Qingdao, China

Ocean University of China

www.ouc.edu.cn/
Qingdao, China

The Ocean University of China , colloquially known as Haida is a university in Qingdao. As one of the key comprehensive universities of China, it is under the direct jurisdiction of the Ministry of Education. While offering studies in all major branches of technical and social science, the university is especially renowned for its marine science and fishery science departments. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Chinese researchers believe they’ve gotten a step closer to producing all-weather photovoltaics by integrating phosphors into solar cells Solar power is playing an ever-greater role in our energy landscape, and its efficiency continues to improve. However, to date, photovoltaic systems can still only produce power when the sun is in the sky. But a group of materials scientists in China say that they’ve found a way to help dye-sensitised solar cells work after dusk. All photovoltaic devices are based light absorption followed by charge separation. In most commercial devices, solid-state silicon manages both of these tasks, but in dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSCs), sometimes called Grätzel cells, the two tasks are separated. In their thin film structure, light is absorbed by a sensitizer electrolyte (a dye), with charge separation then occurring at the interface between the dye and a solid, mesoporous oxide layer. Into this structure, Qunwei Tang and his colleagues at the Ocean University of China propose adding long persistence phosphors, in order to utilise unabsorbed light in the cell. Writing in Nano Energy [DOI: 10.1016/j.nanoen.2017.01.047], they report on the integration of purple, blue, cyan, green, red and white-emitting phosphors into dye-sensitised solar cells with TiO photoanodes. The idea is that the phosphors act as storage materials within the cell – when illuminated by sunlight, they harvest energy from ultraviolet light, and then, once the light source is removed, they release persistent visible fluorescence at a different wavelength that can then be absorbed by the dye. And it appeared to work largely as predicted. The authors showed that when illuminated by a solar simulator, the standard DSSC displayed a cell efficiency of 8.08%, while the cell with a green phosphor reached 10.08%. In dark conditions, the voltage output of the standard cell rapidly dropped to zero. But the phosphor-enhanced cells continued to produce small voltages in the absence of light. Though all displayed a significant reduction in the first five minutes of darkness, five of them persisted, with the cyan cell producing 0.284 V one hour after the light source had been switched off. While still very much at the lab scale, this result poses further questions of current DSSC design. The same group recently reported on their development of a flexible cell that can be triggered by both rain and sun. Combined with this latest paper, they seem to be getting closer to their goal of making a truly all-weather photovoltaic. Q. Tang, J. Wang, B. He, P. Yang, “Can dye-sensitized solar cells generate electricity in the dark?” Nano Energy, Vol 33 (2017) 266–271. DOI: 10.1016/j.nanoen.2017.01.047


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.undercurrentnews.com

Analysis of residual material elements in shrimp could help importers trace the shrimp's country of origin, according to a study by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Researchers from Auburn University and Ocean University of China looked at farmed Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) from three major exporting countries – India, Vietnam, and Thailand. Using elemental profiling to analyze a set of the elements that make up a material or species, they found the method could distinguish shrimp from different countries with a 98% level of certainty. "With greater refinement, elemental profiling may help importers, customs officials, retailers, and others trace globally traded seafood back to its source, which can shed light on production practices," said WWF. Aaron McNevin, Ph.D., director of sustainable food at WWF added: “Traceability allowing a consumer to know where their shrimp came from largely isn’t possible in the mainstream markets today. Without knowing where a product is coming from, it is impossible to determine if the environment at a farm is being compromised or if workers are being mistreated." "Elemental profiling gets us one step closer to farm origin and that’s what we are after.” While the study confirmed accuracy in the traceability of shrimp to a parent country, it found that trying to trace the origin down to states or provinces showed promise, but was not as reliable as traceability on the country scale.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

