Office of Cancer Survivorship

Anderson, United States

Office of Cancer Survivorship

Anderson, United States

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Queens Medical Associates Founder and President Dr. Barry Kaplan was tapped to speak at the Survivorship Summit: A New Standard of Cancer Care event recently held at NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens in Flushing, New York. Dr. Kaplan discussed the broader importance of survivorship care to a group of 100 attendees from a variety of medical disciplines, including oncology, primary care, social services, and nursing. Queens Medical Associates is a physician practice specializing in hematology and oncology and is an early adopter and leader in survivorship care plans. Dr. Kaplan is a well-known expert in medical oncology, with over four decades of experience in clinical medicine and academia. He was joined by a panel of experts including Dr. Julia H. Rowland, Director, Office of Cancer Survivorship at the National Cancer Institute. The panel explored the importance and impact of strong survivorship programs. “Too many cancer care facilities around the country overlook or underinvest in survivorship programs,” Dr. Kaplan said. “But they should, in fact, be applying the same level of rigor and expertise to survivorship care as they do to all other elements of treatment.” Dr. Rowland stressed the need for a comprehensive approach that includes continued support services and communication between doctors: “Survivorship planning is a conversation. If we make it a piece of paper, we will fail.” She also noted that, according to the Commission of Cancer, “survivorship care plans will need to be provided to the majority of survivors who have completed treatment for accredited organizations by the end of 2018.” From the panelist’s perspectives, mandatory survivorship care cannot come soon enough. Less than 50 percent of NCI–designated cancer centers are providing survivorship care plans to breast and colorectal cancer survivors. Queens Medical Associates has been at the forefront of survivorship care, having launched its program in 2014 to help patients navigate the long-term physical, emotional and socioeconomic tolls of their treatment. The Center takes great pride in its annual Survivors Day Celebration in June, which has been in place since 2001. Also taking part in the Survivorship Summit was Susan Dicosola, Executive Director of Queens Medical Associates. “At Queens Medical Associates, we’re strengthening our devotion to world-class survivorship care,” Dicosola said. “In the years to come, we will continue to grow our progressive set of support offerings for patients, caregivers and the microcosm of the world that is Queens.” For more information about Queens Medical Associates, visit http://www.queensmedical.com/.


Forsythe L.P.,Office of Cancer Survivorship | Forsythe L.P.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Forsythe L.P.,Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute | Parry C.,Office of Cancer Survivorship | And 10 more authors.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute | Year: 2013

Background: Survivorship care plans (SCPs), including a treatment summary and follow-up plan, intend to promote coordination of posttreatment cancer care; yet, little is known about the provision of these documents by oncologists to primary care physicians (PCPs). This study compared self-reported oncologist provision and PCP receipt of treatment summaries and follow-up plans, characterized oncologists who reported consistent provision of these documents to PCPs, and examined associations between PCP receipt of these documents and survivorship care. Methods: A nationally representative sample of medical oncologists (n = 1130) and PCPs (n = 1020) were surveyed regarding follow-up care for breast and colon cancer survivors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Multivariable regression models identified factors associated with oncologist provision of treatment summaries and SCPs to PCPs (always/almost always vs less frequent). Results: Nearly half of oncologists reported always/almost always providing treatment summaries, whereas 20.2% reported always/almost always providing SCPs (treatment summary + follow-up plan). Approximately one-third of PCPs indicated always/almost always receiving treatment summaries; 13.4% reported always/almost always receiving SCPs. Oncologists who reported training in late- and long-term effects of cancer and use of electronic medical records were more likely to report SCP provision (P <. 05). PCP receipt of SCPs was associated with better PCP-reported care coordination, physician-physician communication, and confidence in survivorship care knowledge compared to receipt of neither treatment summaries nor SCPs (P <. 05). Conclusions: Providing SCPs to PCPs may enhance survivorship care coordination, physician-physician communication, and PCP confidence. However, considerable progress will be necessary to achieve implementation of sharing SCPs among oncologists and PCPs. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press.

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