusion Summit. The Summit addressed the financial knowledge and skill gaps of Americans with disabilities and the barriers that prevent their full participation in the economic mainstream. "Twenty-six years after the signing into law of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there remain persistent barriers to economic self-sufficiency for people with disabilities," Michael Morris, Executive Director, National Disability Institute, said. "We must make it a priority in this country to connect leaders from both the disability community and financial services sector, as well as policy makers, employers, regulators, self-advocates and family members to design the next generation of collective efforts to fulfill the ADA's promise of economic self-sufficiency. Equal opportunity must include options to build the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed financial decisions, access to financial education and coaching, affordable and accessible financial services and products, inclusion in career pathways and the ability to save and build assets." Said Mayor Andrew J. Ginther, "We are incredibly honored to be hosting a Summit that addresses such an important issue: assuring people with disabilities have access to mainstream financial services." Collaborating organizations for the event included Apprisen, City of Columbus, Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, Disability Rights Ohio, Goodwill Columbus, Ohio Bankers League, Ohio Office of the Treasurer, Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council, STABLE Account and Columbus Urban League. As the nation's first nonprofit dedicated exclusively to improving the financial health and future of all people across the spectrum of disability, NDI has long documented the unique financial challenges and hurdles individuals with disabilities face. Two NDI reports, The Financial Capability of Adults with Disabilities and The Banking Status and Financial Behaviors of Adults with Disabilities, provided critical data and research which served as catalysts for today's presentation and group discussions. Findings from the reports include:    81 percent of people with disabilities did not have an emergency fund to cover three months of expenses, as compared to 54 percent of people without disabilities;     70 percent of people with disabilities responded they could not come up with $2,000 in an emergency, as compared to 37 percent of people without disabilities;     Only 18 percent of people with disabilities had determined their retirement savings needs, as compared to 41 percent of people without disabilities;     Among households headed by working-age persons with disability, nearly one-fifth were unbanked (18 percent) and more than one-fourth were underbanked (28 percent); and     Households headed by working-age persons with disability were significantly less likely to have a savings account compared to households headed by those without disability. (47 percent vs. 72 percent, respectively). The overflow crowd at the Summit heard from a diverse set of speakers representing both public and private interests and the nonprofit sector. Special guests included: Amy Furash, Executive Director, Business Operations, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Richard Isbell, ADA Coordinator, Office of the Mayor; Courtney Mullin, Project Manager, Ohio DB 101, Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, Employment First; Brandy Avery, Director of Financial Empowerment Services, Columbus Urban League; Stephanie Hoffer, Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law; Katie Frederick, Executive Director, American Council of the Blind of Ohio; Alice Coday, Financial Empowerment Specialist, National Disability Institute; and Juliana Crist, Director, Ohio STABLE Accounts, Office of the State Treasurer. Each speaker highlighted their own and/or organization's work to help Americans with disabilities build a more financially secure and independent life. During the morning session, Summit attendees formed working groups to identify pathways to create better economic futures for all individuals with disabilities. The goal was to develop and refine strategies to fulfill the promise of the Americans with Disabilities Act "to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities." Following an afternoon break, the working groups gave their reports and recommendations to advance financial inclusion for Americans with disabilities. As part of the day's program, a proclamation from Columbus Mayor Ginther was presented by Mr. Isbell, from the Office of the Mayor, announcing November 16, 2016 as Economic Empowerment Day. A welcome video from Mayor Ginther kicked off the event. Visit the Columbus Financial Inclusion Summit webpage for more information. Photographs of the event are available upon request. The Financial Inclusion Summit was made possible through lead funding from JPMorgan Chase. About National Disability Institute National Disability Institute (NDI) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. The first national organization committed exclusively to championing economic empowerment, financial education, asset development and financial stability for all persons with disabilities, NDI affects change through public education, policy development, training, technical assistance and innovative initiatives. NDI and its Real Economic Impact (REI) Network have helped more than 2.3 million people with disabilities receive nearly $2.3 billion in tax refunds and credits. To learn more, visit www.realeconomicimpact.org. Engage with NDI on Facebook:RealEconImpact or follow NDI on Twitter:@RealEconImpact.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, National Disability Institute (NDI) assembled policymakers, stakeholders and thought leaders at the Ohio Union in Columbus, Ohio for a first of its kind Financial Inclusion Summit. The Summit addressed the financial knowledge and skill gaps of Americans with disabilities and the barriers that prevent their full participation in the economic mainstream. "Twenty-six years after the signing into law of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there remain persistent barriers to economic self-sufficiency for people with disabilities," Michael Morris, Executive Director, National Disability Institute, said. "We must make it a priority in this country to connect leaders from both the disability community and financial services sector, as well as policy makers, employers, regulators, self-advocates and family members to design the next generation of collective efforts to fulfill the ADA's promise of economic self-sufficiency. Equal opportunity must include options to build the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed financial decisions, access to financial education and coaching, affordable and accessible financial services and products, inclusion in career pathways and the ability to save and build assets." Said Mayor Andrew J. Ginther, "We are incredibly honored to be hosting a Summit that addresses such an important issue: assuring people with disabilities have access to mainstream financial services." Collaborating organizations for the event included Apprisen, City of Columbus, Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, Disability Rights Ohio, Goodwill Columbus, Ohio Bankers League, Ohio Office of the Treasurer, Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council, STABLE Account and Columbus Urban League. As the nation's first nonprofit dedicated exclusively to improving the financial health and future of all people across the spectrum of disability, NDI has long documented the unique financial challenges and hurdles individuals with disabilities face. Two NDI reports, The Financial Capability of Adults with Disabilities and The Banking Status and Financial Behaviors of Adults with Disabilities, provided critical data and research which served as catalysts for today's presentation and group discussions. Findings from the reports include:    81 percent of people with disabilities did not have an emergency fund to cover three months of expenses, as compared to 54 percent of people without disabilities;     70 percent of people with disabilities responded they could not come up with $2,000 in an emergency, as compared to 37 percent of people without disabilities;     Only 18 percent of people with disabilities had determined their retirement savings needs, as compared to 41 percent of people without disabilities;     Among households headed by working-age persons with disability, nearly one-fifth were unbanked (18 percent) and more than one-fourth were underbanked (28 percent); and     Households headed by working-age persons with disability were significantly less likely to have a savings account compared to households headed by those without disability. (47 percent vs. 72 percent, respectively). The overflow crowd at the Summit heard from a diverse set of speakers representing both public and private interests and the nonprofit sector. Special guests included: Amy Furash, Executive Director, Business Operations, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Richard Isbell, ADA Coordinator, Office of the Mayor; Courtney Mullin, Project Manager, Ohio DB 101, Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, Employment First; Brandy Avery, Director of Financial Empowerment Services, Columbus Urban League; Stephanie Hoffer, Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law; Katie Frederick, Executive Director, American Council of the Blind of Ohio; Alice Coday, Financial Empowerment Specialist, National Disability Institute; and Juliana Crist, Director, Ohio STABLE Accounts, Office of the State Treasurer. Each speaker highlighted their own and/or organization's work to help Americans with disabilities build a more financially secure and independent life. During the morning session, Summit attendees formed working groups to identify pathways to create better economic futures for all individuals with disabilities. The goal was to develop and refine strategies to fulfill the promise of the Americans with Disabilities Act "to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities." Following an afternoon break, the working groups gave their reports and recommendations to advance financial inclusion for Americans with disabilities. As part of the day's program, a proclamation from Columbus Mayor Ginther was presented by Mr. Isbell, from the Office of the Mayor, announcing November 16, 2016 as Economic Empowerment Day. A welcome video from Mayor Ginther kicked off the event. Visit the Columbus Financial Inclusion Summit webpage for more information. Photographs of the event are available upon request. The Financial Inclusion Summit was made possible through lead funding from JPMorgan Chase. About National Disability Institute National Disability Institute (NDI) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. The first national organization committed exclusively to championing economic empowerment, financial education, asset development and financial stability for all persons with disabilities, NDI affects change through public education, policy development, training, technical assistance and innovative initiatives. NDI and its Real Economic Impact (REI) Network have helped more than 2.3 million people with disabilities receive nearly $2.3 billion in tax refunds and credits. To learn more, visit www.realeconomicimpact.org. Engage with NDI on Facebook:RealEconImpact or follow NDI on Twitter:@RealEconImpact.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, National Disability Institute (NDI) assembled policymakers, stakeholders and thought leaders at the Ohio Union in Columbus, Ohio for a first of its kind Financial Inclusion Summit. The Summit addressed the financial knowledge and skill gaps of Americans with disabilities and the barriers that prevent their full participation in the economic mainstream. "Twenty-six years after the signing into law of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), there remain persistent barriers to economic self-sufficiency for people with disabilities," Michael Morris, Executive Director, National Disability Institute, said. "We must make it a priority in this country to connect leaders from both the disability community and financial services sector, as well as policy makers, employers, regulators, self-advocates and family members to design the next generation of collective efforts to fulfill the ADA's promise of economic self-sufficiency. Equal opportunity must include options to build the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed financial decisions, access to financial education and coaching, affordable and accessible financial services and products, inclusion in career pathways and the ability to save and build assets." Said Mayor Andrew J. Ginther, "We are incredibly honored to be hosting a Summit that addresses such an important issue: assuring people with disabilities have access to mainstream financial services." Collaborating organizations for the event included Apprisen, City of Columbus, Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, Disability Rights Ohio, Goodwill Columbus, Ohio Bankers League, Ohio Office of the Treasurer, Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council, STABLE Account and Columbus Urban League. As the nation's first nonprofit dedicated exclusively to improving the financial health and future of all people across the spectrum of disability, NDI has long documented the unique financial challenges and hurdles individuals with disabilities face. Two NDI reports, The Financial Capability of Adults with Disabilities and The Banking Status and Financial Behaviors of Adults with Disabilities, provided critical data and research which served as catalysts for today's presentation and group discussions. Findings from the reports include:    81 percent of people with disabilities did not have an emergency fund to cover three months of expenses, as compared to 54 percent of people without disabilities;     70 percent of people with disabilities responded they could not come up with $2,000 in an emergency, as compared to 37 percent of people without disabilities;     Only 18 percent of people with disabilities had determined their retirement savings needs, as compared to 41 percent of people without disabilities;     Among households headed by working-age persons with disability, nearly one-fifth were unbanked (18 percent) and more than one-fourth were underbanked (28 percent); and     Households headed by working-age persons with disability were significantly less likely to have a savings account compared to households headed by those without disability. (47 percent vs. 72 percent, respectively). The overflow crowd at the Summit heard from a diverse set of speakers representing both public and private interests and the nonprofit sector. Special guests included: Amy Furash, Executive Director, Business Operations, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Richard Isbell, ADA Coordinator, Office of the Mayor; Courtney Mullin, Project Manager, Ohio DB 101, Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, Employment First; Brandy Avery, Director of Financial Empowerment Services, Columbus Urban League; Stephanie Hoffer, Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law; Katie Frederick, Executive Director, American Council of the Blind of Ohio; Alice Coday, Financial Empowerment Specialist, National Disability Institute; and Juliana Crist, Director, Ohio STABLE Accounts, Office of the State Treasurer. Each speaker highlighted their own and/or organization's work to help Americans with disabilities build a more financially secure and independent life. During the morning session, Summit attendees formed working groups to identify pathways to create better economic futures for all individuals with disabilities. The goal was to develop and refine strategies to fulfill the promise of the Americans with Disabilities Act "to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities." Following an afternoon break, the working groups gave their reports and recommendations to advance financial inclusion for Americans with disabilities. As part of the day's program, a proclamation from Columbus Mayor Ginther was presented by Mr. Isbell, from the Office of the Mayor, announcing November 16, 2016 as Economic Empowerment Day. A welcome video from Mayor Ginther kicked off the event. Visit the Columbus Financial Inclusion Summit webpage for more information. Photographs of the event are available upon request. The Financial Inclusion Summit was made possible through lead funding from JPMorgan Chase. About National Disability Institute National Disability Institute (NDI) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to building a better economic future for people with disabilities. The first national organization committed exclusively to championing economic empowerment, financial education, asset development and financial stability for all persons with disabilities, NDI affects change through public education, policy development, training, technical assistance and innovative initiatives. NDI and its Real Economic Impact (REI) Network have helped more than 2.3 million people with disabilities receive nearly $2.3 billion in tax refunds and credits. To learn more, visit www.realeconomicimpact.org. Engage with NDI on Facebook:RealEconImpact or follow NDI on Twitter:@RealEconImpact.


