Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion

Ottawa, Canada

Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion

Ottawa, Canada

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PubMed | Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Branch and Bureau of Nutritional science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Health reports | Year: 2015

A surveillance tool was developed to assess dietary intake collected by surveys in relation to Eating Well with Canadas Food Guide (CFG). The tool classifies foods in the Canadian Nutrient File (CNF) according to how closely they reflect CFG. This paper describes the validation exercise conducted to ensure that CNF foods determined to be in line with CFG were appropriately classified.With statistical modelling, 8,000 simulated diets (500 for each of the 16 Dietary Reference Intake [DRI] age/sex groups) were generated using commonly consumed foods classified as in line with CFG. Criteria for assessing the energy content and nutrient distributions of the simulated diets were based on factors considered in the development of CFG, including Estimated Energy Requirement (EER) and Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) values.The median energy content of the simulated diets was at or below reference EERs. Most age/sex group distributions had macronutrient profiles that met the assessment criterion of 80% of the distribution within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range, and almost all age/sex group distributions had a low prevalence (less than 10%) of micronutrient profiles below the Estimated Average Requirements. Overall, the findings indicate that diets consisting of foods that are commonly consumed by Canadians and that are in line with CFG have a low probability of energy excess and nutrient inadequacy.The classification of foods in the CNF accurately reflects CFG recommendations and can be used to assess surveillance data.


Colapinto C.K.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion | Ellis A.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion | Faloon-Drew K.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion | Lowell H.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior | Year: 2016

Formulating dietary guidance involves navigating a large volume of substantive, conflicting evidence. Canada's guidance is determined after periodic evidence reviews. Health Canada identified the need for a more formal and systematic process to gather, assess, and analyze evidence. This led to the development of the Evidence Review Cycle model for Canada's dietary guidance. The Evidence Review Cycle consists of 5 steps that form a dynamic, iterative process to promote evidence-based, transparent, and proactive decision making. Resulting actions may include enhancing the implementation of guidance, revising guidance, or developing new guidance. Here, the development of this model is described, including considerations for implementation. © 2016.


Gilbert J.-A.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion | Miller D.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion | Olson S.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion | St-Pierre S.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Canadian Journal of Public Health | Year: 2012

Objectives: The article describes the after-school (AS) snacking pattern of young Canadians and its relationship with the amount of energy consumed daily and at dinner. Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional dietary data, measured by 24h recall, from 9,131 children and adolescents aged 4 to 18 years from the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 2.2 (2004). We evaluated AS snack intake; i.e., foods consumed Monday to Friday between 3:00 and 6:00 pm, excluding lunch and dinner. We also assessed the consumption frequency of AS snack items, the energy provided by AS snacks and total daily energy intake (TDEI) by age group and sex. Results: Approximately 63% of respondents consumed AS snacks. AS snacks provided on average 1212[95%CI,1157-1268]kJ (290[95%CI,276- 303]kcal), representing 13[95%CI,12-13]% of TDEI. Youth who consumed AS snacks contributing 1-418 kJ (1-99 kcal) reported lower TDEI than those who consumed no snack. Among AS snack consumers, TDEI was higher in groups consuming the highest amount of energy from AS snacks. Fruits were among the most frequently consumed food categories. However, the largest energy contributors were mostly foods that may be energy-dense and nutrient-poor, such as cookies, sugar-sweetened beverages and sweets. Conclusion: Considering that the majority of children and adolescents consumed AS snacks, that these snacks provided about 13% of their TDEI, and that the majority of the most frequently consumed snacks were generally energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, the AS time period presents an opportunity to promote healthy eating in order to improve diet quality and potentially influence TDEI among Canadian children and adolescents. © Canadian Public Health Association, 2012.


