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News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

ODA says that the pushing out apartments in this way creates 30 percent more outdoor space than would have been available without the protrusions (Credit: Miguel de Guzmán) ODA New York has designed an unusual apartment building in Long Island City, Queens, NYC. Named 2222 Jackson, its brutalist-like pixelated design isn't purely aesthetic, but serves a practical purpose too, providing generous outdoor living space for residents in the form of terraces. Like a lot of buildings of this style, 2222 Jackson brings to mind Moshe Safdie's Habitat 67 (or even the game Minecraft if you're unfamiliar with that classic building), but the resemblance is a lot less pronounced than some other firm's projects, such as BIG's King Street West, for example. It takes the basic form of an L-shape, but with apartments pushed out at carefully-calculated points to create a total of 50 terraces. The firm says that playing around with the form of the building like this creates 30 percent more outdoor space than would have been available without the protrusions, while still meeting NYC zoning requirements. Inside, 2222 Jackson has 168,000 sq ft (15,607 sq m) of floorspace, spread over 11 floors. A total of 175 rental units come in studio apartments, and one, two, and three bedroom configurations. Each one boasts floor-to-ceiling windows and high-end appliances. 2222 Jackson is entered by an attractive triple-height lobby and amenities include an indoor pool that sports a large glazed roof for natural lighting, a residents' lounge and fitness center, and a rooftop deck that offers choice views of Manhattan's famous skyline. The project continues ODA's modus operandi of designing buildings with unusual shapes to maximize desirable features. For example, its skinny Manhattan skyscraper "stretches" to offer generous garden space and its waterfront high-rise proposal would twist significantly to offer an excellent view. "ODA rejects what would otherwise be a generic rental box, instead producing a new template for working within common zoning constraints: an axonometric structure with a uniquely articulated facade accommodating substantial outdoor areas (highly coveted though often conventionally impractical amenities in many urban environments)," says the firm in a press release.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The development of rapid diagnostic tests to identify existing and emerging diseases, such as Ebola or SARS, with the same speed and efficiency as a pregnancy test, is being hindered by lack of profile and financial barriers, suggests a joint report from a meeting organised by the Academy of Medical Sciences and the InterAcademy Partnership for Health. Such tests, which can also play a critical role in tackling antibiotic resistance, need to be prioritised by governments and funders internationally alongside drugs and vaccine development to improve global health. The report, 'Improving the development and deployment of rapid diagnostic tests in Low and Middle Income Countries', published today (20 April 2017 in the UK), summarises the conclusions of an international meeting held in London on the 21 November 2016, to discuss the growth of this technology and how rapid diagnostic tests could be accelerated to become widely adopted globally. It highlights the need for the establishment of a new international body to advocate for rapid diagnostic tests, share information and coordinate international research and development efforts. The report also proposes the creation of an Essential Diagnostics List to raise the profile of the most important diagnostics required for a functioning healthcare system, similar to the WHO Essential Medicines List. The major social and global benefits that rapid diagnostic tests can provide, such as targeting the use of antibiotics only to those who will benefit, limiting unnecessary use and delaying the development of antibiotic resistance, were stressed at the meeting. Rapid diagnostics were also described as essential for disease surveillance to support healthcare planning, to spot trends such as antibiotic resistance, and to identify, monitor and control emerging infections such as Zika virus and pandemic influenza. Professor Sanjeev Krishna, Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, who chaired the meeting, said: "Diagnostics save lives - doctors cannot treat a disease properly unless they know what it is. Rapid diagnostic tests are also essential for tackling major healthcare challenges, such as controlling emerging diseases and reducing antibiotic resistance. "We need diagnostics to move into the spotlight, taking their rightful place as a priority alongside drugs and vaccines to improve global health. Governments around the world will need to prioritise development and implementation of rapid diagnostics, while a new international body is needed to help coordinate global efforts." Financial incentives are also required to encourage companies to develop new tests, the report suggests. Rapid diagnostic tests are not always seen as being a lucrative market for big companies, while smaller companies may not have the resources to scale up production. Rapid diagnostic tests are particularly useful in countries where there are less developed healthcare systems, such as low and middle-income countries. Developing rapid diagnostic tests for these countries is challenging, because they have to be both economical and robust enough to cope with difficult environmental