MARTINSRIED / MUNICH, Germany, Dec. 06, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- MorphoSys AG (FSE: MOR; Prime Standard Segment, TecDAX; OTC: MPSYY) announced today the presentation of updated safety and efficacy data from two ongoing phase 2 clinical studies evaluating MOR208, an Fc-modified investigational antibody targeting CD19, in patients with advanced B-cell malignancies, at the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in San Diego, California/USA. Continued long-lasting responses of more than 26 months reported in patients with relapsed/refractory NHL in a phase 2a trial with MOR208 monotherapy An oral presentation reported data from a phase 2a study evaluating single-agent MOR208 in 92 patients with various subtypes of relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and other indolent NHL (iNHL). Results were consistent with prior updates from the study, reflecting in particular a continuation of long-lasting responses of more than 26 months. "Patients with NHL, who are refractory or show relapse after previous anti-CD20-based therapies, have limited treatment alternatives and usually a very poor prognosis. These updated results illustrate our ongoing efforts to develop MOR208 as a potential new CD19-based antibody therapy for patients suffering from B-cell malignancies, including DLBCL, in phase 2 studies in combination with other cancer drugs," said Dr. Arndt Schottelius, Chief Development Officer of MorphoSys AG. At the last cutoff date, June 3, 2016, three patients with DLBCL and six with iNHL were in remission and on study treatment, with the longest responses in both subgroups ongoing for more than 26 months. Of these nine patients, seven showed complete responses and 2 experienced partial responses. The median duration of response was 20.1 months for DLBCL and not yet reached for iNHL. The overall response rate (ORR), based on complete responses (CR) and partial responses (PR), was 36% in the DLBCL subgroup and 33% in iNHL patients (both based on evaluable patients). Based on all patients with DLBCL and iNHL in the study, the ORR was 26% and 29%, respectively. The progression free survival (PFS) rate at 12 months was 39% in both subgroups. In addition to the patients with an objective response (PR or CR), the majority of patients with stable disease (SD) (5/6 DLBCL and 14/17 iNHL) had a reduction in target lesion size (central assessment). PFS was similar in patients with rituximab non-refractory versus rituximab refractory tumors. Fifty-two patients (57%) in the study were classified as having rituximab refractory disease. Of those, five of 24 patients (21%) with DLBCL and five of 22 patients (23%) with iNHL responded to MOR208. Of the 10 responders with rituximab refractory disease, six had a response duration longer than 10 months, two of which lasted for more than 26 months. The most common adverse events were infusion-related reactions (IRRs) occurring in 12% of the patients (11% of grade 1 or 2, 1% of grade 4) and neutropenia occurring in 12% of patients (3% of grade 1 or 2, 9% of grade 3 or higher). No treatment-related deaths were reported. Number and title of the presentation Abstract #623 Jurczak et al: Single-Agent MOR208 in Relapsed or Refractory (R-R) Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL): Results from Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) and Indolent NHL Subgroups of a Phase IIa Study Combination of MOR208 with lenalidomide and ibrutinib in CLL from phase 2 investigator-initiated trial A second presentation is a poster from investigators at The Ohio State University, who reported on an investigator-initiated trial (IIT) evaluating MOR208 in combination with lenalidomide in three cohorts of patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL): previously untreated CLL patients, relapsed/refractory CLL patients; and patients with Richter's Transformation. The trial also included a 4th cohort of ibrutinib-treated CLL patients with identified resistance mutations to ibrutinib in the tumors (molecular relapse) but no confirmed clinical relapse where MOR208 was added to ibrutinib therapy. Recent data have generally shown poor clinical outcomes in patients who relapse after a therapy with the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib and whose leukemia cells carry a mutation in the BTK gene prior to relapse. According to the data presented, 34 patients have been enrolled in the study so far, 27 receiving MOR208 in combination with lenalidomide (11 of which in the previously untreated cohort, 11 in the relapsed/refractory cohort, 5 in the Richter's Transformation cohort) and 7 receiving MOR208 plus ibrutinib, with patient accrual still ongoing. Most frequent hematological adverse event over all cohorts were thrombocytopenia in 47% of patients (9% grade 3 or higher) and neutropenia in 35% (21% grade 3 or higher). There were no unexpected serious adverse events reported. According to the abstract, in the group of CLL patients with ibrutinib-resistant cells receiving MOR208 in addition to ibrutinib, four out of seven patients have been on study for at least 3 cycles of 28 days each already, and no patient had developed progressive disease at the time of abstract data cut-off. Preliminary activity has been seen in all cohorts, including ibrutinib-resistant CLL patients. "There is a high unmet medical need for CLL patients, especially those showing resistance to ibrutinib therapy," said Dr. Jennifer Woyach, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at Ohio State University. "Therefore we added an additional cohort to our ongoing CLL study to evaluate MOR208 in combination with ibrutinib in order to investigate whether MOR208 could be a promising combination partner in this setting. We are looking forward to the continuation of the trial and to present further results going forward." Number and title of the presentation Abstract #4386 Woyach et al: Updated Results from a Phase II Study of the Fc Engineered CD19 Antibody MOR208 in Combination with Lenalidomide for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Richter's Transformation or Ibrutinib for Patients with Ibrutinib-Resistant Clones MorphoSys held an Investor & Analyst Event at the 2016 ASH Annual Meeting on December 5, 2016, at 8:00pm PST (December 6, 2016: 4:00am GMT, 5:00am CET). Two clinical investigators presented clinical data for MorphoSys's investigational agents MOR208 and MOR202. A replay and the presentation will be made available at http://www.morphosys.com. Webcast: https://www.webcaster4.com/Webcast/Page/359/18722 About MorphoSys: MorphoSys developed HuCAL, the most successful antibody library technology in the pharmaceutical industry. By successfully applying this and other patented technologies, MorphoSys has become a leader in the field of therapeutic antibodies, one of the fastest-growing drug classes in human healthcare. Together with its pharmaceutical partners, MorphoSys has built a therapeutic pipeline of more than 100 human antibody drug candidates for the treatment of cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease, to name just a few. With its ongoing commitment to new antibody technology and drug development, MorphoSys is focused on making the healthcare products of tomorrow. MorphoSys is listed on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange under the symbol MOR. For regular updates about MorphoSys, visit http://www.morphosys.com. HuCAL®, HuCAL GOLD®, HuCAL PLATINUM®, CysDisplay®, RapMAT®, arYla®, Ylanthia®, 100 billion high potentials®, Slonomics®, Lanthio Pharma® and LanthioPep® are registered trademarks of the MorphoSys Group. This communication contains certain forward-looking statements concerning the MorphoSys group of companies, The forward-looking statements contained herein represent the judgment of MorphoSys as of the date of this release and involve risks and uncertainties. Should actual conditions differ from the Company's assumptions, actual results and actions may differ from those anticipated, MorphoSys does not intend to update any of these forward-looking statements as far as the wording of the relevant press release is concerned. For more information, please contact: MorphoSys AG Anke Linnartz Head of Corporate Communications & IR


MARTINSRIED / MUNICH, Germany, Dec. 06, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- MorphoSys AG (FSE: MOR; Prime Standard Segment, TecDAX; OTC: MPSYY) announced today the presentation of updated safety and efficacy data from two ongoing phase 2 clinical studies evaluating MOR208, an Fc-modified investigational antibody targeting CD19, in patients with advanced B-cell malignancies, at the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in San Diego, California/USA. Continued long-lasting responses of more than 26 months reported in patients with relapsed/refractory NHL in a phase 2a trial with MOR208 monotherapy An oral presentation reported data from a phase 2a study evaluating single-agent MOR208 in 92 patients with various subtypes of relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and other indolent NHL (iNHL). Results were consistent with prior updates from the study, reflecting in particular a continuation of long-lasting responses of more than 26 months. "Patients with NHL, who are refractory or show relapse after previous anti-CD20-based therapies, have limited treatment alternatives and usually a very poor prognosis. These updated results illustrate our ongoing efforts to develop MOR208 as a potential new CD19-based antibody therapy for patients suffering from B-cell malignancies, including DLBCL, in phase 2 studies in combination with other cancer drugs," said Dr. Arndt Schottelius, Chief Development Officer of MorphoSys AG. At the last cutoff date, June 3, 2016, three patients with DLBCL and six with iNHL were in remission and on study treatment, with the longest responses in both subgroups ongoing for more than 26 months. Of these nine patients, seven showed complete responses and 2 experienced partial responses. The median duration of response was 20.1 months for DLBCL and not yet reached for iNHL. The overall response rate (ORR), based on complete responses (CR) and partial responses (PR), was 36% in the DLBCL subgroup and 33% in iNHL patients (both based on evaluable patients). Based on all patients with DLBCL and iNHL in the study, the ORR was 26% and 29%, respectively. The progression free survival (PFS) rate at 12 months was 39% in both subgroups. In addition to the patients with an objective response (PR or CR), the majority of patients with stable disease (SD) (5/6 DLBCL and 14/17 iNHL) had a reduction in target lesion size (central assessment). PFS was similar in patients with rituximab non-refractory versus rituximab refractory tumors. Fifty-two patients (57%) in the study were classified as having rituximab refractory disease. Of those, five of 24 patients (21%) with DLBCL and five of 22 patients (23%) with iNHL responded to MOR208. Of the 10 responders with rituximab refractory disease, six had a response duration longer than 10 months, two of which lasted for more than 26 months. The most common adverse events were infusion-related reactions (IRRs) occurring in 12% of the patients (11% of grade 1 or 2, 1% of grade 4) and neutropenia occurring in 12% of patients (3% of grade 1 or 2, 9% of grade 3 or higher). No treatment-related deaths were reported. Number and title of the presentation Abstract #623 Jurczak et al: Single-Agent MOR208 in Relapsed or Refractory (R-R) Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL): Results from Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) and Indolent NHL Subgroups of a Phase IIa Study Combination of MOR208 with lenalidomide and ibrutinib in CLL from phase 2 investigator-initiated trial A second presentation is a poster from investigators at The Ohio State University, who reported on an investigator-initiated trial (IIT) evaluating MOR208 in combination with lenalidomide in three cohorts of patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL): previously untreated CLL patients, relapsed/refractory CLL patients; and patients with Richter's Transformation. The trial also included a 4th cohort of ibrutinib-treated CLL patients with identified resistance mutations to ibrutinib in the tumors (molecular relapse) but no confirmed clinical relapse where MOR208 was added to ibrutinib therapy. Recent data have generally shown poor clinical outcomes in patients who relapse after a therapy with the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib and whose leukemia cells carry a mutation in the BTK gene prior to relapse. According to the data presented, 34 patients have been enrolled in the study so far, 27 receiving MOR208 in combination with lenalidomide (11 of which in the previously untreated cohort, 11 in the relapsed/refractory cohort, 5 in the Richter's Transformation cohort) and 7 receiving MOR208 plus ibrutinib, with patient accrual still ongoing. Most frequent hematological adverse event over all cohorts were thrombocytopenia in 47% of patients (9% grade 3 or higher) and neutropenia in 35% (21% grade 3 or higher). There were no unexpected serious adverse events reported. According to the abstract, in the group of CLL patients with ibrutinib-resistant cells receiving MOR208 in addition to ibrutinib, four out of seven patients have been on study for at least 3 cycles of 28 days each already, and no patient had developed progressive disease at the time of abstract data cut-off. Preliminary activity has been seen in all cohorts, including ibrutinib-resistant CLL patients. "There is a high unmet medical need for CLL patients, especially those showing resistance to ibrutinib therapy," said Dr. Jennifer Woyach, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at Ohio State University. "Therefore we added an additional cohort to our ongoing CLL study to evaluate MOR208 in combination with ibrutinib in order to investigate whether MOR208 could be a promising combination partner in this setting. We are looking forward to the continuation of the trial and to present further results going forward." Number and title of the presentation Abstract #4386 Woyach et al: Updated Results from a Phase II Study of the Fc Engineered CD19 Antibody MOR208 in Combination with Lenalidomide for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Richter's Transformation or Ibrutinib for Patients with Ibrutinib-Resistant Clones MorphoSys held an Investor & Analyst Event at the 2016 ASH Annual Meeting on December 5, 2016, at 8:00pm PST (December 6, 2016: 4:00am GMT, 5:00am CET). Two clinical investigators presented clinical data for MorphoSys's investigational agents MOR208 and MOR202. A replay and the presentation will be made available at http://www.morphosys.com. Webcast: https://www.webcaster4.com/Webcast/Page/359/18722 About MorphoSys: MorphoSys developed HuCAL, the most successful antibody library technology in the pharmaceutical industry. By successfully applying this and other patented technologies, MorphoSys has become a leader in the field of therapeutic antibodies, one of the fastest-growing drug classes in human healthcare. Together with its pharmaceutical partners, MorphoSys has built a therapeutic pipeline of more than 100 human antibody drug candidates for the treatment of cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease, to name just a few. With its ongoing commitment to new antibody technology and drug development, MorphoSys is focused on making the healthcare products of tomorrow. MorphoSys is listed on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange under the symbol MOR. For regular updates about MorphoSys, visit http://www.morphosys.com. HuCAL®, HuCAL GOLD®, HuCAL PLATINUM®, CysDisplay®, RapMAT®, arYla®, Ylanthia®, 100 billion high potentials®, Slonomics®, Lanthio Pharma® and LanthioPep® are registered trademarks of the MorphoSys Group. This communication contains certain forward-looking statements concerning the MorphoSys group of companies, The forward-looking statements contained herein represent the judgment of MorphoSys as of the date of this release and involve risks and uncertainties. Should actual conditions differ from the Company's assumptions, actual results and actions may differ from those anticipated, MorphoSys does not intend to update any of these forward-looking statements as far as the wording of the relevant press release is concerned. For more information, please contact: MorphoSys AG Anke Linnartz Head of Corporate Communications & IR


