Odette Cancer and Sunnybrook Health science Center

Toronto, Canada

Odette Cancer and Sunnybrook Health science Center

Toronto, Canada
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Buckstein R.,Odette Cancer and Sunnybrook Health science Center | Kerbel R.,Sunnybrook Research Institute | Cheung M.,Odette Cancer and Sunnybrook Health science Center | Shaked Y.,Technion - Israel Institute of Technology | And 11 more authors.
Leukemia Research | Year: 2014

Metronomic, low dose chemotherapy may have anti-angiogenic effects and augment the effects of lenalidomide in MDS and CMML. We evaluated the clinical efficacy, tolerability and anti-angiogenic effects of melphalan 2. mg and lenalidomide 10. mg for 21 days/28 in CMML (n= 12) and higher risk MDS (n= 8) patients in a prospective phase II study. The primary endpoint was overall response and secondary endpoints included survival, progression-free survival, toxicity and biomarkers of angiogenesis. The median age was 73 years, 55% were pretreated and transfusion dependent. The overall response rate was 3(15%) of 19 evaluable patients but 25% in CMML and 33% in pCMML. Dose reductions and/or delays were common due to myelosuppression. Transient spikes in circulating endothelial cells that declined below baseline were seen in responders and patients with CMML, suggesting anti-angiogenic activity. In conclusion, lenalidomide and metronomic low dose melphalan demonstrate signals of clinical and possible anti-angiogenic activity in patients with pCMML that require future validation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrial.gov under # NCT00744536. © 2014 The Authors.


Abel G.A.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Efficace F.,Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases GIMEMA | Buckstein R.J.,Odette Cancer and Sunnybrook Health science Center | Tinsley S.,H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute | And 8 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2016

Disease-specific measures of quality of life can improve assessment of disease-related symptoms and psychosocial sequelae. We report on the development and validation of the Quality of Life in Myelodysplasia Scale (QUALMS), a 38-item assessment tool for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In 2014-2015, a multicenter cohort of patients with myelodysplasia completed the QUALMS, as well as the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Anemia Scale (FACT-An); a second administration was undertaken three to six months later. A total of 255 patients from the United States, Canada and Italy participated. Median age was 72 years, 56.1% were men, and the International Prognostic Scoring System distribution was 40.4% low, 42.0% intermediate-1, 13.3% intermediate-2 and 2.3% high. QUALMS scores ranged from 24 to 99 (higher scores are better), with a mean of 67.2 [standard deviation (SD)=15.2]. The measure was internally consistent (α=0.92), and moderately correlated with the multi-item QLQ-C30 scales and the FACT-An (r=-0.65 to 0.79; all P<0.001). Patients with hemoglobin of 8 g/dL or under scored lower than those with hemoglobin over 10 g/dL (61.8 vs. 71.1; P<0.001), and transfusion-dependent patients scored lower than transfusion-independent patients (62.4 vs. 69.7; P<0.01). Principal components analysis revealed “physical burden”, “benefit-finding”, and “emotional burden” subscales. There was good overall test-retest reliability among those with stable hemoglobin (r=0.81), and significant changes for patients hospitalized or with infections between administrations (both P<0.01). These data suggest the QUALMS is a valuable tool for assessing MDS-specific quality of life in the modern treatment era. © 2016 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

Loading Odette Cancer and Sunnybrook Health science Center collaborators
Loading Odette Cancer and Sunnybrook Health science Center collaborators