conditions. Professor Sanjeev Krishna, added: "Everyone has heard of a pregnancy test -- a cheap, portable and efficient handheld diagnostic. We need to see more of these types of test developed for infectious diseases and we need to see them used widely in countries with less developed healthcare systems to quickly and cheaply identify disease. "We have seen great successes with rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, HIV and TB, but we need to do more to build on this. Rapid diagnostics tests that can work in real world conditions and can be operated with minimum training could completely transform the way we treat patients, but we need the political will, financial incentive and coordination of effort to move forwards." The report summarises the conclusions of a workshop that brought together 56 experts from countries including the UK, Nigeria, Morocco, Guatemala, Uganda, Philippines, Brazil, Malaysia, Bangladesh and Trinidad and Tobago. The workshop was organised by the Academy of Medical Sciences and the InterAcademy Partnership for Health with funding from the UK Global Challenges Research Fund. To interview a spokesperson, or to request a copy of 'Improving the development and deployment of rapid diagnostic tests in Low and Middle Income Countries', please contact Giorgio De Faveri at giorgio.defaveri@acmedsci.ac.uk, +44 (0)20 3141 3206, or Claire Bithell at claire.bithell@acmedsci.ac.uk, +44 (0)20 3141 3207. 1. The Academy of Medical Sciences is the independent body in the UK representing the diversity of medical science. Our mission is to promote medical science and its translation into benefits for society. The Academy's elected Fellows are the United Kingdom's leading medical scientists from hospitals, academia, industry and the public service. We work with them to promote excellence, influence policy to improve health and wealth, nurture the next generation of medical researchers, link academia, industry and the NHS, seize international opportunities and encourage dialogue about the medical sciences. http://www. 2. The Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) is a £1.5 billion fund announced by the UK Government to support cutting-edge research that addresses the challenges faced by developing countries through: GCRF forms part of the UK's Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment, which is monitored by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). ODA-funded activities focus on outcomes that promote the long-term sustainable growth of countries on the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) list. GCRF funding is awarded in a manner that fits with Official ODA guidelines. 3. For more information on the Academy's GCRF programme of workshops please visit http://www. . 4. The InterAcademy Partnership (IAP) is an umbrella organisation that brings together three international network of academies of science and medicine: IAP for Science, IAP for Research and IAP for Health. Its more than 130 national and regional member academies, including 78 in the IAP for Health section, harness the expertise of scientific, medical and engineering leaders to advance sound policies, promote excellence in science education, improve public health and achieve other critical development goals. The InterAcademy Partnership that brought together the three original networks was formally established in March 2016. For more information, see http://www. .


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Get to know the good, the bad and the ugly of Halloween candy TORONTO, ON--(Marketwired - October 25, 2016) - Dentists realize that people love their candy and have a few hints on how to keep your teeth healthy during this time of sweet indulgences. Tooth decay does not develop from sugar alone -- It comes from poor oral health habits and letting candy sit on teeth for long periods of time. As always, make sure you and your kids brush twice a day, clean between your teeth daily and see your dentist regularly for dental exams -- and be aware of how each of these candies impact your teeth: The Good: Chocolates cause the least damage to your teeth because they dissolve quickly in your mouth. Nuts, sunflower seeds and sugarless gum are also great options. The Bad: Lollipops, jawbreakers and other hard candies take a long time to break down and can damage dental work and chip teeth. The Ugly: Sticky treats like raisins, toffee, fruit roll-ups and caramels get lodged in the teeth and that can cause decay. Sour candies are chewy and their high acid content can erode tooth enamel. "Children can enjoy the spoils of their trick-or-treating, relatively horror-free, but keep in mind that candy should be a treat, not a part of your regular diet," says Ontario Dental Association president Dr. Jack McLister. "There is sugar in other foods you eat, so for your oral health and overall body health be mindful of how much sugar you consume, especially during Halloween." Try incorporating healthy, teeth-cleaning snacks like vegetables, fruit or cheese along with the candy. It's also a good idea to have a set time for children to raid their stash of sweets instead of disbursing it throughout the day, which would let candy linger on their teeth for hours. The best "candy time" is after a meal because the saliva produced while eating will help protect their teeth. The ODA has been the voluntary professional association for dentists in Ontario since 1867. Today, we represent more than 9,000, or nine in 10, dentists across the province. The ODA is Ontario's primary source of information on oral health and the dental profession. We advocate for accessible and sustainable optimal oral health for all Ontarians by working with health-care professionals, governments, the private sector and the public. For more information on this and other helpful dental care tips, visit www.youroralhealth.ca.