MARTINSRIED / MUNICH, Germany, Dec. 06, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- MorphoSys AG (FSE: MOR; Prime Standard Segment, TecDAX; OTC: MPSYY) announced today the presentation of updated safety and efficacy data from two ongoing phase 2 clinical studies evaluating MOR208, an Fc-modified investigational antibody targeting CD19, in patients with advanced B-cell malignancies, at the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in San Diego, California/USA. Continued long-lasting responses of more than 26 months reported in patients with relapsed/refractory NHL in a phase 2a trial with MOR208 monotherapy An oral presentation reported data from a phase 2a study evaluating single-agent MOR208 in 92 patients with various subtypes of relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and other indolent NHL (iNHL). Results were consistent with prior updates from the study, reflecting in particular a continuation of long-lasting responses of more than 26 months. "Patients with NHL, who are refractory or show relapse after previous anti-CD20-based therapies, have limited treatment alternatives and usually a very poor prognosis. These updated results illustrate our ongoing efforts to develop MOR208 as a potential new CD19-based antibody therapy for patients suffering from B-cell malignancies, including DLBCL, in phase 2 studies in combination with other cancer drugs," said Dr. Arndt Schottelius, Chief Development Officer of MorphoSys AG. At the last cutoff date, June 3, 2016, three patients with DLBCL and six with iNHL were in remission and on study treatment, with the longest responses in both subgroups ongoing for more than 26 months. Of these nine patients, seven showed complete responses and 2 experienced partial responses. The median duration of response was 20.1 months for DLBCL and not yet reached for iNHL. The overall response rate (ORR), based on complete responses (CR) and partial responses (PR), was 36% in the DLBCL subgroup and 33% in iNHL patients (both based on evaluable patients). Based on all patients with DLBCL and iNHL in the study, the ORR was 26% and 29%, respectively. The progression free survival (PFS) rate at 12 months was 39% in both subgroups. In addition to the patients with an objective response (PR or CR), the majority of patients with stable disease (SD) (5/6 DLBCL and 14/17 iNHL) had a reduction in target lesion size (central assessment). PFS was similar in patients with rituximab non-refractory versus rituximab refractory tumors. Fifty-two patients (57%) in the study were classified as having rituximab refractory disease. Of those, five of 24 patients (21%) with DLBCL and five of 22 patients (23%) with iNHL responded to MOR208. Of the 10 responders with rituximab refractory disease, six had a response duration longer than 10 months, two of which lasted for more than 26 months. The most common adverse events were infusion-related reactions (IRRs) occurring in 12% of the patients (11% of grade 1 or 2, 1% of grade 4) and neutropenia occurring in 12% of patients (3% of grade 1 or 2, 9% of grade 3 or higher). No treatment-related deaths were reported. Number and title of the presentation Abstract #623 Jurczak et al: Single-Agent MOR208 in Relapsed or Refractory (R-R) Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL): Results from Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) and Indolent NHL Subgroups of a Phase IIa Study Combination of MOR208 with lenalidomide and ibrutinib in CLL from phase 2 investigator-initiated trial A second presentation is a poster from investigators at The Ohio State University, who reported on an investigator-initiated trial (IIT) evaluating MOR208 in combination with lenalidomide in three cohorts of patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL): previously untreated CLL patients, relapsed/refractory CLL patients; and patients with Richter's Transformation. The trial also included a 4th cohort of ibrutinib-treated CLL patients with identified resistance mutations to ibrutinib in the tumors (molecular relapse) but no confirmed clinical relapse where MOR208 was added to ibrutinib therapy. Recent data have generally shown poor clinical outcomes in patients who relapse after a therapy with the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib and whose leukemia cells carry a mutation in the BTK gene prior to relapse. According to the data presented, 34 patients have been enrolled in the study so far, 27 receiving MOR208 in combination with lenalidomide (11 of which in the previously untreated cohort, 11 in the relapsed/refractory cohort, 5 in the Richter's Transformation cohort) and 7 receiving MOR208 plus ibrutinib, with patient accrual still ongoing. Most frequent hematological adverse event over all cohorts were thrombocytopenia in 47% of patients (9% grade 3 or higher) and neutropenia in 35% (21% grade 3 or higher). There were no unexpected serious adverse events reported. According to the abstract, in the group of CLL patients with ibrutinib-resistant cells receiving MOR208 in addition to ibrutinib, four out of seven patients have been on study for at least 3 cycles of 28 days each already, and no patient had developed progressive disease at the time of abstract data cut-off. Preliminary activity has been seen in all cohorts, including ibrutinib-resistant CLL patients. "There is a high unmet medical need for CLL patients, especially those showing resistance to ibrutinib therapy," said Dr. Jennifer Woyach, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at Ohio State University. "Therefore we added an additional cohort to our ongoing CLL study to evaluate MOR208 in combination with ibrutinib in order to investigate whether MOR208 could be a promising combination partner in this setting. We are looking forward to the continuation of the trial and to present further results going forward." Number and title of the presentation Abstract #4386 Woyach et al: Updated Results from a Phase II Study of the Fc Engineered CD19 Antibody MOR208 in Combination with Lenalidomide for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Richter's Transformation or Ibrutinib for Patients with Ibrutinib-Resistant Clones MorphoSys held an Investor & Analyst Event at the 2016 ASH Annual Meeting on December 5, 2016, at 8:00pm PST (December 6, 2016: 4:00am GMT, 5:00am CET). Two clinical investigators presented clinical data for MorphoSys's investigational agents MOR208 and MOR202. A replay and the presentation will be made available at http://www.morphosys.com. Webcast: https://www.webcaster4.com/Webcast/Page/359/18722 About MorphoSys: MorphoSys developed HuCAL, the most successful antibody library technology in the pharmaceutical industry. By successfully applying this and other patented technologies, MorphoSys has become a leader in the field of therapeutic antibodies, one of the fastest-growing drug classes in human healthcare. Together with its pharmaceutical partners, MorphoSys has built a therapeutic pipeline of more than 100 human antibody drug candidates for the treatment of cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease, to name just a few. With its ongoing commitment to new antibody technology and drug development, MorphoSys is focused on making the healthcare products of tomorrow. MorphoSys is listed on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange under the symbol MOR. For regular updates about MorphoSys, visit http://www.morphosys.com. HuCAL®, HuCAL GOLD®, HuCAL PLATINUM®, CysDisplay®, RapMAT®, arYla®, Ylanthia®, 100 billion high potentials®, Slonomics®, Lanthio Pharma® and LanthioPep® are registered trademarks of the MorphoSys Group. This communication contains certain forward-looking statements concerning the MorphoSys group of companies, The forward-looking statements contained herein represent the judgment of MorphoSys as of the date of this release and involve risks and uncertainties. Should actual conditions differ from the Company's assumptions, actual results and actions may differ from those anticipated, MorphoSys does not intend to update any of these forward-looking statements as far as the wording of the relevant press release is concerned. For more information, please contact: MorphoSys AG Anke Linnartz Head of Corporate Communications & IR