Farmed shrimp from Thailand, Vietnam, and India could be traced back to their countries of origin with more than 98 percent confidence through a process known as elemental profiling, according to a new World Wildlife Fund (WWF) report. With greater refinement, elemental profiling may help importers, customs officials, retailers, and others trace globally traded seafood back to its source, which can shed light on production practices with critical environmental and social implications. The report, conducted by WWF researchers and supported by Auburn University and Ocean University of China, looked at farmed Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) from three major exporting countries – India, Vietnam, and Thailand. The study concluded that elemental profiling could distinguish shrimp from different countries with a 98 percent level of certainty. “Traceability allowing a consumer to know where their shrimp came from largely isn’t possible in the mainstream markets today,” said Dr Aaron McNevin, director of sustainable food at WWF. “Without knowing where a product is coming from, it is impossible to determine if the environment at a farm is being compromised or if workers are being mistreated. Elemental profiling gets us one step closer to farm origin and that’s what we are after.” Today, when it is even possible, tracking farmed shrimp to its source depends on records often provided by exporters. There is no objective way to verify these records with certainty, leaving opportunities for mislabeling and fraud. Lack of transparency and traceability prevents buyers from obtaining critical information including environmental stewardship and natural resource use, as well as worker welfare and food safety. The average American eats about four pounds of shrimp per year, over 80 percent of which is imported. Overall, the US imported 567,551 tons of shrimp valued at $6.7 billion in 2014 from 39 countries, many from farms. “We have attempted elemental profiling in the southeastern US and it worked well for catfish and shrimp – the logical choice was to expand to the major farming countries,” said Dr Claude Boyd, Professor of Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences at Auburn University. “This research demonstrated that we also have some ability to differentiate shrimp from provinces and states in countries, albeit not to the same level of confidence as the country.” Elemental profiling is the process of analyzing a set of the elements that make up a material or species. In this case, 23 elements found in shrimp were examined. While the study confirmed accuracy in the traceability of shrimp to a parent country, it found that trying to trace the origin down to states or provinces showed promise, but was not as reliable as traceability on the country scale.


The invention provides an alginate oligosaccharide and its derivatives with the degree of polymerization ranging from 2 to 22. The alginate oligosaccharide is composed of -D-mannuronic acid linked by 1,4 glycosidic bonds. The derivatives with the reduced terminal in position 1 of carboxyl radical can be prepared by oxidative degradation. The invention also provides a process for preparing the alginate oligosaccharide and its derivatives, which includes the procedure that an alginate solution is reacted for 2 to 6 h in an autoclave at pH 26 and the temperature of 100-120 C., and adjusted pH to 7 after the reaction is stopped, after which the resultant oligosaccharide is oxidized in the presence of an oxidant to obtain an oxidative product. The alginate oligosaccharide and its derivatives of the invention can be used in the manufacture of a medicament for the prophylaxis and treatment of AD and diabetes.


Zhang S.,Ocean University of China
Developmental and comparative immunology | Year: 2013

Both innate and adaptive immune-relevant factors are transferred from mother to offspring in fishes. These maternally-transferred factors include IgM, lysozymes, lectin, cathelicidin and complement components. Recently, yolk proteins, phosvitin and lipovitellin, have been shown to be maternally-transferred factors, functioning in the defense of teleost larvae against pathogens. Among these factors, the mode of action of complement components and yolk proteins has been explored, whereas that of all the other factors remains elusive. At present, the transfer mechanisms of maternally-derived immune factors are largely unknown although those of IgM and yolk protein transmission from mother to offspring have been reported in some fishes. Maternal transfer of immunity is affected by many elements, including biological factors, such as age and maturation, and environmental conditions experienced by brood fish, such as pathogens and nutritional supply. Practically, the manipulation of maternal immunity transfer can be used to enhance the survival rate of fish larvae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Zhang Q.,Ocean University of China
Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society | Year: 2012

