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Lyons G.,St. Vincents Hospital | Nixon R.,Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Center
Australasian Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2013

Acrylates are used widely in acrylic nails, dental restorative materials, paint, varnish, printing ink, adhesives, glue, orthopaedic prostheses, bone cement and diathermy pads. This is the first case of allergic contact dermatitis to methacrylates in electrocardiogram electrode dots reported in the literature. © 2012 The Authors Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists. Source


Keegel T.G.,Monash University | Keegel T.G.,University of Melbourne | Nixon R.L.,Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Center | Lamontagne A.D.,University of Melbourne
Contact Dermatitis | Year: 2012

Background. The Australian National Hazard Exposure Worker Surveillance (NHEWS) Survey 2008 was a cross-sectional survey undertaken by Safe Work Australia to inform the development of exposure prevention initiatives for occupational disease. This is a descriptive study of workplace exposures. Objectives. To assess the occupational and demographic characteristics of workers reporting exposure to wet work. Methods. Computer-assisted telephone interviews were conducted with 4500 workers. Two wet work exposure outcomes (frequent washing of hands and duration of time spent at work with the hands immersed in liquids) were analysed. Results. The response rate for the study was 42.3%. For hand-washing, 9.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.9-10.7] reported washing their hands more than 20 times per day. For immersion of hands in liquids, 4.5% (95% CI 3.9-5.1) reported immersion for more than 2 hr per day. Females were more likely to report exposure to frequent hand-washing than males [odds ratio (OR) 1.97, 95% CI 1.49-2.61]. Workers in the lowest occupational skill level jobs were more likely to report increased exposure to hands immersed in liquids than those in the highest (OR 6.41, 95% CI 3.78-10.88). Workers reporting skin exposure to chemicals were more likely to report exposure to hand-washing (OR 3.68, 95% CI 2.91-4.66) and immersion of the hands in liquids (OR 4.09, 95% CI 2.92-5.74). Conclusions. Specific groups of workers reported high levels of exposure to wet work. There were differences between the profiles of workers reporting frequent hand-washing and workers reporting increased duration of exposure to hands immersed in liquids. We also found a high correlation between wet work and chemical exposure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Source


Tversky J.,Oral Mucosal Clinic | Nixon R.,Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Center
Australasian Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2012

Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disorder with significant morbidity, associated with symptoms of pain and local discomfort. The concept of contact allergy aggravating or inducing OLP is recognised, and reported allergens include amalgam, metals used in dental restoration and flavourings. To date there has been only one case report of a contact allergy to spearmint oil in a patient with a 3-year history of OLP. We retrospectively reviewed our positive spearmint oil patch test data at the Skin and Cancer Foundation Victoria over a period of 11 years. In total 73 patients of the 1467 tested for allergy to spearmint oil had positive patch tests. The total number of patches tested during this time was 6134. Of the 73 positive reactions, 19 (26%) were classified as relevant, in that the patients had a history of using spearmint oil-containing products. Coexisting OLP and a spearmint allergy were found in 14 of these 19 patients. All patients had erosive OLP and were female. Patients, especially women, with OLP recalcitrant to treatment should be patch tested to flavourings, especially spearmint oil. We believe that spearmint allergy should be considered a cause of OLP, or at least, of oral lichenoid reactions. © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists. Source


Gamboni S.E.,Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Center | Allen K.J.,Murdoch Childrens Research Institute | Allen K.J.,University of Melbourne | Nixon R.L.,Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Center
Australasian Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2013

There is an increasing awareness of food allergies in the community. Dermatologists frequently see patients with atopic eczema, where parents are extremely concerned about the role of food allergy. Advice given to parents regarding the timing of introduction of solid foods has changed markedly over the past decade. Whereas previous advice advocated delaying the introduction of solid foods until the infant's gastrointestinal system had matured, recent studies suggest that the introduction of solids from around 4 to 6 months may actually prevent the development of allergies. Studies on maternal dietary restrictions during pregnancy and lactation have led researchers to believe that antigen avoidance does not play a significant role in the prevention of atopic disease. Breastfeeding exclusively for 4 to 6 months has multiple benefits for mother and child, however, it does not convincingly prevent food allergies or decrease atopic eczema. New evidence suggests that the use of hydrolysed formulas does not delay or prevent atopic eczema or food allergy. This article aims to highlight current evidence and provide an update for dermatologists on the role of food exposure in the development of atopic disease, namely atopic eczema. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists. Source


Lyons G.,Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Center | Keegel T.,Monash University | Keegel T.,University of Melbourne | Palmer A.,Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Center | Nixon R.,Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Center
Contact Dermatitis | Year: 2013

Background. Hairdressers are one of the largest occupational groups attending our Occupational Dermatology Clinic. However, few seek workers' compensation for their occupational dermatitis. Objectives. To retrospectively analyse and compare workers' compensation claims data and diagnosed disease data for occupational contact dermatitis in hairdressers from 1993 to 2009, for the state of Victoria, Australia. Patients/materials/methods. Data from the Occupational Dermatology Clinic database, the Compensation Research Database and the Australian Bureau of Statistics were used in this study. Results. The clinic database identified 157 hairdressers and apprentices with a confirmed diagnosis of occupational contact dermatitis assessed between 1993 and 2009. Forty-six unique claims for occupational contact dermatitis from 46 individuals were identified from the Compensation Research Database over the same time period. Hairdressers in the 15-24-year age group were significantly over-represented in the claims data relative to the diagnosed disease data (p < 0.01). The median cost per claim was AU$1421, and the median time off work per claim was 20 days. Conclusion. Increased efforts are needed to reduce the incidence of occupational contact dermatitis in hairdressers in Australia, and to ensure that hairdressers with occupational contact dermatitis are aware of their compensation entitlements. Reliance on workers' compensation data for disease surveillance may lead occupational health and safety regulators to underestimate the magnitude of the problem of occupational contact dermatitis in the hairdressing profession. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Source

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