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Chris Bires has joined 50 South Capital Advisors as Director of Product Strategy and Investor Relations. In this newly created role, Bires will focus on developing the firm’s full suite of alternatives investment solutions and services, including private equity, hedge fund, private credit, infrastructure, and real asset investments, for both institutional and high net worth investors. “We are pleased to have Chris join our 50 South Capital Advisors team as we continue to grow our assets and investor base,” said Robert Morgan, Managing Director of 50 South Capital Advisors. “Chris will manage our capital raising and lead the continued build-out of distribution channels for 50 South Capital capabilities, while also continuing to further enhance our investor relations efforts with existing clients.” Bires has more than 23 years of experience in investment management, most recently as a director of global distribution at Citadel, responsible for business development and client relationships in North America. Prior to Citadel, he was a managing director with Highbridge Capital Management as a marketing and product specialist for the firm’s hedge fund and private investment strategies. He began his career with Merrill Lynch. Bires received a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from The Ohio State University and earned an MBA from Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. He is a CFA Charterholder. 50 South Capital Advisors, LLC is an alternatives asset management firm designed to meet the core strategic needs of investors seeking access to private equity and hedge funds. Its highly experienced team works closely with a wide range of investors to fulfill specific investment objectives and create lasting relationships. 50 South Capital’s investment philosophy focuses on providing access primarily to small-to-mid sized managers that offer unique and differentiated sources of return. 50 South Capital is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Northern Trust Corporation. Visit www.50SouthCapital.com for more information. Northern Trust Corporation (Nasdaq: NTRS) is a leading provider of wealth management, asset servicing, asset management and banking to corporations, institutions, affluent families and individuals. Founded in Chicago in 1889, Northern Trust has offices in the United States in 19 states and Washington, D.C., and 22 international locations in Canada, Europe, the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region. As of September 30, 2016, Northern Trust had assets under custody of US$6.7 trillion, and assets under management of US$946 billion. For more than 125 years, Northern Trust has earned distinction as an industry leader for exceptional service, financial expertise, integrity and innovation. Visit northerntrust.com or follow us on Twitter @NorthernTrust. Northern Trust Corporation, Head Office: 50 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603 U.S.A., incorporated with limited liability in the U.S. Global legal and regulatory information can be found at https://www.northerntrust.com/disclosures.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Kevin Stevenson to become CEO following Annual Meeting in June 2017;  Steve Fredrickson will become executive chairman of the PRA Board of Directors NORFOLK, Va., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- PRA Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:PRAA), a global leader in acquiring and collecting nonperforming loans, today announced that Kevin Stevenson will succeed Steve Fredrickson as the chief executive officer of the Company following the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be held on June 1, 2017.  Mr. Stevenson, who co-founded PRA Group and currently serves as president and chief administrative officer, is being appointed as a part of the Board of Directors’ long-term succession plan which was developed when Mr. Fredrickson informed the Board of his desire to eventually step down as CEO.  The plan included Mr. Stevenson’s appointment as president and CAO as well as a director of the Board in August 2015. Mr. Fredrickson, who has served as CEO since founding PRA Group with Mr. Stevenson, will transition to a new role as executive chairman of the PRA Group Board of Directors, where he will continue to focus on helping PRA Group’s strategy, vision and business development efforts.  This planned succession was designed to position the Company for continued success while building on the foundation and principles the Company has maintained for the past 21 years. “I am proud of what our team has been able to accomplish, building PRA Group into a global leader with a long track record of growth and success,” said Steve Fredrickson, chairman and chief executive officer. “I have worked closely with Kevin for more than two decades since before we founded PRA Group, and I am confident in handing the reins to such a qualified leader who shares my commitment to PRA Group’s vision and values.  Together, we believe now is the right time to transition to the next generation of leadership.  Kevin is the best person to lead the Company forward into its next phase of growth and has tremendous experience throughout the entire organization from his roles as CFO, CAO and President.  I look forward to staying involved with the Company in my new role as executive chairman and continuing to work with Kevin and the rest of the Board to keep driving the business forward.” “On behalf of the entire board, I would like to thank Steve for his leadership, commitment and innumerable contributions to PRA Group,” said David Roberts, lead independent director. “Steve, together with Kevin, has built PRA Group into an industry leader from the ground up.  We appreciate Steve’s continued dedication to the Company during this transition process and look forward to benefiting from his experience and knowledge as executive chairman.” Continued Roberts, “The Board began executing a thorough and deliberate succession planning process several years ago when Steve indicated his desire to eventually step down, and we believe that Kevin is the ideal candidate to serve as PRA Group’s next CEO.  With the assistance of an outside search firm, we looked at potential candidates for this role, and Kevin’s experience and background stood out above all others.  During his time at PRA Group, Kevin has overseen nearly every aspect of the Company, having served in both operational and financial roles.  He successfully transitioned from the CFO role to President in 2015 and has been instrumental in driving the Company’s core strategy since the beginning.  Kevin has made significant contributions to position the Company for long-term success, and we are confident he will be a strong leader for PRA Group.” “I am honored by the confidence that the PRA Group Board has placed in me through this appointment as the Company’s second CEO,” said Mr. Stevenson.  “PRA Group has an enviable position as a global industry leader due to a relentless focus on operational excellence and disciplined growth, and I am committed to building on our successful 21-year track record to ensure we continue to deliver enhanced shareholder returns.  On behalf of PRA Group’s 4,000 employees across the world, I would also like to thank Steve for his contributions to the Company.  It has been an honor to serve alongside Steve, and I look forward to working closely with him over the next several months to execute a smooth and orderly transition.” About Kevin Stevenson Mr. Stevenson co-founded PRA with Steve Fredrickson in 1996. Over his two decades at PRA Group, Mr. Stevenson has served in numerous operational and financial roles, and has managed a broad range of functions, including Accounting and Finance, Collection Operations, Quality Control, Investor Relations, IT, HR and Property.  Mr. Stevenson served as the Company’s first chief financial officer and successfully led the Company through its IPO in 2002, multiple secondary offerings, several syndicated loan transactions, a convertible debt issuance and numerous transactions, including the Company’s transformative acquisition of Aktiv Kapital in 2014. In August 2015, the Board appointed Mr. Stevenson as president and chief administrative officer and named him as a director of the board. Before co-founding PRA, he served as controller and department manager of financial control and operations support at Household Recovery Services (HRSC) from 1994 to 1996. Prior to joining HRSC, Mr. Stevenson held various positions at Household Bank from 1987-1994, culminating in his role as controller of Household Bank's regional processing center in Worthington, Ohio, where he also managed the collections, technology, research and ATM departments. Mr. Stevenson is a Certified Public Accountant and received his bachelor’s degree in Accounting from The Ohio State University. He currently serves on the boards of the Sandler Center Foundation, the Greater Norfolk Corporation, as well as the EQUI-KIDS Therapeutic Riding Program of Virginia Beach, Virginia. About Steve Fredrickson Mr. Fredrickson co-founded PRA with Mr. Stevenson in 1996.  He has been CEO since that time, and has been Chairman of the Board of Directors and CEO from PRA Group’s 2002 IPO.  Under his leadership, PRA has grown from a start-up to a global leader in nonperforming loan purchasing and servicing with more than 4,000 employees in 14 countries.  Mr. Fredrickson has 35 years of experience in financial services including leadership roles at Household Recovery Services’ Portfolio Services Group and Household Commercial Financial Services. Prior to joining Household, Mr. Fredrickson specialized in corporate and real estate workouts at Continental Bank of Chicago. Mr. Fredrickson has an MBA from the University of Illinois and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. In addition, he is very active in the community, serving as a member of the board of directors for United Way of South Hampton Roads and the St. Mary’s Home Foundation. He is also on the executive advisory council of the College of Business and Public Administration at Old Dominion University and is a Trustee of the Eastern Virginia Medical School Foundation. About PRA Group As a global leader in acquiring and collecting nonperforming loans, PRA Group, Inc. returns capital to banks and other creditors to help expand financial services for consumers in the Americas and Europe. With over 4,000 employees worldwide, PRA Group companies collaborate with customers to help them resolve their debt and provide a broad range of additional revenue and recovery services to business clients. For more information, please visit www.pragroup.com. About Forward Looking Statements Statements made herein which are not historical in nature, including PRA Group’s or its management's intentions, beliefs, expectations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The forward-looking statements in this press release are based upon management's current beliefs, estimates, assumptions and expectations of PRA Group’s future operations and financial and economic performance, taking into account currently available information. These statements are not statements of historical fact or guarantees of future performance, and there can be no assurance that anticipated events will transpire or that our expectations will prove to be correct. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, some of which are not currently known to PRA Group. Actual events or results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in any such forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including risk factors and other risks that are described from time to time in PRA Group’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission including but not limited to PRA Group’s annual reports on Form 10-K, its quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and its current reports on Form 8-K, which are available through PRA Group's website and contain a detailed discussion of PRA Group's business, including risks and uncertainties that may affect future results. Due to such uncertainties and risks, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of today. Information in this press release may be superseded by recent information or statements, which may be disclosed in later press releases, subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission or otherwise. Except as required by law, PRA Group assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect any change in PRA Group’s expectations with regard thereto or to reflect any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such forward-looking statements are based, in whole or in part.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Kevin Stevenson to become CEO following Annual Meeting in June 2017;  Steve Fredrickson will become executive chairman of the PRA Board of Directors NORFOLK, Va., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- PRA Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:PRAA), a global leader in acquiring and collecting nonperforming loans, today announced that Kevin Stevenson will succeed Steve Fredrickson as the chief executive officer of the Company following the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be held on June 1, 2017.  Mr. Stevenson, who co-founded PRA Group and currently serves as president and chief administrative officer, is being appointed as a part of the Board of Directors’ long-term succession plan which was developed when Mr. Fredrickson informed the Board of his desire to eventually step down as CEO.  The plan included Mr. Stevenson’s appointment as president and CAO as well as a director of the Board in August 2015. Mr. Fredrickson, who has served as CEO since founding PRA Group with Mr. Stevenson, will transition to a new role as executive chairman of the PRA Group Board of Directors, where he will continue to focus on helping PRA Group’s strategy, vision and business development efforts.  This planned succession was designed to position the Company for continued success while building on the foundation and principles the Company has maintained for the past 21 years. “I am proud of what our team has been able to accomplish, building PRA Group into a global leader with a long track record of growth and success,” said Steve Fredrickson, chairman and chief executive officer. “I have worked closely with Kevin for more than two decades since before we founded PRA Group, and I am confident in handing the reins to such a qualified leader who shares my commitment to PRA Group’s vision and values.  Together, we believe now is the right time to transition to the next generation of leadership.  Kevin is the best person to lead the Company forward into its next phase of growth and has tremendous experience throughout the entire organization from his roles as CFO, CAO and President.  I look forward to staying involved with the Company in my new role as executive chairman and continuing to work with Kevin and the rest of the Board to keep driving the business forward.” “On behalf of the entire board, I would like to thank Steve for his leadership, commitment and innumerable contributions to PRA Group,” said David Roberts, lead independent director. “Steve, together with Kevin, has built PRA Group into an industry leader from the ground up.  We appreciate Steve’s continued dedication to the Company during this transition process and look forward to benefiting from his experience and knowledge as executive chairman.” Continued Roberts, “The Board began executing a thorough and deliberate succession planning process several years ago when Steve indicated his desire to eventually step down, and we believe that Kevin is the ideal candidate to serve as PRA Group’s next CEO.  With the assistance of an outside search firm, we looked at potential candidates for this role, and Kevin’s experience and background stood out above all others.  During his time at PRA Group, Kevin has overseen nearly every aspect of the Company, having served in both operational and financial roles.  He successfully transitioned from the CFO role to President in 2015 and has been instrumental in driving the Company’s core strategy since the beginning.  Kevin has made significant contributions to position the Company for long-term success, and we are confident he will be a strong leader for PRA Group.” “I am honored by the confidence that the PRA Group Board has placed in me through this appointment as the Company’s second CEO,” said Mr. Stevenson.  “PRA Group has an enviable position as a global industry leader due to a relentless focus on operational excellence and disciplined growth, and I am committed to building on our successful 21-year track record to ensure we continue to deliver enhanced shareholder returns.  On behalf of PRA Group’s 4,000 employees across the world, I would also like to thank Steve for his contributions to the Company.  It has been an honor to serve alongside Steve, and I look forward to working closely with him over the next several months to execute a smooth and orderly transition.” About Kevin Stevenson Mr. Stevenson co-founded PRA with Steve Fredrickson in 1996. Over his two decades at PRA Group, Mr. Stevenson has served in numerous operational and financial roles, and has managed a broad range of functions, including Accounting and Finance, Collection Operations, Quality Control, Investor Relations, IT, HR and Property.  Mr. Stevenson served as the Company’s first chief financial officer and successfully led the Company through its IPO in 2002, multiple secondary offerings, several syndicated loan transactions, a convertible debt issuance and numerous transactions, including the Company’s transformative acquisition of Aktiv Kapital in 2014. In August 2015, the Board appointed Mr. Stevenson as president and chief administrative officer and named him as a director of the board. Before co-founding PRA, he served as controller and department manager of financial control and operations support at Household Recovery Services (HRSC) from 1994 to 1996. Prior to joining HRSC, Mr. Stevenson held various positions at Household Bank from 1987-1994, culminating in his role as controller of Household Bank's regional processing center in Worthington, Ohio, where he also managed the collections, technology, research and ATM departments. Mr. Stevenson is a Certified Public Accountant and received his bachelor’s degree in Accounting from The Ohio State University. He currently serves on the boards of the Sandler Center Foundation, the Greater Norfolk Corporation, as well as the EQUI-KIDS Therapeutic Riding Program of Virginia Beach, Virginia. About Steve Fredrickson Mr. Fredrickson co-founded PRA with Mr. Stevenson in 1996.  He has been CEO since that time, and has been Chairman of the Board of Directors and CEO from PRA Group’s 2002 IPO.  Under his leadership, PRA has grown from a start-up to a global leader in nonperforming loan purchasing and servicing with more than 4,000 employees in 14 countries.  Mr. Fredrickson has 35 years of experience in financial services including leadership roles at Household Recovery Services’ Portfolio Services Group and Household Commercial Financial Services. Prior to joining Household, Mr. Fredrickson specialized in corporate and real estate workouts at Continental Bank of Chicago. Mr. Fredrickson has an MBA from the University of Illinois and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. In addition, he is very active in the community, serving as a member of the board of directors for United Way of South Hampton Roads and the St. Mary’s Home Foundation. He is also on the executive advisory council of the College of Business and Public Administration at Old Dominion University and is a Trustee of the Eastern Virginia Medical School Foundation. About PRA Group As a global leader in acquiring and collecting nonperforming loans, PRA Group, Inc. returns capital to banks and other creditors to help expand financial services for consumers in the Americas and Europe. With over 4,000 employees worldwide, PRA Group companies collaborate with customers to help them resolve their debt and provide a broad range of additional revenue and recovery services to business clients. For more information, please visit www.pragroup.com. About Forward Looking Statements Statements made herein which are not historical in nature, including PRA Group’s or its management's intentions, beliefs, expectations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The forward-looking statements in this press release are based upon management's current beliefs, estimates, assumptions and expectations of PRA Group’s future operations and financial and economic performance, taking into account currently available information. These statements are not statements of historical fact or guarantees of future performance, and there can be no assurance that anticipated events will transpire or that our expectations will prove to be correct. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, some of which are not currently known to PRA Group. Actual events or results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in any such forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including risk factors and other risks that are described from time to time in PRA Group’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission including but not limited to PRA Group’s annual reports on Form 10-K, its quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and its current reports on Form 8-K, which are available through PRA Group's website and contain a detailed discussion of PRA Group's business, including risks and uncertainties that may affect future results. Due to such uncertainties and risks, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of today. Information in this press release may be superseded by recent information or statements, which may be disclosed in later press releases, subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission or otherwise. Except as required by law, PRA Group assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect any change in PRA Group’s expectations with regard thereto or to reflect any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such forward-looking statements are based, in whole or in part.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Kevin Stevenson to become CEO following Annual Meeting in June 2017;  Steve Fredrickson will become executive chairman of the PRA Board of Directors NORFOLK, Va., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- PRA Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:PRAA), a global leader in acquiring and collecting nonperforming loans, today announced that Kevin Stevenson will succeed Steve Fredrickson as the chief executive officer of the Company following the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be held on June 1, 2017.  Mr. Stevenson, who co-founded PRA Group and currently serves as president and chief administrative officer, is being appointed as a part of the Board of Directors’ long-term succession plan which was developed when Mr. Fredrickson informed the Board of his desire to eventually step down as CEO.  The plan included Mr. Stevenson’s appointment as president and CAO as well as a director of the Board in August 2015. Mr. Fredrickson, who has served as CEO since founding PRA Group with Mr. Stevenson, will transition to a new role as executive chairman of the PRA Group Board of Directors, where he will continue to focus on helping PRA Group’s strategy, vision and business development efforts.  This planned succession was designed to position the Company for continued success while building on the foundation and principles the Company has maintained for the past 21 years. “I am proud of what our team has been able to accomplish, building PRA Group into a global leader with a long track record of growth and success,” said Steve Fredrickson, chairman and chief executive officer. “I have worked closely with Kevin for more than two decades since before we founded PRA Group, and I am confident in handing the reins to such a qualified leader who shares my commitment to PRA Group’s vision and values.  Together, we believe now is the right time to transition to the next generation of leadership.  Kevin is the best person to lead the Company forward into its next phase of growth and has tremendous experience throughout the entire organization from his roles as CFO, CAO and President.  I look forward to staying involved with the Company in my new role as executive chairman and continuing to work with Kevin and the rest of the Board to keep driving the business forward.” “On behalf of the entire board, I would like to thank Steve for his leadership, commitment and innumerable contributions to PRA Group,” said David Roberts, lead independent director. “Steve, together with Kevin, has built PRA Group into an industry leader from the ground up.  We appreciate Steve’s continued dedication to the Company during this transition process and look forward to benefiting from his experience and knowledge as executive chairman.” Continued Roberts, “The Board began executing a thorough and deliberate succession planning process several years ago when Steve indicated his desire to eventually step down, and we believe that Kevin is the ideal candidate to serve as PRA Group’s next CEO.  With the assistance of an outside search firm, we looked at potential candidates for this role, and Kevin’s experience and background stood out above all others.  During his time at PRA Group, Kevin has overseen nearly every aspect of the Company, having served in both operational and financial roles.  He successfully transitioned from the CFO role to President in 2015 and has been instrumental in driving the Company’s core strategy since the beginning.  Kevin has made significant contributions to position the Company for long-term success, and we are confident he will be a strong leader for PRA Group.” “I am honored by the confidence that the PRA Group Board has placed in me through this appointment as the Company’s second CEO,” said Mr. Stevenson.  “PRA Group has an enviable position as a global industry leader due to a relentless focus on operational excellence and disciplined growth, and I am committed to building on our successful 21-year track record to ensure we continue to deliver enhanced shareholder returns.  On behalf of PRA Group’s 4,000 employees across the world, I would also like to thank Steve for his contributions to the Company.  It has been an honor to serve alongside Steve, and I look forward to working closely with him over the next several months to execute a smooth and orderly transition.” About Kevin Stevenson Mr. Stevenson co-founded PRA with Steve Fredrickson in 1996. Over his two decades at PRA Group, Mr. Stevenson has served in numerous operational and financial roles, and has managed a broad range of functions, including Accounting and Finance, Collection Operations, Quality Control, Investor Relations, IT, HR and Property.  Mr. Stevenson served as the Company’s first chief financial officer and successfully led the Company through its IPO in 2002, multiple secondary offerings, several syndicated loan transactions, a convertible debt issuance and numerous transactions, including the Company’s transformative acquisition of Aktiv Kapital in 2014. In August 2015, the Board appointed Mr. Stevenson as president and chief administrative officer and named him as a director of the board. Before co-founding PRA, he served as controller and department manager of financial control and operations support at Household Recovery Services (HRSC) from 1994 to 1996. Prior to joining HRSC, Mr. Stevenson held various positions at Household Bank from 1987-1994, culminating in his role as controller of Household Bank's regional processing center in Worthington, Ohio, where he also managed the collections, technology, research and ATM departments. Mr. Stevenson is a Certified Public Accountant and received his bachelor’s degree in Accounting from The Ohio State University. He currently serves on the boards of the Sandler Center Foundation, the Greater Norfolk Corporation, as well as the EQUI-KIDS Therapeutic Riding Program of Virginia Beach, Virginia. About Steve Fredrickson Mr. Fredrickson co-founded PRA with Mr. Stevenson in 1996.  He has been CEO since that time, and has been Chairman of the Board of Directors and CEO from PRA Group’s 2002 IPO.  Under his leadership, PRA has grown from a start-up to a global leader in nonperforming loan purchasing and servicing with more than 4,000 employees in 14 countries.  Mr. Fredrickson has 35 years of experience in financial services including leadership roles at Household Recovery Services’ Portfolio Services Group and Household Commercial Financial Services. Prior to joining Household, Mr. Fredrickson specialized in corporate and real estate workouts at Continental Bank of Chicago. Mr. Fredrickson has an MBA from the University of Illinois and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. In addition, he is very active in the community, serving as a member of the board of directors for United Way of South Hampton Roads and the St. Mary’s Home Foundation. He is also on the executive advisory council of the College of Business and Public Administration at Old Dominion University and is a Trustee of the Eastern Virginia Medical School Foundation. About PRA Group As a global leader in acquiring and collecting nonperforming loans, PRA Group, Inc. returns capital to banks and other creditors to help expand financial services for consumers in the Americas and Europe. With over 4,000 employees worldwide, PRA Group companies collaborate with customers to help them resolve their debt and provide a broad range of additional revenue and recovery services to business clients. For more information, please visit www.pragroup.com. About Forward Looking Statements Statements made herein which are not historical in nature, including PRA Group’s or its management's intentions, beliefs, expectations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The forward-looking statements in this press release are based upon management's current beliefs, estimates, assumptions and expectations of PRA Group’s future operations and financial and economic performance, taking into account currently available information. These statements are not statements of historical fact or guarantees of future performance, and there can be no assurance that anticipated events will transpire or that our expectations will prove to be correct. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, some of which are not currently known to PRA Group. Actual events or results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in any such forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including risk factors and other risks that are described from time to time in PRA Group’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission including but not limited to PRA Group’s annual reports on Form 10-K, its quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and its current reports on Form 8-K, which are available through PRA Group's website and contain a detailed discussion of PRA Group's business, including risks and uncertainties that may affect future results. Due to such uncertainties and risks, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of today. Information in this press release may be superseded by recent information or statements, which may be disclosed in later press releases, subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission or otherwise. Except as required by law, PRA Group assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect any change in PRA Group’s expectations with regard thereto or to reflect any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such forward-looking statements are based, in whole or in part.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Kevin Stevenson to become CEO following Annual Meeting in June 2017;  Steve Fredrickson will become executive chairman of the PRA Board of Directors NORFOLK, Va., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- PRA Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:PRAA), a global leader in acquiring and collecting nonperforming loans, today announced that Kevin Stevenson will succeed Steve Fredrickson as the chief executive officer of the Company following the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be held on June 1, 2017.  Mr. Stevenson, who co-founded PRA Group and currently serves as president and chief administrative officer, is being appointed as a part of the Board of Directors’ long-term succession plan which was developed when Mr. Fredrickson informed the Board of his desire to eventually step down as CEO.  The plan included Mr. Stevenson’s appointment as president and CAO as well as a director of the Board in August 2015. Mr. Fredrickson, who has served as CEO since founding PRA Group with Mr. Stevenson, will transition to a new role as executive chairman of the PRA Group Board of Directors, where he will continue to focus on helping PRA Group’s strategy, vision and business development efforts.  This planned succession was designed to position the Company for continued success while building on the foundation and principles the Company has maintained for the past 21 years. “I am proud of what our team has been able to accomplish, building PRA Group into a global leader with a long track record of growth and success,” said Steve Fredrickson, chairman and chief executive officer. “I have worked closely with Kevin for more than two decades since before we founded PRA Group, and I am confident in handing the reins to such a qualified leader who shares my commitment to PRA Group’s vision and values.  Together, we believe now is the right time to transition to the next generation of leadership.  Kevin is the best person to lead the Company forward into its next phase of growth and has tremendous experience throughout the entire organization from his roles as CFO, CAO and President.  I look forward to staying involved with the Company in my new role as executive chairman and continuing to work with Kevin and the rest of the Board to keep driving the business forward.” “On behalf of the entire board, I would like to thank Steve for his leadership, commitment and innumerable contributions to PRA Group,” said David Roberts, lead independent director. “Steve, together with Kevin, has built PRA Group into an industry leader from the ground up.  We appreciate Steve’s continued dedication to the Company during this transition process and look forward to benefiting from his experience and knowledge as executive chairman.” Continued Roberts, “The Board began executing a thorough and deliberate succession planning process several years ago when Steve indicated his desire to eventually step down, and we believe that Kevin is the ideal candidate to serve as PRA Group’s next CEO.  With the assistance of an outside search firm, we looked at potential candidates for this role, and Kevin’s experience and background stood out above all others.  During his time at PRA Group, Kevin has overseen nearly every aspect of the Company, having served in both operational and financial roles.  He successfully transitioned from the CFO role to President in 2015 and has been instrumental in driving the Company’s core strategy since the beginning.  Kevin has made significant contributions to position the Company for long-term success, and we are confident he will be a strong leader for PRA Group.” “I am honored by the confidence that the PRA Group Board has placed in me through this appointment as the Company’s second CEO,” said Mr. Stevenson.  “PRA Group has an enviable position as a global industry leader due to a relentless focus on operational excellence and disciplined growth, and I am committed to building on our successful 21-year track record to ensure we continue to deliver enhanced shareholder returns.  On behalf of PRA Group’s 4,000 employees across the world, I would also like to thank Steve for his contributions to the Company.  It has been an honor to serve alongside Steve, and I look forward to working closely with him over the next several months to execute a smooth and orderly transition.” About Kevin Stevenson Mr. Stevenson co-founded PRA with Steve Fredrickson in 1996. Over his two decades at PRA Group, Mr. Stevenson has served in numerous operational and financial roles, and has managed a broad range of functions, including Accounting and Finance, Collection Operations, Quality Control, Investor Relations, IT, HR and Property.  Mr. Stevenson served as the Company’s first chief financial officer and successfully led the Company through its IPO in 2002, multiple secondary offerings, several syndicated loan transactions, a convertible debt issuance and numerous transactions, including the Company’s transformative acquisition of Aktiv Kapital in 2014. In August 2015, the Board appointed Mr. Stevenson as president and chief administrative officer and named him as a director of the board. Before co-founding PRA, he served as controller and department manager of financial control and operations support at Household Recovery Services (HRSC) from 1994 to 1996. Prior to joining HRSC, Mr. Stevenson held various positions at Household Bank from 1987-1994, culminating in his role as controller of Household Bank's regional processing center in Worthington, Ohio, where he also managed the collections, technology, research and ATM departments. Mr. Stevenson is a Certified Public Accountant and received his bachelor’s degree in Accounting from The Ohio State University. He currently serves on the boards of the Sandler Center Foundation, the Greater Norfolk Corporation, as well as the EQUI-KIDS Therapeutic Riding Program of Virginia Beach, Virginia. About Steve Fredrickson Mr. Fredrickson co-founded PRA with Mr. Stevenson in 1996.  He has been CEO since that time, and has been Chairman of the Board of Directors and CEO from PRA Group’s 2002 IPO.  Under his leadership, PRA has grown from a start-up to a global leader in nonperforming loan purchasing and servicing with more than 4,000 employees in 14 countries.  Mr. Fredrickson has 35 years of experience in financial services including leadership roles at Household Recovery Services’ Portfolio Services Group and Household Commercial Financial Services. Prior to joining Household, Mr. Fredrickson specialized in corporate and real estate workouts at Continental Bank of Chicago. Mr. Fredrickson has an MBA from the University of Illinois and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. In addition, he is very active in the community, serving as a member of the board of directors for United Way of South Hampton Roads and the St. Mary’s Home Foundation. He is also on the executive advisory council of the College of Business and Public Administration at Old Dominion University and is a Trustee of the Eastern Virginia Medical School Foundation. About PRA Group As a global leader in acquiring and collecting nonperforming loans, PRA Group, Inc. returns capital to banks and other creditors to help expand financial services for consumers in the Americas and Europe. With over 4,000 employees worldwide, PRA Group companies collaborate with customers to help them resolve their debt and provide a broad range of additional revenue and recovery services to business clients. For more information, please visit www.pragroup.com. About Forward Looking Statements Statements made herein which are not historical in nature, including PRA Group’s or its management's intentions, beliefs, expectations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The forward-looking statements in this press release are based upon management's current beliefs, estimates, assumptions and expectations of PRA Group’s future operations and financial and economic performance, taking into account currently available information. These statements are not statements of historical fact or guarantees of future performance, and there can be no assurance that anticipated events will transpire or that our expectations will prove to be correct. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, some of which are not currently known to PRA Group. Actual events or results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in any such forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including risk factors and other risks that are described from time to time in PRA Group’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission including but not limited to PRA Group’s annual reports on Form 10-K, its quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and its current reports on Form 8-K, which are available through PRA Group's website and contain a detailed discussion of PRA Group's business, including risks and uncertainties that may affect future results. Due to such uncertainties and risks, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of today. Information in this press release may be superseded by recent information or statements, which may be disclosed in later press releases, subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission or otherwise. Except as required by law, PRA Group assumes no obligation to publicly update or revise its forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect any change in PRA Group’s expectations with regard thereto or to reflect any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such forward-looking statements are based, in whole or in part.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

