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Boers D.,Office of Environmental Health and Safety | Geelen L.,Office of Environmental Health and Safety | Erbrink H.,DNV GL | Smit L.A.M.,Institute for Risk Assessment science | And 5 more authors.
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health | Year: 2016

Purpose: Odor annoyance is an important environmental stressor for neighboring residents of livestock farms and may affect their quality of life and health. However, little is known about the relation between odor exposure due to livestock farming and odor annoyance. Even more, the relation between odor exposure and odor annoyance is rather complicated due to variable responses among individuals to comparable exposure levels and a large number of factors (such as age, gender, education) that may affect the relation. In this study, we (1) investigated the relation between modeled odor exposure and odor annoyance; (2) investigated whether other factors can affect this relation; and (3) compared our dose–response relation to a dose–response relation established in a previous study carried out in the Netherlands, more than 10 years ago, in order to investigate changes in odor perception and appreciation over time. Methods: We used data from 582 respondents who participated in a questionnaire survey among neighboring residents of livestock farms in the south of the Netherlands. Odor annoyance was established by two close-ended questions in a questionnaire; odor exposure was estimated using the Stacks dispersion model. Results: The results of our study indicate a statistically significant and positive relation between modeled odor exposure and reported odor annoyance from livestock farming (OR 1.92; 95 % CI 1.53–2.41). Furthermore, age, asthma, education and perceived air pollution in the environment are all related to odor annoyance, although they hardly affect the relation between estimated livestock odor exposure and reported odor annoyance. We also found relatively more odor annoyance reported among neighboring residents than in a previous study conducted in the Netherlands. Conclusions: We found a strong relation between modeled odor exposure and odor annoyance. However, due to some uncertainties and small number of studies on this topic, further research and replication of results is recommended. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Risk Assessment science, Office of Environmental Health and Safety, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research and DNV GL
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International archives of occupational and environmental health | Year: 2016

Odor annoyance is an important environmental stressor for neighboring residents of livestock farms and may affect their quality of life and health. However, little is known about the relation between odor exposure due to livestock farming and odor annoyance. Even more, the relation between odor exposure and odor annoyance is rather complicated due to variable responses among individuals to comparable exposure levels and a large number of factors (such as age, gender, education) that may affect the relation. In this study, we (1) investigated the relation between modeled odor exposure and odor annoyance; (2) investigated whether other factors can affect this relation; and (3) compared our dose-response relation to a dose-response relation established in a previous study carried out in the Netherlands, more than 10 years ago, in order to investigate changes in odor perception and appreciation over time.We used data from 582 respondents who participated in a questionnaire survey among neighboring residents of livestock farms in the south of the Netherlands. Odor annoyance was established by two close-ended questions in a questionnaire; odor exposure was estimated using the Stacks dispersion model.The results of our study indicate a statistically significant and positive relation between modeled odor exposure and reported odor annoyance from livestock farming (OR 1.92; 95 % CI 1.53-2.41). Furthermore, age, asthma, education and perceived air pollution in the environment are all related to odor annoyance, although they hardly affect the relation between estimated livestock odor exposure and reported odor annoyance. We also found relatively more odor annoyance reported among neighboring residents than in a previous study conducted in the Netherlands.We found a strong relation between modeled odor exposure and odor annoyance. However, due to some uncertainties and small number of studies on this topic, further research and replication of results is recommended.


Geelen L.M.J.,Office of Environmental Health and Safety | Geelen L.M.J.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Huijbregts M.A.J.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Jans H.W.A.,Office of Environmental Health and Safety | And 3 more authors.
Atmospheric Environment | Year: 2013

For policy-making, human health risks of fine particulate m(PM2.5) are commonly assessed by comparing environmental concentrations with reference values, which does not necessarily reflect the impact on health in a population. The goal of this study was to compare health impacts in the Moerdijk area, The Netherlands resulting from local emissions of PM2.5 from industry and traffic in a case study using the risk advancement period (RAP) of mortality. The application of the RAP methodology on the local scale is a promising technique to quantify potential health impacts for communication purposes. The risk advancement period of mortality is the time period by which the mortality risk is advanced among exposed individuals conditional on survival at a baseline age. The RAP showed that road traffic was the most important local emission source that affects human health in the study area, whereas the estimated health impact from industry was a factor of 3 lower. PM2.5 due to highway-traffic was the largest contributor to the health impact of road traffic. This finding is in contrast with the risk perception in this area. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Geelen L.M.J.,Office of Environmental Health and Safety | Geelen L.M.J.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Souren A.F.M.M.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Jans H.W.A.,Office of Environmental Health and Safety | And 2 more authors.
Human and Ecological Risk Assessment | Year: 2013

The aim of the present study was to compare the perceived risks of air pollution from industry and traffic in the Moerdijk region in The Netherlands, and to identify the demographic and psychometric variables that are associated with these perceived risks. We sent out a questionnaire and risk perceptions were explored using multiple regression models. The results showed that the perceived risks of industrial air pollution were higher than for those of traffic-related air pollution. The perceived risk of industrial air pollution was associated with other variables than that of traffic. For industry, the psychometric variable affect prevailed. For traffic-related air pollution, the demographic variables age and educational level prevailed, although affect was also apparent. Which source was considered as the major source-traffic or industry-depended on a high risk perception of industrial air pollution, and not on variation in risk perception of traffic-related air pollution. These insights can be used as an impetus for the local risk management process in the Moerdijk region. We recommend that local authorities consider risk perception as one of the targets in local risk management strategies as well. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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