Munene L.E.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion | Dumais L.,Food Directorate at Health Canada | Esslinger K.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion | Jones-Mclean E.,Social Determinants and Science Integration Directorate at the Public Health Agency of Canada | And 5 more authors.
Health Reports | Year: 2015

Background: A surveillance tool was developed to assess dietary intake collected by surveys in relation to Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide (CFG). The tool classifies foods in the Canadian Nutrient File (CNF) according to how closely they reflect CFG. This paper describes the validation exercise conducted to ensure that CNF foods determined to be "in line with CFG" were appropriately classified. Methods: With statistical modelling, 8,000 simulated diets (500 for each of the 16 Dietary Reference Intake [DRI] age/sex groups) were generated using commonly consumed foods classified as "in line with CFG." Criteria for assessing the energy content and nutrient distributions of the simulated diets were based on factors considered in the development of CFG, including Estimated Energy Requirement (EER) and Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) values. Results: The median energy content of the simulated diets was at or below reference EERs. Most age/sex group distributions had macronutrient profiles that met the assessment criterion of 80% of the distribution within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range, and almost all age/sex group distributions had a low prevalence (less than 10%) of micronutrient profiles below the Estimated Average Requirements. Overall, the findings indicate that diets consisting of foods that are commonly consumed by Canadians and that are "in line with CFG" have a low probability of energy excess and nutrient inadequacy. Interpretation: The classification of foods in the CNF accurately reflects CFG recommendations and can be used to assess surveillance data. © Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, 2015.


Lowell H.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Health reports / Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information = Rapports sur la santé / Statistique Canada, Centre canadien d'information sur la santé | Year: 2010

The 2006 Maternity Experiences Survey provides information about women's weight before, during and after pregnancy. Using these data, this study assessed Canadian women's adherence to the 1999 gestational weight gain guidelines. Women with a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index were more likely than normal or underweight women to gain more than recommended. Compared with older mothers, a higher percentage of young mothers gained more than recommended. Women who gave birth for the first time were more likely than those who had had more than one birth to gain more than recommended. A lower level of education was associated with weight gain exceeding the recommendations. Aboriginal women were more likely than non-Aboriginal women to gain more than recommended. Women who gained more than recommended while they were pregnant retained more weight five to nine months postpartum, compared with those who gained less than or within the amount recommended.


Langlois K.,Health Analysis Division | Colapinto C.K.,Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Health Reports | Year: 2016

Background: Although vitamin C is not produced in the body, it is important for many biochemical and physiological functions. Little is known about the current vitamin C status of Canadians. This study describes the correlates of vitamin C status in a nationally representative sample of adults. Data and methods: Data are from the 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Plasma vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) concentrations were measured among a fasting subsample of respondents aged 20 to 79 (n = 1,615). Vitamin C status, prevalence of deficiency (plasma vitamin C < 11 μmol/L), and use of vitamin C-containing supplements were estimated. Multivariate regression models were used to examine associations between vitamin C status and sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, body mass index, supplement use, and consumption of fruit juice and citrus fruit. Results: The mean plasma vitamin C concentration of adults aged 20 to 79 was 53 μmol/L; fewer than 3% were vitamin C-deficient. Almost 22% took a vitamin C-containing supplement. Concentrations were lower among smokers and people who were obese, and higher among vitamin C supplement users and fruit juice and citrus fruit consumers. Multivariate models showed that supplement use was the strongest and most consistent predictor of vitamin C status; fruit juice and citrus fruit consumption were predictors only among populations with lower vitamin C concentrations (for example, smokers, obese). Interpretation: Few Canadians were vitamin C-deficient. Smokers and people with a higher BMI were most at risk of lower vitamin C concentrations; concentrations were higher among supplement users and consumers of fruit juice and citrus fruit. © Minister of Industry, 2016.


