October University

Egypt

October University

Egypt
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Farag A.G.A.,Menoufia University | Elnaidany N.F.,October University | El-Dien M.M.S.,Menoufia University
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2016

Introduction: Obesity in adults is associated with numerous health disorders including some forms of cancer. Various epidemiological studies have found a link between excess adiposity and malignant melanoma; however, the association with non melanoma skin cancer is questionable. Leptin is a hormone produced mainly by the adipose tissue and its serum level may reflect body mass index. Leptin is reported to promote proliferation and angiogenesis and deregulate apoptosis, therefore facilitates the process of carcinogenesis. Aim: The current study tried to assess leptin localization and expression in non melanoma skin cancer to verify its possible role in pathogenesis of this cancer. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 13 Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) cases and 14 Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) cases together with 19 normal skin biopsies as a control group using immunohistochemical method. Results: Leptin was expressed in 52.6% of the normal epidermis with pure cytoplasmic and both cytoplasmic and nuclear staining patterns. All cases of SCC (100%) and two cases of BCC (15.4%) showed leptin expression in tumour cells whereas nuclear expression was in favour of SCC. Stromal expression of leptin was seen in both SCC (57.1%) and BCC (38.5%) without significant differences. Percentage of leptin expression by tumour cells in SCC showed positive linear correlation with tumour size (p=0.02) and microvessel density (p=0.000). Stromal expression of leptin in SCC was associated with large tumour size (p=0.04), advanced stage (p=0.01) and tumours arising in sites other than head and neck (p=0.01). Conclusion: Leptin could have a more important role in pathogenesis of cutaneous SCC rather than BCC that may reflect the trivial role of obesity in induction of BCC. The expression of leptin by tumour and stromal cells of SCC could co-operate in its progression by promoting angiogenesis with subsequently acquiring large tumour size and then advanced stage. © 2016, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.


Abdou A.G.,Menoufia University | Asaad N.Y.,Menoufia University | Ehsan N.,Menoufia University | Eltahmody M.,Menoufia University | And 3 more authors.
APMIS | Year: 2015

The primary goal of HCV therapy is to achieve a sustained virological response (SVR). Many host and viral factors influence the treatment response. Cytokines play an important role in the defense against viral infections, where successful treatment of hepatitis C depends on a complex balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the presence and percentage of some cytokines (IL-28, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) regarding different clinicopathological parameters including response to therapy in chronic HCV patients using immunohistochemical technique. This study was carried out on 64 chronic HCV patients (34 responders and 30 non-responders). Of cases, 54% showed IL-28 expression, which was associated with low AST (p = 0.002) and low HAI score (p = 0.006). Of cases, 67 and 45% showed IFN-γ and TNF-α expression, respectively, where the median percentage of TNF-α expression was higher in grade II spotty necrosis compared to grade I. Some inflammatory cytokines expressed by intrahepatic inflammatory cells in chronic HCV patients promote inflammation and injury (pro-inflammatory) such as TNF-α. Other cytokines aid in resolving inflammation and injury (anti-inflammatory) such as IL-28. The balance between these cytokines will determine the degree of inflammatory state. None of the investigated cytokines proved its clear cut role in affecting response to therapy, however, their levels varied between responders and non-responders for further investigations to clarify. © 2014 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


PubMed | Menoufia University and October University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR | Year: 2016

Obesity in adults is associated with numerous health disorders including some forms of cancer. Various epidemiological studies have found a link between excess adiposity and malignant melanoma; however, the association with non melanoma skin cancer is questionable. Leptin is a hormone produced mainly by the adipose tissue and its serum level may reflect body mass index. Leptin is reported to promote proliferation and angiogenesis and deregulate apoptosis, therefore facilitates the process of carcinogenesis.The current study tried to assess leptin localization and expression in non melanoma skin cancer to verify its possible role in pathogenesis of this cancer.This study was carried out on 13 Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) cases and 14 Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) cases together with 19 normal skin biopsies as a control group using immunohistochemical method.Leptin was expressed in 52.6% of the normal epidermis with pure cytoplasmic and both cytoplasmic and nuclear staining patterns. All cases of SCC (100%) and two cases of BCC (15.4%) showed leptin expression in tumour cells whereas nuclear expression was in favour of SCC. Stromal expression of leptin was seen in both SCC (57.1%) and BCC (38.5%) without significant differences. Percentage of leptin expression by tumour cells in SCC showed positive linear correlation with tumour size (p=0.02) and microvessel density (p=0.000). Stromal expression of leptin in SCC was associated with large tumour size (p=0.04), advanced stage (p=0.01) and tumours arising in sites other than head and neck (p=0.01).Leptin could have a more important role in pathogenesis of cutaneous SCC rather than BCC that may reflect the trivial role of obesity in induction of BCC. The expression of leptin by tumour and stromal cells of SCC could co-operate in its progression by promoting angiogenesis with subsequently acquiring large tumour size and then advanced stage.

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