Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes

Taipei, Taiwan

Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes

Taipei, Taiwan
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Tseng C.-H.,National Taiwan University | Tseng C.-H.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Tseng C.-H.,Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes
BMC Cancer | Year: 2015

Background: Whether rosiglitazone may affect the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has not been investigated. Methods: The reimbursement databases of all Taiwanese diabetic patients from 1996 to 2009 were retrieved from the National Health Insurance. An entry date was set at 1 January 2006 and a total of 886418 patients with type 2 diabetes were followed up for NMSC incidence until the end of 2009. Incidences for ever-users, never-users and subgroups of rosiglitazone exposure (using tertile cutoffs of duration of therapy and cumulative dose) were calculated and hazard ratios estimated by Cox regression. Additional models were created as sensitivity analyses. Results: There were 103097 ever-users and 783321 never-users, respective numbers of incident NMSC 250 (0.24%) and 2084 (0.27%), and respective incidence 68.90 and 76.77 per 100000 person-years. Although the overall hazard ratio was not significant in the unadjusted, age-sex-adjusted or fully adjusted model, the risk was significantly lower in the third tertile of duration of therapy and cumulative dose, with significant P for trends. The fully adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for a duration of therapy >13.77 months and a cumulative dose of >1752 mg was 0.723 (0.566, 0.923) and 0.783 (0.618, 0.993), respectively. The findings were supported by various sensitivity analyses. Conclusions: Rosiglitazone may reduce the risk of NMSC, but further confirmation is required. © Tseng; licensee BioMed Central.


Chen S.-C.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Tseng C.-H.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Tseng C.-H.,National Taiwan University | Tseng C.-H.,Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes
Review of Diabetic Studies | Year: 2013

This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. © by Lab & Life Press/SBDR.


Tseng C.-H.,National Taiwan University | Tseng C.-H.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Tseng C.-H.,Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes
European Journal of Clinical Investigation | Year: 2016

Background: The risk of pancreatic cancer associated with incretin-based therapies is controversial. Methods: This study retrospectively analysed the National Health Insurance database including patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus at an age ≥ 25 years between 1999 and 2010. A total of 71 137 ever users of sitagliptin and 933 046 never users were followed for pancreatic cancer until 31 December 2011. A time-dependent approach was used to calculate incidence and estimate hazard ratios adjusted for propensity score using Cox regression. Results: During follow-up, 83 ever users and 3658 never users developed pancreatic cancer, representing an incidence of 73·6 and 55·0 per 100 000 person-years, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence intervals) for ever versus never users was 1·40 (1·13-1·75). The respective adjusted hazard ratio for the first, second and third tertile of cumulative dose < 14 700, 14 700-33 700 and > 33 700 mg was 1·83 (1·28-2·62), 1·97 (1·41-2·76) and 0·72 (0·45-1·15). For average daily dose of < 50, 50-99·9 and ≥ 100 mg, the respective hazard ratio was 3·10 (1·17-8·26), 1·01 (0·63-1·61) and 1·53 (1·18-1·97). Conclusions: Sitagliptin is significantly associated with a higher risk of pancreatic cancer, especially when the cumulative dose is < 33 700 mg. The risk diminished in users with a higher cumulative dose. The daily dose of sitagliptin should better be kept < 100 mg, and its use should be reconsidered in patients who suffer from severe renal impairment and thus a daily dose of < 50 mg is always recommended. Future studies are required to confirm the findings with more appropriate adjustment for smoking. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Chen A.-H.,Taipei Medical University | Chen A.-H.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Tseng C.-H.,National Taiwan University Hospital | Tseng C.-H.,National Taiwan University | Tseng C.-H.,Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes
Review of Diabetic Studies | Year: 2013

In Asian populations, diabetes mellitus is increasing and has become an important health problem in recent decades. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most important complications and the most common cause of death in diabetic patients. Among the risk factors of CVD, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol has been a major concern. Studies suggested that serum triglyceride may also play a role in predicting CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the association is still debated. In this review, we summarized published studies focusing on the relationship between serum triglyceride and CVD disease in Asian diabetic patients. Ten studies conducted in six different Asian countries (three from Hong Kong, two from Taiwan, tow from Japan, one from Indonesia, one from South India, and one from South Korea) were summarized and discussed. CVD was subdivided into coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Of the ten studies analyzed, one focused on CVD, five on coronary heart disease, three on stroke, three on peripheral arterial disease, and one on mortality from CVD. Studies from Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Japan suggested that triglyceride is a significant and independent risk factor for coronary heart disease, but not a significant risk factor for stroke (studies conducted in Japan and South Korea) or peripheral arterial disease (studies conducted in Taiwan, Indonesia, and South India). Although serum triglyceride may be a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease in Asian diabetic patients, clinical trials evaluating whether lowering triglycerides using fibrates can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in these patients need to be initiated. © by Lab & Life Press/SBDR.

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