The ciliate subclass Haptoria is a diverse taxon that includes most of the free-living predators in the class Litostomatea. Phylogenetic study of this group was initially conducted using a single molecular marker small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA genes). Multi-gene analysis has been limited because very few other sequences were available. We performed phylogenetic analyses of Haptoria incorporating new SSU rRNA gene sequences from several debated members of the taxon, in particular, the first molecular data from Cyclotrichium. We also provided nine large-subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA) gene sequences and 10 alpha-tubulin sequences from diverse haptorians, and two possible relatives of controversial haptorians (Plagiopylea, Prostomatea). Phylogenies inferred from the different molecules showed the following: (i) Cyclotrichium and Paraspathidium were clearly separated from the haptorids and even from class Litostomatea, rejecting their high-level taxonomic assignments based on morphology. Both genera branch instead with the classes Plagiopylea, Prostomatea and Oligohymenophora. This raises the possibility that the well-known but phylogenetically problematic cyclotrichiids Mesodinium and Myrionecta may also have affinities here, rather than with litostomes; (ii) the transfer of Trachelotractus to Litostomatea is supported, especially by the analyses of SSU rRNA and LSU rRNA genes, however, Trachelotractus and Chaenea (more uncertainly) generally form the two deepest lineages within litostomes; and (iii) phylogenies of the new molecular markers are consistent with SSU rRNA gene information in recovering order Pleurostomatida as monophyletic. However, Pleurostomatida branches cladistically within order Haptorida, as does subclass Trichostomatia (on the basis of SSU rRNA phylogenies). Our results suggest that the class-level taxonomy of ciliates is still not resolved, and also that a systematic revision of litostomes is required, beginning at high taxonomic levels (taxa currently ranked as subclasses and orders).


Chen X.,Ocean University of China | Chen X.,University of Washington | Tung K.-K.,University of Washington
Science | Year: 2014

A vacillating global heat sink at intermediate ocean depths is associated with different climate regimes of surface warming under anthropogenic forcing: The latter part of the 20th century saw rapid global warming as more heat stayed near the surface. In the 21st century, surface warming slowed as more heat moved into deeper oceans. In situ and reanalyzed data are used to trace the pathways of ocean heat uptake. In addition to the shallow La Niña-like patterns in the Pacific that were the previous focus, we found that the slowdown is mainly caused by heat transported to deeper layers in the Atlantic and the Southern oceans, initiated by a recurrent salinity anomaly in the subpolar North Atlantic. Cooling periods associated with the latter deeper heat-sequestration mechanism historically lasted 20 to 35 years.


The invention relates to an oxygen and nitrogen co-doped polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber and a preparation method thereof. The oxygen and nitrogen co-doped polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber is prepared by electrochemical modification of a raw-material polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber, such that the surface thereof has an active layer formed by oxygen-containing active functional groups and nitrogen-containing active functional groups, wherein the nitrogen-containing active functional groups are obtained by activation of the doped nitrogen inherently contained in the raw-material polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber by means of electrochemical modification. The method for preparing the oxygen and nitrogen co-doped polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber comprises the following steps: placing the raw-material polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber in an electrolyte solution, subjecting it to cyclic treatment between electrochemical oxidation and electrochemical reduction, and thus obtaining the oxygen and nitrogen co-doped polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber. The oxygen and nitrogen co-doped polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber of the present invention has both the pseudo-capacitive properties for oxidation-reduction reactions and electrocatalytic properties for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction.


Patent
Ocean University of China | Date: 2015-09-11

An along-the-cable reciprocating motion control mechanism includes a moving platform, weight drop-off gear, weight release gear and trigger gear. The moving platform is set at a guide cable and can make reciprocating motion along the guide cable. A profiler is carried by the moving platform and the buoyancy of the moving platform carrying the profiler is greater than zero, the weight drop-off gear is set at the top of the guide cable and can drop a weight onto the moving platform within a predefined period, the weight release gear is provided on the moving platform, the trigger gear is set at the bottom of the guide cable, and when the moving platform carries a weight and descends to the bottom of the guide cable, the trigger gear touches the weight release gear to enable it to make a series of actions.


Patent
Ocean University of China | Date: 2015-09-11

A method includes: a guide cable and an observation platform is provided, a profiler is mounted, and a trigger gear is set at the bottom of the guide cable; a weight drop-off gear is set at the top of the guide cable, when the observation platform is located at the top of the guide cable, one weight is released by the weight drop-off gear onto the observation platform so that the observation platform descends along the guide cable owing to additional gravity, and when the observation platform descends to the given position of the trigger gear at the bottom of the guide cable, the release gear releases the weight on the observation platform so that the observation platform returns by its own buoyancy to the top along the guide cable; another weight is subsequently released by the weight drop-off gear so that the observation platform repeats the foregoing reciprocating motion.

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