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AMHERST, Mass. - A new analysis by health policy researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who studied the effectiveness of the 1983 Orphan Drug Act (ODA) finds that current incentives "are not sufficiently stimulating orphan drug development" by pharmaceutical companies, and patients with rare diseases and conditions still have unmet needs. Further, barriers to ethical and timely access remain. Associate professor Rosa Rodriguez-Monguio and doctoral student Tai Spargo at UMass Amherst's School of Public Health and Health Sciences, with Enrique Seoane-Vazquez of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Boston, analyzed all orphan designations and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals since the ODA was enacted in 1983 through 2015. Details appear in a recent issue of Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. The researchers say, "Advocates are reluctant to point out any flaws based on the fear of stifling innovation, but with over 6,500 diseases needing treatment, there is evidence to suggest patients' unmet health needs remains a concern and more effective incentives have to be implemented. There is an ethical imperative of addressing patients with rare diseases access to orphan drugs." The definition of orphan drugs was expanded in 1984 to include drugs for any disease or condition affecting fewer than 200,000 people in the U.S. Today more than 6,800 rare diseases and conditions have been identified affecting an estimated 25 to 30 million Americans. Pharmaceutical companies claim that such small populations and difficulty in recovering research and development (R&D) costs contribute to a lack of alternatives for prevention and treatment of rare diseases and conditions. For this work, the researchers conducted a search of peer-reviewed papers on incentives for developing orphan drugs and the ethical dilemmas to be considered when funding research for rare diseases and conditions. Of 262 articles, they identified 24 that met study criteria. Rodriguez-Monguio acknowledge that "regulatory initiatives and R&D efforts during the past three decades resulted in the development and approval of a significant number of drugs for rare diseases and conditions." From 1983-2015, they say, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted 3,647 orphan drug designations and 554 orphan drug approvals. The approvals correspond to 438 different brand names, and 53 branded drugs had more than one orphan approval. The orphan drug approvals targeted 277 rare diseases, with cancer seeing the highest number of approvals, 32 percent of the total. Other high-approval diseases were hemophilia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Rodriguez-Monguio says this emphasis on cancer could represent a trend towards more stratified medicine or an attempt by the industry to use ODA incentives to approve oncology drugs for orphan drug indications that, once approved, are often used off-label. However, she and colleagues add, "In spite of the significant increase in the number of orphan drugs approved by the FDA since the enactment of the ODA in 1983 and the faster-than-the-economy increases in orphan drug prices, the economics of the orphan drug market remain controversial among some scholars and stakeholders." They say orphan drugs represent an increasingly important component of the U.S. pharmaceutical market and she challenges the assumption that developing orphan drugs without public support is not profitable for pharmaceutical companies. Indeed, orphan drugs can be profitable even in rare diseases with very small number of patients, she adds. Further, the R&D cost is lower for orphan drugs due to accelerated review processes that allow using surrogate endpoints in clinical trials for rare diseases. The researchers say high drug prices and a favorable reimbursement system for these drugs has brought the companies billions of dollars in revenue. Topics for more attention include that the U.S. and European Union use different methods and population thresholds to determine if a drug qualifies for orphan designation, the authors say. Also, the ethics of resource allocation for funding orphan drugs have not been agreed upon and "there is no consensus" on whether patient population is a justifiable factor in cost-effectiveness. Estimating average cost per patient or per rare disease is challenging, as well, and this average is often skewed by a few patients who require greater resources. "There is not a comprehensive moral or ethical justification for the allocation of these resources codified" by society, they note. The authors call for "a comprehensive understanding of the ethical considerations of access to safe and effective orphan drugs" as research continues and public policies are adopted that could affect patients' ability to afford treatment. Rodriguez-Monguio and colleagues suggest, "While orphan drugs improve the health status and quality of life of patients, the cost of new orphan drugs also limit patients' access to treatment. The unmet needs of patients with rare diseases and conditions suggest that the current financial incentives are not efficiently stimulating orphan drug development and marketing."