ATLANTA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Board of Directors of The Coca-Cola Company today elected four new officers. Barry Simpson, who was recently named Chief Information Officer, was elected as a Senior Vice President. In addition, Robert Long, Global Vice President of Research and Development; Bernard McGuinness, Vice President of Science; and Darlene Nicosia, Vice President of Commercial Product Supply were elected as Vice Presidents of the company. Each of the elections is effective immediately. Simpson, 56, became Chief Information Officer earlier this fall, and oversees all of the company’s global information technology strategy, services and operations. A nearly 30-year IT industry veteran, Simpson joined the Coca-Cola system in 2008 as Group CIO of the Coca-Cola Amatil (CCA) Group. He joined The Coca-Cola Company in Atlanta in January 2016. Before joining the Coca-Cola system, Simpson served in various IT leadership roles for Colgate-Palmolive based in Australia, Malaysia and the United States from 1990-2008. He holds a Bachelor’s of Economics from Sydney University and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Long, 59, has served as Global Vice President of Research and Development since June. In this role, he oversees the development of strategy and supporting capability to deliver technical innovation that supports the global business. He joined the company in 2004 as Vice President of Global Packaging Platforms and played a key role in the development of contour aluminum bottles and new sustainable packaging. He also has served as head of the company’s Research and Development Center in Tokyo and led the technical functions for Coca-Cola North America. Long holds a Bachelor of Science and Engineering degree in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University and an MBA in Finance from Xavier University of Ohio. McGuinness, 50, is a 17-year Coca-Cola veteran who recently was appointed Vice President of Science. In this role he is responsible for leading Flavor Manufacturing, Flavor Ingredient Supply and Ingredient Quality. Since 2012, he has been responsible for all aspects of quality assurance and the implementation of environmental and safety standards across the company’s global concentrate manufacturing operations, most recently as Director of Process Optimization and Quality for Commercial Product Supply. He joined the company in Ballina, Ireland in 1999 and was named General Manager of the Ballina facility in 2009. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the National University of Ireland in Galway. As Vice President of Commercial Product Supply, Nicosia, 48, leads a multi-billion dollar supply chain responsible for the manufacturing and sale of concentrates and beverage bases to Coca-Cola bottlers globally. Since joining the company in 1993 as an analyst in the Coca-Cola North America Fountain division, Nicosia has held positions of increasing responsibility, including as Distributor Account Executive for the company’s McDonald’s Division, Director of Procurement for the Coca-Cola Europe Group, and as the company’s Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer. Nicosia holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Business from The Ohio State University and a Master’s degree in Business Management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Simpson, Long, McGuinness and Nicosia each are based in Atlanta. The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is the world's largest beverage company, refreshing consumers with more than 500 sparkling and still brands and more than 3,800 beverage choices. Led by Coca-Cola, one of the world's most valuable and recognizable brands, our company’s portfolio features 20 billion-dollar brands, 18 of which are available in reduced-, low- or no-calorie options. Our billion-dollar brands include Diet Coke, Coca-Cola Zero, Fanta, Sprite, Dasani, vitaminwater, Powerade, Minute Maid, Simply, Del Valle, Georgia and Gold Peak. Through the world's largest beverage distribution system, we are the No. 1 provider of both sparkling and still beverages. More than 1.9 billion servings of our beverages are enjoyed by consumers in more than 200 countries each day. With an enduring commitment to building sustainable communities, our company is focused on initiatives that reduce our environmental footprint, create a safe, inclusive work environment for our associates, and enhance the economic development of the communities where we operate. Together with our bottling partners, we rank among the world's top 10 private employers with more than 700,000 system associates. For more information, visit Coca-Cola Journey at www.coca-colacompany.com, follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/CocaColaCo, visit our blog, Coca-Cola Unbottled, at www.cocacolablog.com or find us on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/company/the-coca-colacompany.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

GEORGE TOWN, Grand Cayman, Dec. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- O Micro® International Limited (NASDAQ:OIIM), a global leader in the design, development and marketing of high-performance integrated circuits and solutions, today announced that the Board of Directors have elected Dr. Vijay Kumar to serve on the Company's Board. Dr. Kumar brings to O2Micro’s Board of Directors his extensive experience in Embedded Internetworking of Cyber-Physical Systems, Internet of Things, Mechanical, Electrical and Systems Engineering, along with industry leading Autonomous Robotics and Computer Learning technologies. He will replace Mr. Zhuoping Yu as a Class III Director, who is resigning from the Board.  Dr. Kumar will also be a member of the Company’s nominating committee.  “We are extremely pleased to welcome Dr. Kumar as a member of O2Micro’s Board of Directors,” said Sterling Du, chairman and CEO of O2Micro. “His broad, industry experience will provide valuable insight to O2Micro as we continue to expand the scope and impact of power and battery management products and technology designed to improve and enhance people’s lives around the world.” Dr. Kumar received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987. He is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering and been a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Dr. Kumar has held many administrative positions in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, including director of the GRASP Laboratory, chair of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and the position of Deputy Dean. He also served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Founded in April 1995, O Micro develops and markets innovative power management components for the Computer, Consumer, Industrial, Automotive and Communications markets. Products include LED General Lighting, Backlighting, Battery Management, and Power Management. O Micro International maintains an extensive portfolio of intellectual property with 1,693 patent claims granted, and over 33,000 more pending. The company maintains offices worldwide. Additional company and product information can be found on the company website at www.o2micro.com. O Micro, the O Micro logo, and combinations thereof are registered trademarks of O Micro. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Statements made in this release that are not historical, including statements regarding O Micro's or management's intentions, hopes, beliefs, expectations, representations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in these statements. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include risks and uncertainties such as reduced demand for products of electronic equipment manufacturers which include O Micro's products due to adverse economic conditions in general or specifically affecting O Micro's markets, technical difficulties and delays in the developments process, and errors in the products. You are also referred to the Form F-1 in connection with the company's initial public offering in August 2000, Form F-3 in connection with the company's public offering in November 2001, and the annual reports on Form 20-F, which identify important risk factors that could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the forward-looking statements. The company assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

GEORGE TOWN, Grand Cayman, Dec. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- O Micro® International Limited (NASDAQ:OIIM), a global leader in the design, development and marketing of high-performance integrated circuits and solutions, today announced that the Board of Directors have elected Dr. Vijay Kumar to serve on the Company's Board. Dr. Kumar brings to O2Micro’s Board of Directors his extensive experience in Embedded Internetworking of Cyber-Physical Systems, Internet of Things, Mechanical, Electrical and Systems Engineering, along with industry leading Autonomous Robotics and Computer Learning technologies. He will replace Mr. Zhuoping Yu as a Class III Director, who is resigning from the Board.  Dr. Kumar will also be a member of the Company’s nominating committee.  “We are extremely pleased to welcome Dr. Kumar as a member of O2Micro’s Board of Directors,” said Sterling Du, chairman and CEO of O2Micro. “His broad, industry experience will provide valuable insight to O2Micro as we continue to expand the scope and impact of power and battery management products and technology designed to improve and enhance people’s lives around the world.” Dr. Kumar received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987. He is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering and been a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Dr. Kumar has held many administrative positions in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, including director of the GRASP Laboratory, chair of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and the position of Deputy Dean. He also served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Founded in April 1995, O Micro develops and markets innovative power management components for the Computer, Consumer, Industrial, Automotive and Communications markets. Products include LED General Lighting, Backlighting, Battery Management, and Power Management. O Micro International maintains an extensive portfolio of intellectual property with 1,693 patent claims granted, and over 33,000 more pending. The company maintains offices worldwide. Additional company and product information can be found on the company website at www.o2micro.com. O Micro, the O Micro logo, and combinations thereof are registered trademarks of O Micro. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Statements made in this release that are not historical, including statements regarding O Micro's or management's intentions, hopes, beliefs, expectations, representations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in these statements. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include risks and uncertainties such as reduced demand for products of electronic equipment manufacturers which include O Micro's products due to adverse economic conditions in general or specifically affecting O Micro's markets, technical difficulties and delays in the developments process, and errors in the products. You are also referred to the Form F-1 in connection with the company's initial public offering in August 2000, Form F-3 in connection with the company's public offering in November 2001, and the annual reports on Form 20-F, which identify important risk factors that could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the forward-looking statements. The company assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