PubMed | Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Health reports | Year: 2010

The 2006 Maternity Experiences Survey provides information about womens weight before, during and after pregnancy. Using these data, this study assessed Canadian womens adherence to the 1999 gestational weight gain guidelines. Women with a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index were more likely than normal or underweight women to gain more than recommended. Compared with older mothers, a higher percentage of young mothers gained more than recommended. Women who gave birth for the first time were more likely than those who had had more than one birth to gain more than recommended. A lower level of education was associated with weight gain exceeding the recommendations. Aboriginal women were more likely than non-Aboriginal women to gain more than recommended. Women who gained more than recommended while they were pregnant retained more weight five to nine months postpartum, compared with those who gained less than or within the amount recommended.


PubMed | Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of nutrition education and behavior | Year: 2016

Formulating dietary guidance involves navigating a large volume of substantive, conflicting evidence. Canadas guidance is determined after periodic evidence reviews. Health Canada identified the need for a more formal and systematic process to gather, assess, and analyze evidence. This led to the development of the Evidence Review Cycle model for Canadas dietary guidance. The Evidence Review Cycle consists of 5 steps that form a dynamic, iterative process to promote evidence-based, transparent, and proactive decision making. Resulting actions may include enhancing the implementation of guidance, revising guidance, or developing new guidance. Here, the development of this model is described, including considerations for implementation.


PubMed | Health Analysis Division, Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion and Food Directorate
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Health reports | Year: 2016

Although vitamin C is not produced in the body, it is important for many biochemical and physiological functions. Little is known about the current vitamin C status of Canadians. This study describes the correlates of vitamin C status in a nationally representative sample of adults.Data are from the 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Plasma vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) concentrations were measured among a fasting subsample of respondents aged 20 to 79 (n = 1,615). Vitamin C status, prevalence of deficiency (plasma vitamin C < 11 mol/L), and use of vitamin C-containing supplements were estimated. Multivariate regression models were used to examine associations between vitamin C status and sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, body mass index, supplement use, and consumption of fruit juice and citrus fruit.The mean plasma vitamin C concentration of adults aged 20 to 79 was 53 mol/L; fewer than 3% were vitamin C-deficient. Almost 22% took a vitamin C-containing supplement. Concentrations were lower among smokers and people who were obese, and higher among vitamin C supplement users and fruit juice and citrus fruit consumers. Multivariate models showed that supplement use was the strongest and most consistent predictor of vitamin C status; fruit juice and citrus fruit consumption were predictors only among populations with lower vitamin C concentrations (for example, smokers, obese).Few Canadians were vitamin C-deficient. Smokers and people with a higher BMI were most at risk of lower vitamin C concentrations; concentrations were higher among supplement users and consumers of fruit juice and citrus fruit.


PubMed | Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Canadian journal of public health = Revue canadienne de sante publique | Year: 2013

The article describes the after-school (AS) snacking pattern of young Canadians and its relationship with the amount of energy consumed daily and at dinner.We analyzed cross-sectional dietary data, measured by 24h recall, from 9,131 children and adolescents aged 4 to 18 years from the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 2.2 (2004). We evaluated AS snack intake; i.e., foods consumed Monday to Friday between 3:00 and 6:00 pm, excluding lunch and dinner. We also assessed the consumption frequency of AS snack items, the energy provided by AS snacks and total daily energy intake (TDEI) by age group and sex.Approximately 63% of respondents consumed AS snacks. AS snacks provided on average 1212[95%CI,1157-1268] kJ (290[95%CI,276-303] kcal), representing 13[95%CI,12-13]% of TDEI. Youth who consumed AS snacks contributing 1-418 kJ (1-99 kcal) reported lower TDEI than those who consumed no snack. Among AS snack consumers, TDEI was higher in groups consuming the highest amount of energy from AS snacks. Fruits were among the most frequently consumed food categories. However, the largest energy contributors were mostly foods that may be energy-dense and nutrient-poor, such as cookies, sugar-sweetened beverages and sweets.Considering that the majority of children and adolescents consumed AS snacks, that these snacks provided about 13% of their TDEI, and that the majority of the most frequently consumed snacks were generally energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, the AS time period presents an opportunity to promote healthy eating in order to improve diet quality and potentially influence TDEI among Canadian children and adolescents.

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