East Greenwich, United States
East Greenwich, United States

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PubMed | Ocean State Veterinary Specialists, University of Pennsylvania, Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital and Tufts University
Type: | Journal: Journal of veterinary internal medicine | Year: 2017

The coagulation status of dogs with liver disease is difficult to predict using conventional coagulation testing.To evaluate thromboelastography (TEG) results and associations with conventional coagulation results and indicators of disease severity and prognosis in dogs with chronic hepatopathies (CH).Twenty-one client-owned dogs.Dogs with CH were prospectively (10 dogs) and retrospectively (11 dogs) enrolled from 2008 to 2014. Kaolin-activated TEG was performed and compared with reference intervals by t-tests or Mann-Whitney tests. Correlation coefficients for TEG results and conventional coagulation and clinicopathologic results were determined. Significance was set at P < .05.Dogs with CH had significant increases in R (5.30 min vs 4.33 min), K (3.77 min vs 2.11 min), and LY30 (4.77% vs 0.68%) and decreased angles (55.3 vs 62.4). G value defined 9 of 21, 7 of 21, and 5 of 21 dogs as normocoagulable, hypercoagulable, and hypocoagulable, respectively. G and MA were correlated with fibrinogen (r = 0.68, 0.83), prothrombin time (PT; r = -0.51, -0.53), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT; r = -0.50, -0.50). K was correlated with PT (r = 0.75) and protein C activity (r = -0.92). Angle was correlated with aPTT (r = -0.63). Clinical score was correlated with PT (r = 0.60), MA (r = -0.53), and R (r = -0.47). Dogs with hyperfibrinolysis (LY30 > 3.04%; 5 of 21) had significantly higher serum transaminase activities. Dogs with portal hypertension had significantly lower G, MA, and angle and prolonged, K, R, and PT.Dogs with CH have variable TEG results. Negative prognostic indicators in CH correlate with hypocoagulable parameters on TEG. Hyperfibrinolysis in dogs with CH is associated with high disease activity.


Brown C.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Lab Animal | Year: 2010

Ear (aural) hematomas occur when blood vessels in the pinna rupture secondary to trauma or excessive head shaking. Blood fills the space between the skin and the cartilage, causing pain and potential deformity of the ear. In this column, I discuss surgical treatment of aural hematomas in the dog.


Brown C.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Lab Animal | Year: 2010

If a rabbit is ill or will be undergoing certain types of surgery, it may need to be fed using a nasogastric tube. Nasogastric intubation is easy and is an effective means of delivering nutrition and fluids when other feeding methods are not feasible. This column describes how to place a nasogastric tube in a rabbit.


Brown C.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Lab Animal | Year: 2010

Snakes are used in various investigations of the effects of their venom on human physiology. Blood sampling is frequently an important part of these investigations. The heart is the most commonly used venipuncture site in snakes because it yields a reasonably large sample. This column describes cardiocentesis for blood sample collection in the snake.


Brown C.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Lab Animal | Year: 2010

Environmental enrichment must be provided for the various animal species that are housed in laboratory animal facilities. Wheatgrass can be used as a natural form of enrichment that requires minimal preparation and effort. Wheatgrass is appropriate enrichment for cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rodents and birds.


Brown C.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Lab Animal | Year: 2010

Frogs in the research setting may require administration of test compounds or of medications (if they are ill). Various routes of administration can be used in frogs, including parenteral, enteral, transdermal and oral. This column discusses clinical techniques for restraint and oral administration of medication, food or test compounds in frogs.


Kyes J.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Compendium (Yardley, PA) | Year: 2011

Hypertonic saline solutions (HSS) have several characteristics that may improve the survival of patients during the initial treatment of certain types of shock. The use of isotonic crystalloids for resuscitation has several limitations: large infusion volumes are needed to increase the intravascular space; these large volumes cannot be given rapidly; and the fluid rapidly redistributes throughout the extravascular space. HSS are administered as a small-volume bolus over a few minutes and, by mobilizing extravascular water to the intravascular space, result in an immediate restoration of intravascular volume that can last several hours. Additional properties of HSS include positive effects on cardiac function, the microvasculature, and the immune system that not only justify their use in shock resuscitation but also suggest the opportunity for other applications.


Brown C.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Lab Animal | Year: 2011

Urethral catheterization of the female guinea pig has potential diagnostic, therapeutic and research applications. Urethral catheter placement in the female guinea pig is relatively easy to carry out and has fewer potential complications than does catheter placement in male guinea pigs.


Brown C.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Lab Animal | Year: 2011

Cystotomy is a surgical incision into the urinary bladder, which may be required for removal of calculi, diagnosis of tumors or refractory urinary tract infections, or repair of ectopic ureters and ruptured bladders. This column describes the indications and techniques for cystotomy in the rabbit.


Brabson T.L.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists | Bloch C.P.,Bridgewater State University | Johnson J.A.,Ocean State Veterinary Specialists
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery | Year: 2015

Seventy-five male cats with urethral obstruction were prospectively enrolled to evaluate gross urine color at urinary catheter placement for correlation with diagnostic findings. Cats with darker red urine were more likely to be azotemic (serum creatinine concentration >2.0 mg/dl [177 µmol/l]), and urine color correlated well with serum creatinine and serum potassium concentrations. Darker urine color was negatively correlated with urine specific gravity. Urine color was not associated with the presence or absence of lower urinary tract stones on radiographs or ultrasound. Cats with darker red urine at the time of urinary catheter placement are likely to have more significant metabolic derangements and may require more aggressive supportive care. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

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