GEORGE TOWN, Grand Cayman, Dec. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- O Micro® International Limited (NASDAQ:OIIM), a global leader in the design, development and marketing of high-performance integrated circuits and solutions, today announced that the Board of Directors have elected Dr. Vijay Kumar to serve on the Company's Board. Dr. Kumar brings to O2Micro’s Board of Directors his extensive experience in Embedded Internetworking of Cyber-Physical Systems, Internet of Things, Mechanical, Electrical and Systems Engineering, along with industry leading Autonomous Robotics and Computer Learning technologies. He will replace Mr. Zhuoping Yu as a Class III Director, who is resigning from the Board.  Dr. Kumar will also be a member of the Company’s nominating committee.  “We are extremely pleased to welcome Dr. Kumar as a member of O2Micro’s Board of Directors,” said Sterling Du, chairman and CEO of O2Micro. “His broad, industry experience will provide valuable insight to O2Micro as we continue to expand the scope and impact of power and battery management products and technology designed to improve and enhance people’s lives around the world.” Dr. Kumar received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987. He is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering and been a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Dr. Kumar has held many administrative positions in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, including director of the GRASP Laboratory, chair of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and the position of Deputy Dean. He also served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Founded in April 1995, O Micro develops and markets innovative power management components for the Computer, Consumer, Industrial, Automotive and Communications markets. Products include LED General Lighting, Backlighting, Battery Management, and Power Management. O Micro International maintains an extensive portfolio of intellectual property with 1,693 patent claims granted, and over 33,000 more pending. The company maintains offices worldwide. Additional company and product information can be found on the company website at www.o2micro.com. O Micro, the O Micro logo, and combinations thereof are registered trademarks of O Micro. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Statements made in this release that are not historical, including statements regarding O Micro's or management's intentions, hopes, beliefs, expectations, representations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in these statements. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include risks and uncertainties such as reduced demand for products of electronic equipment manufacturers which include O Micro's products due to adverse economic conditions in general or specifically affecting O Micro's markets, technical difficulties and delays in the developments process, and errors in the products. You are also referred to the Form F-1 in connection with the company's initial public offering in August 2000, Form F-3 in connection with the company's public offering in November 2001, and the annual reports on Form 20-F, which identify important risk factors that could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the forward-looking statements. The company assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

GEORGE TOWN, Grand Cayman, Dec. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- O Micro® International Limited (NASDAQ:OIIM), a global leader in the design, development and marketing of high-performance integrated circuits and solutions, today announced that the Board of Directors have elected Dr. Vijay Kumar to serve on the Company's Board. Dr. Kumar brings to O2Micro’s Board of Directors his extensive experience in Embedded Internetworking of Cyber-Physical Systems, Internet of Things, Mechanical, Electrical and Systems Engineering, along with industry leading Autonomous Robotics and Computer Learning technologies. He will replace Mr. Zhuoping Yu as a Class III Director, who is resigning from the Board.  Dr. Kumar will also be a member of the Company’s nominating committee.  “We are extremely pleased to welcome Dr. Kumar as a member of O2Micro’s Board of Directors,” said Sterling Du, chairman and CEO of O2Micro. “His broad, industry experience will provide valuable insight to O2Micro as we continue to expand the scope and impact of power and battery management products and technology designed to improve and enhance people’s lives around the world.” Dr. Kumar received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987. He is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering and been a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Dr. Kumar has held many administrative positions in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, including director of the GRASP Laboratory, chair of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and the position of Deputy Dean. He also served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Founded in April 1995, O Micro develops and markets innovative power management components for the Computer, Consumer, Industrial, Automotive and Communications markets. Products include LED General Lighting, Backlighting, Battery Management, and Power Management. O Micro International maintains an extensive portfolio of intellectual property with 1,693 patent claims granted, and over 33,000 more pending. The company maintains offices worldwide. Additional company and product information can be found on the company website at www.o2micro.com. O Micro, the O Micro logo, and combinations thereof are registered trademarks of O Micro. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Statements made in this release that are not historical, including statements regarding O Micro's or management's intentions, hopes, beliefs, expectations, representations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in these statements. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include risks and uncertainties such as reduced demand for products of electronic equipment manufacturers which include O Micro's products due to adverse economic conditions in general or specifically affecting O Micro's markets, technical difficulties and delays in the developments process, and errors in the products. You are also referred to the Form F-1 in connection with the company's initial public offering in August 2000, Form F-3 in connection with the company's public offering in November 2001, and the annual reports on Form 20-F, which identify important risk factors that could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the forward-looking statements. The company assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

GEORGE TOWN, Grand Cayman, Dec. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- O Micro® International Limited (NASDAQ:OIIM), a global leader in the design, development and marketing of high-performance integrated circuits and solutions, today announced that the Board of Directors have elected Dr. Vijay Kumar to serve on the Company's Board. Dr. Kumar brings to O2Micro’s Board of Directors his extensive experience in Embedded Internetworking of Cyber-Physical Systems, Internet of Things, Mechanical, Electrical and Systems Engineering, along with industry leading Autonomous Robotics and Computer Learning technologies. He will replace Mr. Zhuoping Yu as a Class III Director, who is resigning from the Board.  Dr. Kumar will also be a member of the Company’s nominating committee.  “We are extremely pleased to welcome Dr. Kumar as a member of O2Micro’s Board of Directors,” said Sterling Du, chairman and CEO of O2Micro. “His broad, industry experience will provide valuable insight to O2Micro as we continue to expand the scope and impact of power and battery management products and technology designed to improve and enhance people’s lives around the world.” Dr. Kumar received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987. He is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering and been a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Dr. Kumar has held many administrative positions in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, including director of the GRASP Laboratory, chair of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and the position of Deputy Dean. He also served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Founded in April 1995, O Micro develops and markets innovative power management components for the Computer, Consumer, Industrial, Automotive and Communications markets. Products include LED General Lighting, Backlighting, Battery Management, and Power Management. O Micro International maintains an extensive portfolio of intellectual property with 1,693 patent claims granted, and over 33,000 more pending. The company maintains offices worldwide. Additional company and product information can be found on the company website at www.o2micro.com. O Micro, the O Micro logo, and combinations thereof are registered trademarks of O Micro. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Statements made in this release that are not historical, including statements regarding O Micro's or management's intentions, hopes, beliefs, expectations, representations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in these statements. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include risks and uncertainties such as reduced demand for products of electronic equipment manufacturers which include O Micro's products due to adverse economic conditions in general or specifically affecting O Micro's markets, technical difficulties and delays in the developments process, and errors in the products. You are also referred to the Form F-1 in connection with the company's initial public offering in August 2000, Form F-3 in connection with the company's public offering in November 2001, and the annual reports on Form 20-F, which identify important risk factors that could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the forward-looking statements. The company assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

GEORGE TOWN, Grand Cayman, Dec. 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- O Micro® International Limited (NASDAQ:OIIM), a global leader in the design, development and marketing of high-performance integrated circuits and solutions, today announced that the Board of Directors have elected Dr. Vijay Kumar to serve on the Company's Board. Dr. Kumar brings to O2Micro’s Board of Directors his extensive experience in Embedded Internetworking of Cyber-Physical Systems, Internet of Things, Mechanical, Electrical and Systems Engineering, along with industry leading Autonomous Robotics and Computer Learning technologies. He will replace Mr. Zhuoping Yu as a Class III Director, who is resigning from the Board.  Dr. Kumar will also be a member of the Company’s nominating committee.  “We are extremely pleased to welcome Dr. Kumar as a member of O2Micro’s Board of Directors,” said Sterling Du, chairman and CEO of O2Micro. “His broad, industry experience will provide valuable insight to O2Micro as we continue to expand the scope and impact of power and battery management products and technology designed to improve and enhance people’s lives around the world.” Dr. Kumar received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987. He is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering and been a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Dr. Kumar has held many administrative positions in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, including director of the GRASP Laboratory, chair of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and the position of Deputy Dean. He also served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Founded in April 1995, O Micro develops and markets innovative power management components for the Computer, Consumer, Industrial, Automotive and Communications markets. Products include LED General Lighting, Backlighting, Battery Management, and Power Management. O Micro International maintains an extensive portfolio of intellectual property with 1,693 patent claims granted, and over 33,000 more pending. The company maintains offices worldwide. Additional company and product information can be found on the company website at www.o2micro.com. O Micro, the O Micro logo, and combinations thereof are registered trademarks of O Micro. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Statements made in this release that are not historical, including statements regarding O Micro's or management's intentions, hopes, beliefs, expectations, representations, projections, plans or predictions of the future, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth in these statements. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include risks and uncertainties such as reduced demand for products of electronic equipment manufacturers which include O Micro's products due to adverse economic conditions in general or specifically affecting O Micro's markets, technical difficulties and delays in the developments process, and errors in the products. You are also referred to the Form F-1 in connection with the company's initial public offering in August 2000, Form F-3 in connection with the company's public offering in November 2001, and the annual reports on Form 20-F, which identify important risk factors that could cause actual results to differ from those contained in the forward-looking statements. The company assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


As reported in JNCCN, a recent study from McGill University shows that while opioid use increases during treatment in older patients with breast cancer, most do not continue use into survivorship; however, use of anxiolytics and antidepressants remains high in survivors FORT WASHINGTON, PA--(Marketwired - November 21, 2016) - A new McGill University study published in the November issue of JNCCN - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network found that most patients with breast cancer aged 65 and older use psychotropic and opioid medications during active treatment and often in the first year of survivorship, despite this population's vulnerability to adverse events. According to the authors, this study highlights the need for a multidimensional approach to distress and anxiety that includes comprehensive psychological intervention. The study, "Psychotropic and Opioid Medication Use in Older Patients with Breast Cancer across the Care Trajectory: A Population-Based Cohort Study," is available free-of-charge until February 28, 2017 on JNCCN.org. According to principle investigator, Ari Meguerditchian, MD, MSc, FRCS, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Surgery and Oncology, and member of the Clinical and Health Informatics Research Group at McGill University, "Women over 65 represent the fastest growing segment of breast cancer survivors. The fact that so many of them need mediations for anxiety, depression, and distress even after active cancer care highlights the fact that we know so little about the specific needs of these patients." The researchers followed more than 19,500 women, 65 years or older, diagnosed with incident, non-metastatic breast cancer in Quebec, Canada, and analyzed the use of anxiolytics, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and opioids from precancer baseline through active care and into first-year survivorship. The most prescribed drugs within the population were anxiolytics and antidepressants. Although the percentage of patients on opioids and antipsychotics was lower than the other drugs, with 16.2 percent of patients using antipsychotics and 25 percent using opioids, the authors noted a marked increase in use of opioids and antipsychotics-4.5- and 7-fold, respectively-from baseline to active care. More than 50 percent of women studied used anxiolytics during care-an increase from 36 percent at baseline-and the vast majority of those women (44.4 percent) continued use of the medication into first-year survivorship. Moreover, use of antidepressants among the cohort was 22.4 percent, with 22.3 percent continuing use into survivorship. Dr. Meguerditchian further noted, "Chronic use of these drugs is related to an increased risk of adverse events among these women, notably medication-related falls and injuries. Many studies suggest that this segment of the population is over-medicated." Conversely, the authors saw a notable drop-off in use of antipsychotics and opioids in first-year survivorship. This is likely due, at least in part, to the fact that antipsychotics and opioids are used to treat physical side effects of treatment, such as extreme nausea and pain, which decrease dramatically after treatment. Anxiolytics and antidepressants, on the other hand, are generally prescribed to combat the psychological aspects of diagnosis and treatment such as distress and anxiety, which have an extended effect on the patient. "Our findings raise important questions about the lasting psychological impact of cancer, such as uncertainty of recurrence, family hardships, etc. Are we supporting our older patients as they move to survivorship? How can we best address their needs?" said Dr. Meguerditchian. According to Crystal Denlinger, MD, FACP, Chief, GI Medical Oncology, and Associate Professor in the Department of Hematology/Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center, "This study represents an important overview of high-risk medication use in a vulnerable population, namely older breast cancer survivors. The fact that women increase their use of psychotropic and opioid medications during treatment is not surprising due to the current treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer (ie, surgery and cytotoxic chemotherapy), but the trend toward continued use into survivorship warrants further evaluation as to cause. Given the current campaign to curb opioid abuse in the general population, understanding the reasons for use of these medications and development of better interventions to address underlying causes is critical to ensuring the best outcomes for this, and potentially other, patient populations." About JNCCN - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network More than 23,000 oncologists and other cancer care professionals across the United States read JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This peer-reviewed, indexed medical journal provides the latest information about best clinical practices, health services research, and translational medicine. JNCCN features updates on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®), review articles elaborating on guidelines recommendations, health services research, and case reports highlighting molecular insights in patient care. JNCCN is published by Harborside Press. Visit JNCCN.org. To inquire if you are eligible for a FREE subscription to JNCCN, visit http://www.nccn.org/jnccn/subscribe.asp About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 of the world's leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. The following files are available for download:


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


News Article | December 4, 2015
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Home > Press > 'Nanobombs' might deliver agents that alter gene activity in cancer stem cells Abstract: Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC -- James) have developed nanoparticles that swell and burst when exposed to near-infrared laser light. Such 'nanobombs' might overcome a biological barrier that has blocked development of agents that work by altering the activity -- the expression -- of genes in cancer cells. The agents might kill cancer cells outright or stall their growth. The kinds of agents that change gene expression are generally forms of RNA (ribonucleic acid), and they are notoriously difficult to use as drugs. First, they are readily degraded when free in the bloodstream. In this study, packaging them in nanoparticles that target tumor cells solved that problem. This study, published in the journal Advanced Materials, suggests that the nanobombs might also solve the second problem. When cancer cells take up ordinary nanoparticles, they often enclose them in small compartments called endosomes. This prevents the drug molecules from reaching their target, and they are soon degraded. Along with the therapeutic agent, these nanoparticles contain a chemical that vaporizes, causing them to swell three times or more in size when exposed to near-infrared laser light. The endosomes burst, dispersing the RNA agent into the cell. "A major challenge to using nanoparticles to deliver gene-regulating agents such as microRNAs is the inability of the nanoparticles to escape the compartments, the endosomes, that they are encased in when cells take up the particles," says principal investigator Xiaoming (Shawn) He, PhD, associate professor of Biomedical Engineering and member of the OSUCCC -- James Translational Therapeutics Program. "We believe we've overcome this challenge by developing nanoparticles that include ammonium bicarbonate, a small molecule that vaporizes when exposing the nanoparticles to near-infrared laser light, causing the nanoparticle and endosome to burst, releasing the therapeutic RNA," He explains. For their study, He and colleagues used human prostate-cancer cells and human prostate tumors in an animal model. The nanoparticles were equipped to target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), which are cancer cells that have properties of stem cells. CSCs often resist therapy and are thought to play an important role in cancer development and recurrence. The therapeutic agent in the nanoparticles was a form of microRNA called miR-34a. The researchers chose this molecule because it can lower the levels of a protein that is crucial for CSC survival and may be involved in chemotherapy and radiation therapy resistance. The nanoparticles also encapsulate ammonium bicarbonate, which is a leavening agent sometimes used in baking. Near-infrared laser light, which induces vaporization of the ammonium bicarbonate, can penetrate tissue to a depth of one centimeter (nearly half an inch). For deeper tumors, the light would be delivered using minimally invasive surgery. ### The study's key technical findings include: Nanoparticles with ammonium bicarbonate enlarged more than three times when activated with near-infrared laser (from about 100 nm in diameter at body temperature to more than 300 nm at 43 degrees C. (110 degrees F). Endosomes measure 150-200 nm in diameter; The nanoparticles had great affinity for CSCs and very little for normal human adipose-derived stem cells; The miR-34a nanobombs significantly reduced tumor volume in an animal model that bore human prostate tumors. Funding from an American Cancer Society Research Scholar Grant and a Pelotonia Postdoctoral Fellowship supported this research. Other researchers involved in this study were Hai Wang, Pranay Agarwal, Shuting Zhao and Jianhua Yu, all of The Ohio State University; and Xiongbin Lu of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. About Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 45 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only four centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs. As the cancer program’s 306-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