News Article | February 12, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Corruption is a curse. It stunts development, breeds conflict in fragile states, makes taxpayers in rich countries dubious about providing aid to poor countries, and gives crooked firms an advantage over those that play by the rules. Governments have become less tolerant of dirty business dealings over time, as Rolls-Royce has found to its cost. The aerospace company – one of the UK’s genuinely world class manufacturing firms – will this week announce one of Britain’s biggest ever corporate losses, in part the result of the £671m cost of settling bribery actions. The cases were brought by the authorities in Britain, Brazil and the US and involve allegations that Rolls bribed middlemen around the world between 1989 and 2013 to win contracts. Warren East, the company’s chief executive, has called the behaviour “completely unacceptable”. America has been at the forefront of the international fight against corruption ever since the passing of 1978 Foreign Corrupt Practices Act which sought to prevent multi-national corporations from bribing crooked officials in order to win contracts. There was an element of self-interest in this. The US was confident that in a fair fight its companies would win overseas contracts more often than not. Corruption simply allowed less well-managed firms to deprive US corporations of deals they would otherwise get. There has also been a recognition that the US will always be out-gunned when it comes to corruption. Despite Eisenhower’s famous warning about the influence of the military-industrial complex, the US system of governance has checks and balances that limit criminal activities. It has suited the US to present itself as the sheriff riding into town to sort out the bad hats. Up until now. Four weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency have put at risk four decades of progress in the fight against corruption and gladdened the heart of every kleptocrat around the world. What’s happened is this. Both houses of Congress have voted to gut a law that would have forced US oil, gas and mining companies to disclose their royalty, licensing and other payments to foreign governments. The law was a bipartisan initiative between Democratic Senator Ben Cardin and former Republican Senator Richard Lugar, and formed an amendment to the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act, the law designed to clean up Wall Street after the financial crisis. The Cardin-Lugar law compelled America’s financial watchdog – the Securities and Exchange Commission – to draw up tough transparency rules for energy and mining companies. Unsurprisingly, the big oil companies were strongly opposed to revealing what they were up to at such a granular level. The American Petroleum Institute, one of the biggest and best resourced lobbying groups on the planet, has opposed Cardin-Lugar from the start, but decided to play a long game. By dragging matters through the courts, the API succeeded in delaying implementation of Cardin-Lugar and as a result the new transparency rules – which would oblige companies to report annually on a project by project basis – were only due to come into force in 2019. The API’s strategy was to delay and hope that something would turn up. Now it has with Trump’s election. The new president has insisted that America has been harming itself with borders that are too porous, trade rules that are too lax, taxes that are too high, and red tape that is too onerous. He can expect the full support of his secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, the former boss of ExxonMobil, a prominent member of the API. The oil and gas lobby group has successfully portrayed Cardin-Lugar as another bit of excessive bureaucracy that will put American companies at a competitive disadvantage. Other countries will not insist on gold-plating anti-corruption rules in such a way, it has insisted. The SEC has now been told to go away and draw up new regulations because Congress says the original plan would have led to rising business costs that would have been bad for growth and jobs. This is nonsense. For a start, companies have all the information readily available and could easily adhere to the Cardin-Lugar law. The red tape argument is a red herring. But there’s a bigger point: to argue that easing up on the fight against corruption is good for business is to turn truth on its head. Corruption is actually very bad for businesses, which is why bodies such as the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development have been so active in trying to tackle it. The cost of corruption is thought to equal more than 5% of global GDP each year – about $2.6tn (£2tn) – and is estimated to raise the cost of doing business by 10% a year. The $1tn paid out in bribes is a tax that is put to no good purpose whatsoever. It builds no schools or hospitals. Corruption is particularly high in the extractives sector. The cost of private sector corruption in developing countries was above $500 bn in 2012 – representing 3.7 times the amount of global official development assistance (ODA) disbursed. Jamie Drummond, director of the campaign group, One, described the decision by Congress as a “really worrying development” that needed to be fought. “It is pro-business and pro-private sector to fight corruption,” he added. All the recent evidence is that what the US does acts as an international benchmark. In 1998, other developed countries, prodded by Washington, signed an international anti-bribery convention that mirrored the US law. What’s more, the SEC and the Department of