CHICAGO, Dec. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alvin G. Wee, DDS, M.S., M.P.H., Ph.D. was elected the Education & Research Division Director of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP).   "It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve my speciality in this capacity as Director of Education and Research Division of the ACP. I will work hard to move the education and research agenda of the College forward with the purpose of benefiting all prosthodontists. " said Dr. Wee.   Dr. Wee received his dental degree from National University of Singapore and was awarded a Rotary International Foundation Multi-Year Ambassadorial Scholarship to continue his studies in the US. He completed his Prosthodontic residency with an M.S. degree at the University of Iowa and continued his Maxillofacial Prosthetic fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. His professional career started at The Ohio State University which he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, and continued at University of Nebraska Medical Center (Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) and Creighton University. During that time in full time academics, he also completed an M.P.H., a Ph.D. and a D.D.S. degree. He currently serves as Section Head of Maxillofacial Prosthodontist at the Veterans Affairs Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska where has a practice limited to prosthodontics. He continues to teach part time and also directs his clinical translational research laboratory.   Dr. Wee has been a member of the ACP for the last 22 years and most recently served as the Regional Membership Director of Region IV (Rockies and Plains) and as a member on the ACP Board of Directors for the last two terms. He is also serving as the Treasurer for the International Academy of Oral and Facial Rehabilitation, Recording Secretary for the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics, Assistant Editor of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, and Associate Editor for the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.   Apart from serving his specialty, he has been awarded several teaching awards, including being the inaugural national recipient of the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontic's Claude R. Baker Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching Predoctoral Fixed Prosthodontics. Dr. Wee has also authored 78 peer-reviewed publications, 59 peer-reviewed abstracts, one pending patent, and chapters in three textbooks. Dr. Wee has received research funding as principal investigator (NIH R15 and NIH K23) and co-investigator (NIH R01 and VA RR &D) from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veteran's Affairs, as well as several other agencies, totaling more than $2.6 million in grant funding. His research focuses on the clinical translational aspects of color science with regard to teeth/skin and their respective restorative materials. With the receipt of the Prevent Cancer Foundation fellowship and an NIH K23 award, he has expanded his research focus to the early detection of oral and/or oropharngeal cancer.   Prosthodontists are specialized dentists with advanced training in oral health issues, who are committed to improving patient outcomes. From implants, crowns, veneers, and tooth whitening, to full-mouth reconstruction, prosthodontists specialize in digital dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and sleep apnea solutions.   The ACP is the only prosthodontic specialty organization whose membership is based solely on education credentials. ACP members must be in or have completed an ADA-accredited advanced education program in prosthodontics. About the ACP The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) is the official sponsoring organization for the specialty of prosthodontics, which is one of only nine recognized specialties of the American Dental Association. Founded in 1970, ACP is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing patient care, advancing the art and science of prosthodontics, promoting the specialty of prosthodontics to the public and other dentists and healthcare professionals, ensuring the quality of prosthodontic education, and providing professional services to its membership. For more consumer information visit GoToAPro.org, professionals can visit Prosthodontics.org. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42012


As published in JNCCN, a recent project out of Canada shows that programs identifying stress and distress in patients with cancer increase health care professionals' confidence and awareness of patient-centeredness; outcomes are influenced by site-based navigators and practice size FORT WASHINGTON, PA--(Marketwired - November 01, 2016) - As many as 60 percent of patients with cancer report distress following a cancer diagnosis, and this stress can have significant impacts on patients' well-being, resulting in psychosocial problems, physical side effects, and dissatisfaction with their health care. To examine the impact of distress on patients and health care professionals (HCPs), Linda Watson, PhD, RN, CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services, led the implementation of screening for distress (SFD) as a new standard of care across 17 provincial cancer care sites. More than 250 HCPs across cancer care facilities in Alberta, Canada, participated in educational sessions and adopted this standard of practice. Dr. Watson and Dr. Rie Tamagawa, a senior researcher in provincial practices, found that HCPs who participated in this educational program and utilized SFD routinely reported improved confidence in detecting patient distress and increased awareness of the importance of a patient-centered approach to care. The study, "The Effects of a Provincial-Wide Implementation of Screening for Distress on Health Care Professionals' Confidence and Understanding of Patient-Centered Care in Oncology", is published in the October issue of JNCCN - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Complimentary access to the article is available until December 15, 2016 at JNCCN.org. "Distress can be caused by a variety of issues, concerns, or symptoms, but how distress is experienced and what underlies a person's distress is unique to each person and changes over time. The SFD helps clinicians identify distressed patients and their issues, concerns, or symptoms driving their distress. This project has demonstrated that through clinical review and targeted response to the patient priority issue, improved clinical outcomes and patient experiences can be achieved," said Dr. Watson. For Dr. Watson's quality improvement project, the SFD intervention was implemented as a standard of care at all cancer care facilities in Alberta over a 10-month period. HCPs at all sites completed educational sessions prior to implementation of this new practice. HCPs also completed surveys before and after implementation. Results of the project illustrated a significant increase in participants' confidence in identifying, assessing, and managing distress, as well as their awareness of person-centered care principles following the implementation. HCPs at smaller community cancer centers reported greater person-centered awareness as compared to HCPs at larger tertiary sites throughout the study. HCPs at those smaller sites identified more benefits from the SFD intervention relative to HCPs at the larger sites. This variance, Dr. Tamagawa reports, is likely because smaller, more remote cancer centers have patient navigation as part of their model of care and physicians are treating multiple tumor types. These are likely to contribute to personable patient-provider relationships. The benefits of the SFD was more salient for HCPs taking care of multiple tumor types, suggesting that such intervention is well adopted by physicians who practice as generalist model of care. On the other hand, physicians from larger centers tend to be single-tumor specialists at hospitals that do not employ patient navigation programs -- these participants reported lower awareness in person-centeredness in general, and the SFD intervention potentially posed an additional workload. Prior to adequate SFD training and with less time for patient relationship-building, physicians often lack confidence in their ability to identify and treat patient distress in a timely manner. The study highlighted that SFD intervention can help build this confidence and awareness of person-centered care delivery regardless of the types of care facilities. In Alberta, Dr. Watson shared, "We have found that utilizing a SFD tool that spans the physical, emotional, social, spiritual, practical, and informational domains has been helpful as it reflects the whole patient experience. It has been our experience that using a tool that helps the patient to specify their particular area of concern facilitates meaningful interventions." "Patient distress has received little attention from clinicians, but can have a large impact on patient quality of life. As such, screening for distress will become increasingly important in clinical practices, so information on its implementation is useful for practitioners," said Jimmie C. Holland, MD, Wayne R. Chapman Chair in Psychiatric Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Chair of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) Panel for Distress Management. Complimentary access to the article is available until December 15, 2016 at JNCCN.org. About JNCCN - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network More than 24,000 oncologists and other cancer care professionals across the United States read JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This peer-reviewed, indexed medical journal provides the latest information about best clinical practices, health services research, and translational medicine. JNCCN features updates on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®), review articles elaborating on guidelines recommendations, health services research, and case reports highlighting molecular insights in patient care. JNCCN is published by Harborside Press. Visit JNCCN.org. To inquire if you are eligible for a FREE subscription to JNCCN, visit http://www.nccn.org/jnccn/subscribe.asp About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 of the world's leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. The following files are available for download:


News Article | February 15, 2017
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The scientific review committee of microbial genomics leader, uBiome, has selected a study led by Dr. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, of The Ohio State University, to receive one of the company’s ongoing series of Microbiome Impact Awards. Dr. Kiecolt-Glaser is the Director of The Ohio State Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research. Her study will explore the connection between marital stress and depression and the composition of the gut microbiome. A total of 500 healthy married couples (1,000 individuals in total) will have their gut microbiomes analyzed, and will complete a questionnaire designed to rate their levels of stress and/or depression. Past studies with mice have shown that the microbiome of animals change considerably when stress is experienced, but this study of humans, specifically focusing on marital stress, is a novel investigation on potential gut-brain connections. Stress can lead to inflammation, which, in turn, may be associated with conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other diseases associated with aging. Dr. Kiecolt-Glaser’s innovative study will discover potential links between emotional responses and gut microbiota. It will also help to explain what role relationships have on stress levels that may lead to potential health risks. uBiome’s Microbiome Impact Award will fund the detailed analyses of the microbiomes of the study’s 1,000 participants, using precision sequencing™. The microbiome is the collective term for the ecosystem of many trillions of microorganisms that live both in and on the human body. Many of them play important parts in the support of life. Some bacteria, for example, enable the digestion of foods that the body itself cannot process. Other bacteria allow vitamins to be synthesized. Dr. Kiecolt-Glaser is a clinical psychologist working in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, who has authored more than 250 articles, chapters, and books, the majority of which have been in collaboration with Dr. Ronald Glaser. Their studies have demonstrated important health consequences of stress, including slower wound healing and impaired vaccine responses. They have also shown that chronic stress substantially accelerates inflammation, and personal relationships can influence immune and endocrine function as well as health. In addition to her position as Director of The Ohio State Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Dr. Kiecolt-Glaser holds the titles of Distinguished University Professor and the S. Robert Davis Chair in The Ohio State College of Medicine. Dr. Kiecolt-Glaser is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine (now known as the National Academy of Medicine) and a Fellow in both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. She has served on the editorial boards of eleven journals, and she received the Award for Outstanding Contributions to Health Psychology twice. The Institute for Scientific Information rates her in the top half of the top one percent of the world’s most highly cited publishing researchers. Dr. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, Director of The Ohio State Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, comments: “In our prior marital studies, we have shown that marital discord promotes inflammation. Our research has shown that chronically abrasive marital relationships heighten production of epinephrine and norepinephrine -- stress hormones that stimulate the growth of many enteric bacteria -- and heighten inflammation. Recently, we found that men and women whose marital discussions were more hostile and who also had a mood disorder history had lower resting energy expenditure, higher insulin, and higher peak triglyceride responses than other participants following high-fat meals. The welcome support of uBiome will enable us, for the first time, to explore these effects across a relatively large sample of married couples.” Dr. Jessica Richman, co-founder and CEO of uBiome, says: “Dr. Kiecolt-Glaser’s study is evidence of the way in which the microbiome impacts many aspects of human life. We are eager to learn more about the impact of the stress on gut bacteria, and the resulting effect of this on physical health.” Dr. Zachary Apte, co-founder and CTO of uBiome, and Adjunct Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco, adds: “We’re excited to support such a study, spanning psychology, microbiology, and genomics and to learn more about the impact of mental health on the microbiome.” Founded in 2012, uBiome is the world’s leading microbial genomics company. uBiome is funded by Y Combinator, Andreessen Horowitz, 8VC, and other leading investors. uBiome’s mission is to explore important research questions about the microbiome and to develop accurate and reliable clinical tests based on the microbiome.


Dinis S.,University of Porto | Dinis S.,Hospital Of Sao Joao | de Oliveira J.T.,ULHT | de Oliveira J.T.,University of Porto | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Women's Health | Year: 2015

Interstitial cystitis, presently known as bladder pain syndrome, has been recognized for over a century but is still far from being understood. Its etiology is unknown and the syndrome probably harbors different diseases. Autoimmune dysfunction, urothelial leakage, infection, central and peripheral nervous system dysfunction, genetic disease, childhood trauma/abuse, and subsequent stress response system dysregulation might be implicated. Management is slowly evolving from a solo act by the end-organ specialist to a team approach based on new typing and phenotyping of the disease. However, oral and invasive treatments are still largely aimed at the bladder and are based on currently proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Future research will better define the disease, permitting individualization of treatment. © 2015 Dinis et al.


Ni X.,Nanjing Southeast University | Luo J.,Nanjing Southeast University | Zhang B.,The Ohio State University | Teng J.,The Ohio State University | And 3 more authors.
Security and Communication Networks | Year: 2016

Location-related mobile social network services are popular nowadays, and their methods to obtain end users’ location information are based on people's self-report location claims, using mobile devices to check positions and send them back to the service providers. However, this mechanism has a serious vulnerability that makes malicious users be able to access restricted resource by transmitting fake locations. Both academic and industrial researchers are recently aware of this problem's importance since the commercialized trend of location-related mobile social network services. To address this issue, we propose mobile phone-based physical-social location, a mobile phone-based location proof system to verify users’ location claims and defend various fake location information. Our core idea is that a user's location claim can be proved by a set of selective physical encountered people serving as “witnesses” who are co-located with him/her in that area. The system is composed of proof generation and verification. In the proof generation phase, we leverage a certain number of co-located people to generate certificates as location proofs during their encounters via bluetooth interface. In the verification phase, we propose an efficient verification scheme to make our system accurate and adaptive. We have implemented the MPSL system using real world Nokia N82 (Nokia, Espoo, Finland) phones. Our experimental results show that our mobile phone-based system can achieve high verification accuracy and good performance. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Gao F.,Chongqing University | Li S.E.,Tsinghua University | Kum D.,Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology | Zhang H.,The Ohio State University
Neurocomputing | Year: 2015

The switching based control is an effective way to handle systems with large and fast varying uncertainties. Many conventional methods, however, do not use robust controllers to stabilize each model, and thus need a large number of controllers to ensure the stability of systems with large uncertainties. Under the structure of supervisory control, this paper presents a robust multiple model switching control (RMMSC) method using H∞ control for MIMO linear systems with large parametric uncertainty. The proposed method uses H∞ controller to maximize the stability region of each model with uncertainties, and thus to significantly reduce the number of candidate controllers. The candidate controllers are designed by using linear matrix inequality (LMI), and an exponentially decaying switch index is proposed to select the proper controller by estimating the system norm of each model uncertainty. Using such switch index, the closed-loop control system is then equivalent to a switching system with smaller uncertainty whose system norm can be predefined by designers. The robust stability under arbitrary switching conditions is proven by the small gain theorem; and for slow switching conditions, the acceptable dwell time for stability is analyzed and presented. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated with the second order inertial system with large model uncertainties. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Koay J.Y.,Copenhagen University | Vestergaard M.,Copenhagen University | Vestergaard M.,University of Arizona | Casasola V.,National institute for astrophysics | And 2 more authors.
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society | Year: 2016

We investigate if the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of Mrk 590, whose supermassive black hole was until recently highly accreting, is turning off due to a lack of central gas to fuel it.We analyse new subarcsecond resolution Atacama Large Millimetre/submilllimetre Array maps of the 12CO(3-2) line and 344 GHz continuum emission in Mrk 590.We detect no 12CO(3-2) emission in the inner 150 pc, constraining the central molecular gas mass to M(H2) ≲ 1.6 × 105M⊙, no more than a typical giant molecular gas cloud, for a CO luminosity to gas mass conversion factor of αCO ~ 0.8M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1. However, there is still potentially enough gas to fuel the black hole for another 2.6 × 105 yr assuming Eddington-limited accretion. We therefore cannot rule out that the AGN may just be experiencing a temporary feeding break, and may turn on again in the near future. We discover a ring-like structure at a radius of ~1 kpc, where a gas clump exhibiting disturbed kinematics and located just ~200 pc west of the AGN, may be refuelling the centre. Mrk 590 does not have significantly less gas than other nearby AGN host galaxies at kpc scales, confirming that gas reservoirs at these scales provide no direct indication of on-going AGN activity and accretion rates. Continuum emission detected in the central 150 pc likely originates from warm AGN-heated dust, although contributions from synchrotron and free-free emission cannot be ruled out. © 2015 The Authors.