Justice have not pussy-footed around. They have enforced the law vigorously, imposing massive fines on wrong-doers. This enforcement action has encouraged the authorities in Europe to become more vigilant. The Cardin-Lugar law is a case in point. Europe saw what the Americans were doing and brought in energy transparency and forestry legislation of its own. Following the US lead, the European parliament approved legislation similar to the energy transparency law and included forestry companies to the other natural resources firms that must comply. A number of major extractive companies have publicly supported the SEC’s rule or the very similar laws in the EU and Canada. More than 120 companies have disclosed payments worth more than $150bn in more than 100 countries under the EU’s rules to date. Now the US has signalled that it intends to be less transparent and less rigorous in fighting corruption, companies in other developed countries will get the message. European-based companies are likely to start lobbying their governments for a similar regime to that which operates in the US. Let’s be clear. Cardin-Lugar would not have ended corruption, but it did ratchet up the pressure on those giving bribes and on those receiving them. Trump has been what Lenin called a useful idiot, the unwitting channel for a move that will be bad for development, bad for global security and bad for America.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Joseph Bedich, an esteemed dentist near Warren, OH, recently attended the 150th Annual Ohio Dental Association State Conference in Columbus, Ohio, with his team. He also served as an Alternative Delegate at the ODA House of Delegates Meeting. Offering the latest general and cosmetic dentistry treatments at his practice, the Center for Progressive Dentistry, Dr. Bedich has committed to over two thousand hours of continuing education courses in the last two years. Dedicated to oral health, the Ohio Dental Association gathers dental professionals from across the state to develop and strengthen dentistry in Ohio. As an alternative delegate, Dr. Bedich was honored to take a larger role in advancing public and professional knowledge of proper oral health. Dr. Bedich and his team of dental assistants took continuing education courses at the recent Annual Ohio Dental Association State Conference with the goal of bringing the most cutting-edge and promising care to their patients. Dr. Bedich attended practice management courses and the business and office managers expanded their dental software knowledge to improve how they are able to help the practice and each patient. Participating in a two-day chairside course, the Center for Progressive Dentistry’s team of dental assistants learned modern techniques utilizing leading materials in order to provide a state-of-the-art patient experience. Covering cutting-edge cosmetic dentistry procedures, digital photography, bleaching and impression techniques, the team is excited to provide a comfortable treatment experience to each new patient. Dr. Bedich also attended a course covering the latest laser dentistry techniques for minimally-invasive treatment. Dr. Bedich and his team welcome new patients in need of a variety of cosmetic dentistry treatments including CEREC® same-day dental crowns, Invisalign®, teeth whitening and dental implants, among other services. Patients in need of a trusted dentist near Warren, OH or a dental team dedicated to patient care and state-of-the-art treatment, can call the Center for Progressive Dentistry at 330-615-1598. Dr. Joseph D. Bedich is a general dentist in Cortland, OH offering personalized dental care to patients. Dr. Bedich understands the importance of learning the most cutting-edge techniques, which is why he has taken over 2,000 hours of continuing education in a wide variety of services including sedation, implant dentistry, sleep apnea, cosmetic dentistry and head and neck pain management. To learn more about Dr. Bedich or the services he offers, visit his website at http://www.adazzlingsmile.com or call his office at (330) 615-1598 to schedule an appointment.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Make the Effort to Love Your Mouth, All Year Round TORONTO, ON--(Marketwired - February 10, 2017) - It's almost Valentine's Day, a time of enchantment and affection. But how much love and attention do you show your mouth? If you're not making the effort to practice good oral hygiene habits like brushing twice a day, flossing daily and going to the dentist for regular check-ups, then you're falling short of being a good partner in your mouth's fight against tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath. We all know fresh breath and a healthy smile are important, so the Ontario Dental Association (ODA) is passing along some helpful hints on how to be ready for Valentine's Day or any day! ODA President Dr. Jack McLister, says, "While persistent bad breath can be a sign of a more serious health condition, most of the time it's due to poor oral health-care routines. Show your mouth that you care by brushing and flossing every day." The ODA has been the voluntary professional association for dentists in Ontario since 1867. Today, we represent more than 9,000, or nine in 10, dentists across the province. The ODA is Ontario's primary source of information on oral health and the dental profession. We advocate for accessible and sustainable optimal oral health for all Ontarians by working with health-care professionals, governments, the private sector and the public. For more information on this and other helpful dental care tips, visit www.youroralhealth.ca.


The Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) market is expected to reach USD 8.7 billion by 2025, according to the new report by Grand View Research, Inc. Incidents of PAH, increasing geriatric population, and government support to develop orphan drugs are key driving factors. Cumulatively, the cases of PAH are in the range of 100,000 to 200,000 per year. However, in the past few years, the prevalence of this disorder is rising due to risk factors like sedentary lifestyle, HIV, smoking, alcohol/tobacco consumption, and other idiopathic conditions. The presence of a large population over 60 years globally, which has lower immunity levels and is prone to PAH and associated diseases, which is a high impact-rendering driver for the growth of the market over the forecast period. Supportive government initiatives for the development of drugs for rare diseases or orphan drugs are anticipated to facilitate the market growth over the forecast period. For instance, the Orphan Drug Act (ODA) 1983, and Rare Disease Act 2002 in the U.S. offer incentives such as tax credits for the development of orphan drugs. Patent expiry of key PAH molecules is projected to have a deep impact on market dynamics. In coming two to four years the exclusivity of key brands such as Tracleer, Remodulin, Adcirca, Ventavis, Tyvaso, and Letairis will be lost. This will foster the entry of generic product at prices much lower than branded drugs. Browse full research report with TOC on "Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) Market by Drug Class (Prostacyclin and Prostacyclin Analogs, Soluble Guanylate Cyclase (SGC) Stimulators, Endothelin Receptor Antagonists (ERA), Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5)) and Segment Forecasts to 2025" at: http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-market Further Key Findings From the Study Suggest: Grand View Research has segmented the PAH market on the basis of drug class and region: Grand View Research, Inc. is a U.S. based market research and consulting company, registered in the State of California and headquartered in San Francisco. The company provides syndicated research reports, customized research reports, and consulting services. To help clients make informed business decisions, we offer market intelligence studies ensuring relevant and fact-based research across a range of industries, from technology to chemicals, materials and healthcare.


News Article | March 3, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

It's a Friday night and I'm about to meet a hot date I hooked up with on a dating app. But how do I know he's really who he says he is? After all, online dating fraud is on the rise and it seems easy for people to adopt false identities, stealing photos from other websites and concocting plausible back stories. Luckily, my date seemed legit, but if I'd been concerned I could have used a service like Circle 6. You can let six of your closest friends know where you are at all times, and with just one tap you can contact them should you feel in danger while out on a date. Online dating is a big and growing business - dating apps are worth $2.5bn (£2bn) in the US alone, according to Marketdata Enterprises. New stats from campaign Get Safe Online reveal that seven reports of dating fraud are received by the UK's Action Fraud every day - an increase of 32% over two years. So what are these companies doing to keep their members safe? A few of the smaller apps are using technology such as Jumio, a digital identification service, to filter out scammers. Dating app TrueView, for example, uses it and has adopted a trust score verification system. "We didn't want to create just another dating app, there are tonnes of those," says co-founder Matt Verity. "We wanted to create one where people felt confident about who they're talking to. The more social media accounts you link to it, the more your trust score goes up," says Mr Verity. But social media accounts can be bogus, too, and set up in a matter of minutes, so as well as using Jumio to delve into these accounts, they adopt another layer of identification. "An added level of this trust score is getting users to scan in driving licences and passports - allowing you to verify who you say you are," says Mr Verity. "The more your trust score goes up, the more trustworthy you'll look on the site." Users can then choose to filter out anyone who doesn't have the same level of trust verification as themselves. But, he insists, anyone with a very low level trust score for a long period would be looked into further. Yoti may be useful to check out the credentials of someone you're interested in dating. The app gives anyone the ability to check the name, photo and age of people they meet online. Once you've made contact with someone you can simply send them a text via the app, asking them to verify themselves using a selfie, mobile number and ID, such as a passport. A handful of other small dating sites and apps - Mai Tai for example - use similar verification systems. But VieLoco believes video is also a useful tool. "Live video chat is the best way to discover if someone doesn't look like their photos or behaves how you might expect them to, which may be a sign that you should proceed with caution," says co-founder Nora Lee Notzon. But what are the bigger dating companies doing to ensure our safety? Many issue guidelines, such as never to give out personal information and to watch out for odd language in messages or personal profiles, for example. Many insist they apply security measures, but won't reveal what systems they use. A spokesman for Match.com told the BBC: "We have a dedicated team who monitor security on the site, through both up-to-date technology and human checks. "But, like many companies, we do not disclose details of our security and fraud prevention tools as this provides valuable information to those with criminal intentions." So we just have to trust them? "Bigger organisations will use a variety of datasets as part of their counter-fraud solutions," says Andrew McClelland, chief executive of the Online Dating Association (ODA). "They are able to automate much of this using feeds from data providers that use sources such as the DVLA [the UK's Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency]." While the ODA does provide a code of practice on how dating websites should be run and how they should keep members safe, he admits that it does "require members to carry out checks, but doesn't prescribe how these checks are done". "They definitely have systems in place. However, if revealed, they can easily be mirrored by competitors," says Tom Bourlet, a former digital marketing consultant at a dating website. "Most use photo-recognition software. If the image is a duplicate from another website, it is instantly deleted. We also built an algorithm to read the content for duplication or syndication." Some experts believe dating sites could be doing more to analyse the language people use. Last year Tom van Laer and a group of researchers at London's City University compared tens of thousands of emails pre-identified as lies with those known to be truthful. The algorithm analysed their word use, structure and context for linguistic differences. "Liars cannot generate deceptive emails from actual memory so they avoid spontaneity to evade detection," says Mr van Laer. Algorithms can pick up on these traits, he says. A recent investigation by Wired magazine revealed just how cavalier some of these dating sites services can be with our personal data. And with many dating companies not being transparent about what systems they use to protect us, are we in danger of losing faith in them? A recent YouGov survey revealed that only half of UK consumers are confident that the personal details on someone's dating profile are true. But that doesn't seem to be stopping hundreds of millions of people around the world from using online dating sites and apps. And many have found love through them. But until there is a bulletproof way of weeding out the fraudsters, the advice must be: proceed with caution. Follow Technology of Business editor Matthew Wall on Twitter and Facebook Click here for more Technology of Business features


To provide a flowing water splitting apparatus, a flowing water splitting method, and a sewage system each capable of enhancing the flow quantity splitting function for flowing water by a simple structure to reduce the flow quantity of the flowing water flowing to a dirty water pipe. A flowing water splitting apparatus 10 includes a first flowing water channel 20 including a weir 28 defining a water quantity of the flowing water flowing in from a confluent pipe 14 and leading the flowing water flowing in from the confluent pipe 14 to a dirty water pipe 16; a second flowing water channel 32 leading flowing water flowing over the weir 28 to a rainwater pipe 18; a partition wall portion 26 provided to block the flowing water flowing through the first flowing water channel 20 to form a plurality of water diversion chambers 28 partitioned in the first flowing water channel 20; and a flow throttle portion 30 formed in the partition wall portion 26 to throttle a flow quantity of the flowing water flowing from one water diversion chamber into another water diversion chamber 28.

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