Baral N.R.,The Ohio State University | Baral N.R.,Tribhuvan University | Wituszynski D.M.,The Ohio State University | Martin J.F.,The Ohio State University | Shah A.,The Ohio State University
Energy | Year: 2016

Energy can be recovered from stillage from cellulosic biorefineries in different ways, including direct combustion and fast pyrolysis. These different energy conversion routes require different level of inputs from natural resources, non-renewable resources, and economic services. Due to the high energetic and economic costs of stillage recovery methods, it is essential to perform a sustainability analysis of these different options before commercial deployment. Thus, the main objective of this study was to assess the relative sustainability and environmental impact of fast pyrolysis and direct combustion systems for the beneficial use of waste stillage using emergy analysis. The estimated emergy sustainability indices of direct combustion and fast pyrolysis were 0.09 and 0.07, respectively, where the renewable fraction of stillage was the most influential input parameter. Additionally, the net product transformity for direct combustion and fast pyrolysis were 7.06E+05 and 2.61E+05 seJ/J, respectively. Overall, a 23% higher emergy sustainability index for the direct combustion compared to the fast pyrolysis and a 63% lower overall product transformity for the fast pyrolysis compared to the direct combustion suggests that both systems, at the current state of the technology, offer differing advantages for stillage utilization depending upon the desired end products and uses. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


Scharpf D.T.,The Ohio State University | Sharma M.,The Ohio State University | Deogaonkar M.,The Ohio State University | Rezai A.,The Ohio State University | Bergese S.D.,The Ohio State University
Korean Journal of Anesthesiology | Year: 2015

The field of functional neurosurgery has expanded in last decade to include newer indications, new devices, and new methods. This advancement has challenged anesthesia providers to adapt to these new requirements. This review aims to discuss the nuances and practical issues that are faced while administering anesthesia for deep brain stimulation surgery. © The Korean Society of Anesthesiologists, 2015.


Chuang C.-H.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Chuang C.-H.,Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam | Prada F.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Prada F.,Institute Astrofisica Of Andalucia Csic | And 35 more authors.
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society | Year: 2016

With the largest spectroscopic galaxy survey volume drawn from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we can extract cosmological constraints from the measurements of redshift and geometric distortions at quasi-linear scales (e.g. above 50 h-1 Mpc). We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS galaxy sample, at the effective redshift z = 0.59, to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular- diameter distance DA(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)σ8(z), and the physical matter density Ωm h2.We obtain robust measurements by including a polynomial as the model for the systematic errors, and find it works very well against the systematic effects, e.g. ones induced by stars and seeing. We provide accurate measurements (DA(0.59)rs,fid/rs, H(0.59)rs/rs,fid, f(0.59)σ8(0.59), Ωm h2) = (1427 ± 26 Mpc, 97.3 ± 3.3 kms-1 Mpc-1, 0.488 ± 0.060, 0.135 ± 0.016), where rs is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and rs,fid = 147.66 Mpc is the sound scale of the fiducial cosmology used in this study. The parameters which are not well constrained by our galaxy clustering analysis are marginalized over with wide flat priors. Since no priors from other data sets, e.g. cosmic microwave background (CMB), are adopted and no dark energy models are assumed, our results from BOSS CMASS galaxy clustering alone may be combined with other data sets, i.e. CMB, SNe, lensing or other galaxy clustering data to constrain the parameters of a given cosmological model. The uncertainty on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, from CMB+CMASS is about 8 per cent. The uncertainty on the curvature fraction, Ωk, is 0.3 per cent. We do not find deviation from flat ΛCDM. © 2016 The Authors.


Koay J.Y.,Copenhagen University | Vestergaard M.,Copenhagen University | Vestergaard M.,University of Arizona | Bignall H.E.,CSIRO | And 2 more authors.
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society | Year: 2016

We investigate the origin of the parsec-scale radio emission from the changing-look active galactic nucleus (AGN) of Mrk 590, and examine whether the radio power has faded concurrently with the dramatic decrease in accretion rates observed between the 1990s and the present. We detect a compact core at 1.6 and 8.4 GHz using new Very Long Baseline Array observations, finding no significant extended, jet-like features down to ~1 pc scales. The flat spectral index (α8.4 1.6 = 0.03) and high brightness temperature (Tb ~ 108 K) indicate self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the AGN. The radio to X-ray luminosity ratio of log(LR/LX) ~ -5, similar to that in coronally active stars, suggests emission from magnetized coronal winds, although unresolved radio jets are also consistent with the data. Comparing new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array measurements with archival and published radio flux densities, we find 46 per cent, 34 per cent, and (insignificantly) 13 per cent flux density decreases between the 1990s and the year 2015 at 1.4 GHz, 5 GHz and 8.4 GHz, respectively. This trend, possibly due to the expansion and fading of internal shocks within the radio-emitting outflow after a recent outburst, is consistent with the decline of the optical-UV and X-ray luminosities over the same period. Such correlated variability demonstrates the AGN accretion-outflow connection, confirming that the changing-look behaviour in Mrk 590 originates from variable accretion rates rather than dust obscuration. The present radio and X-ray luminosity correlation, consistent with low/hard state accretion, suggests that the black hole may now be accreting in a radiatively inefficient mode. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society.


Gunn J.S.,The Ohio State University | Marshall J.M.,The Ohio State University | Baker S.,University of Oxford | Baker S.,London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine | And 5 more authors.
Trends in Microbiology | Year: 2014

Typhoid (enteric fever) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing over 21 million new infections annually, with the majority of deaths occurring in young children. Because typhoid fever-causing Salmonella have no known environmental reservoir, the chronic, asymptomatic carrier state is thought to be a key feature of continued maintenance of the bacterium within human populations. Despite the importance of this disease to public health, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that catalyze carriage, as well as our ability to reliably identify and treat the Salmonella carrier state, have only recently begun to advance. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Jia R.,University of Miami | Lang S.N.,The Ohio State University | Schoppe-Sullivan S.J.,The Ohio State University
Psychological Assessment | Year: 2016

Accurate assessment of psychological self-concept in early childhood relies on the development of psychometrically sound instruments. From a developmental perspective, the current study revised an existing measure of young children's psychological self-concepts, the Child Self-View Questionnaire (CSVQ; Eder, 1990), and examined its psychometric properties using a sample of preschool-age children assessed at approximately 4 years old with a follow-up at age 5 (N = 111). The item compositions of lower order dimensions were revised, leading to improved internal consistency. Factor analysis revealed 3 latent psychological self-concept factors (i.e., sociability, control, and assurance) from the lower order dimensions. Measurement invariance by gender was supported for sociability and assurance, not for control. Test-retest reliability was supported by stability of the psychological self-concept measurement model during the preschool years, although some evidence of increasing differentiation was obtained. Validity of children's scores on the 3 latent psychological self-concept factors was tested by investigating their concurrent associations with teacher-reported behavioral adjustment on the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation Scale-Short Form (SCBE-SF; LaFreniere & Dumas, 1996). Children who perceived themselves as higher in sociability at 5 years old displayed less internalizing behavior and more social competence; boys who perceived themselves as higher in control at age 4 exhibited lower externalizing behavior; children higher in assurance had greater social competence at age 4, but displayed more externalizing behavior at age 5. Implications relevant to the utility of the revised psychological self-concept measure are discussed. © 2015 American Psychological Association.


Broome M.R.,Veterinary Medical Imaging | Peterson M.E.,Animal Endocrine Clinic | Kemppainen R.J.,Auburn University | Parker V.J.,The Ohio State University | Richter K.P.,Veterinary Specialty Hospital
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association | Year: 2015

Objective-To describe findings in dogs with exogenous thyrotoxicosis attributable to consumption of commercially available dog foods or treats containing high concentrations of thyroid hormone.Design-Retrospective and prospective case series.Animals-14 dogs.Procedures-Medical records were retrospectively searched to identify dogs with exogenous thyrotoxicosis attributable to dietary intake. One case was found, and subsequent cases were identified prospectively. Serum thyroid hormone concentrations were evaluated before and after feeding meat-based products suspected to contain excessive thyroid hormone was discontinued. Scintigraphy was performed to evaluate thyroid tissue in 13 of 14 dogs before and 1 of 13 dogs after discontinuation of suspect foods or treats. Seven samples of 5 commercially available products fed to 6 affected dogs were analyzed for thyroxine concentration; results were subjectively compared with findings for 10 other commercial foods and 6 beef muscle or liver samples.Results-Total serum thyroxine concentrations were high (median, 8.8 μg/dL; range, 4.65 to 17.4 μg/dL) in all dogs at initial evaluation; scintigraphy revealed subjectively decreased thyroid gland radionuclide in 13 of 13 dogs examined. At μ 4 weeks after feeding of suspect food or treats was discontinued, total thyroxine concentrations were within the reference range for all dogs and signs associated with thyrotoxicosis, if present, had resolved. Analy- sis of tested food or treat samples revealed a median thyroxine concentration for suspect products of 1.52 μg of thyroxine/g, whereas that of unrelated commercial foods was 0.38 μg of thyroxine/g.Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that thyrotoxicosis can occur secondary to consumption of meat-based products presumably contaminated by thyroid tissue, and can be reversed by identification and elimination of suspect products from the diet. © 2015, American Veterinary Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Seo H.-J.,Ohio University | Beutler F.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Ross A.J.,The Ohio State University | Ross A.J.,University of Portsmouth | Saito S.,University of Tokyo
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society | Year: 2016

The density field reconstruction technique, which partially reverses the non-linear degradation of the Baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the galaxy redshift surveys, has been successful in substantially improving the cosmology constraints from recent surveys such as Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We estimate the efficiency of the method as a function of various reconstruction details. To directly quantify the BAO information in non-linear density fields before and after reconstruction, we calculate the cross-correlations (i.e. propagators) of the pre(post)-reconstructed density field with the initial linear field using a mock sample that mimics the clustering of the BOSS galaxies. The results directly provide the BAO damping as a function of wavenumber that can be implemented into the Fisher matrix analysis. We focus on investigating the dependence of the propagator on a choice of smoothing filters and on two major different conventions of the redshift-space density field reconstruction that have been used in literature. By estimating the BAO signal to noise for each case, we predict constraints on the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter using the Fisher matrix analysis. We thus determine an optimal Gaussian smoothing filter scale for the signal-to-noise level of the BOSS CMASS. We also present appropriate BAO fitting models for different reconstruction methods based on the first- and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory in Fourier space. Using the mock data, we show that the modified BAO fitting model can substantially improve the accuracy of the BAO position in the best fits as well as the goodness of the fits. © 2016 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.


Seo H.-J.,The Ohio State University | Seo H.-J.,Ohio University | Hirata C.M.,The Ohio State University
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society | Year: 2016

Redshifted HI 21 cm emission from unresolved low-redshift large-scale structure is a promising window for ground-based baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) observations. A major challenge for this method is separating the cosmic signal from the foregrounds of Galactic and extra-Galactic origins that are stronger by many orders of magnitude than the former. The smooth frequency spectrum expected for the foregrounds would nominally contaminate only very small k|| modes; however, the chromatic response of the telescope antenna pattern at this wavelength to the foreground introduces non-smooth structure, pervasively contaminating the cosmic signal over the physical scales of our interest. Such contamination defines a wedged volume in Fourier space around the transverse modes that is inaccessible for the cosmic signal. In this paper, we test the effect of this contaminated wedge on the future 21-cm BAO surveys using Fisher information matrix calculation. We include the signal improvement due to the BAO reconstruction technique that has been used for galaxy surveys and test the effect of this wedge on the BAO reconstruction as a function of signal to noises and incorporate the results in the Fisher matrix calculation. We find that the wedge effect expected at z = 1-2 is very detrimental to the angular diameter distances: the errors on angular diameter distances increased by 3-4.4 times, while the errors onH(z) increased by a factor of 1.5-1.6. We conclude that calibration techniques that clean out the foreground 'wedge' would be extremely valuable for constraining angular diameter distances from intensity-mapping 21-cm surveys. © 2016 The Authors.


Bhardwaj S.,The Ohio State University | Nahar N.K.,The Ohio State University | Volakis J.L.,The Ohio State University
IET Microwaves, Antennas and Propagation | Year: 2014

The authors present concentrically arrayed radial line slot array antenna for operation at 106 GHz. For compact design, they propose a vertical waveguide feeding with a cross-slot structure at the waveguide to cavity transition. Aperture design and optimisation are carried out using particle swarm optimisation with the goal to minimise the cross-polarised radiation. Antenna prototypes were fabricated using a slotted plate with nickel and radial line cavity with copper. Fabricated aperture showed 72% peak radiation efficiency at 106.3 GHz with a gain bandwidth of 8.5% and 3-dB axial ratio bandwidth of 18%. © The Institution of Engineering and Technology 2015.

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